What is certified translation?

Old Sep 24th 2003, 6:57 am
  #1  
Zsombor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default What is certified translation?

Hi,

for documents that were originally written in other than English or French,
a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will be
accepted by CIC?

Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional translation
services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And most
importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
"authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce meaningless
mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.

Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is accurate.
This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different way.

Thanks,

Zsombor
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 7:09 am
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Certified or Registered Translators passed licensing requirements in their
jurisdiction to practice as such and to use title and seal or stamp of
Certified or Registered or Licensed Translator. You haven't.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5...
    > Hi,
    > for documents that were originally written in other than English or
French,
    > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will
be
    > accepted by CIC?
    > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional translation
    > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And
most
    > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
    > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
    > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
    > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce meaningless
    > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
    > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is accurate.
    > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different way.
    > Thanks,
    > Zsombor
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 7:15 am
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 182
Alfaris is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: What is certified translation?

It is not too good to be true, it is true. I did all my documents this way and CIC did not have a problem. It has to be someone other than you, who knows both languages very well, and is willing to swear to that and also that the translation is accurate. It has to be notarized by a Canadian notary.

Alfaris


Originally posted by Zsombor
Hi,

for documents that were originally written in other than English or French,
a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will be
accepted by CIC?

Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional translation
services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And most
importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
"authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce meaningless
mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.

Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is accurate.
This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different way.

Thanks,

Zsombor
Alfaris is offline  
Old Sep 24th 2003, 7:58 am
  #4  
Zsombor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Sad. ;-(

Now, just out of curiousity, is there a world-wide accepted standard for
these translator licensing requirements (comparable, for example, to the
IELTS test, which is pretty much the only accepted way to prove that I speak
English, even though I bet that pretty much every friggin' country has its
own language test system), or the CIC accepts whatever is accepted in that
"jurisdiction"?

And more importantly, how can I find out if a certain professional
translator has the license accepted by the CIC?

Thanks,

Zsombor

"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:BZlcb.1159$t7.120@edtnps84...
    > Certified or Registered Translators passed licensing requirements in their
    > jurisdiction to practice as such and to use title and seal or stamp of
    > Certified or Registered or Licensed Translator. You haven't.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > ________________________________
    > "Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > for documents that were originally written in other than English or
    > French,
    > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will
    > be
    > > accepted by CIC?
    > >
    > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional
translation
    > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And
    > most
    > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
    > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
    > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
    > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce
meaningless
    > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > >
    > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
    > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is
accurate.
    > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different
way.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Zsombor
    > >
    > >
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 8:04 am
  #5  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

It doesn't need to be any translator accepted or approved by CIC. Check in
your home country - it is always easy to find one inexpensive back home, no
matter where that home is.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:1064433624.412081@sj-nntpcache-3...
    > Sad. ;-(
    > Now, just out of curiousity, is there a world-wide accepted standard for
    > these translator licensing requirements (comparable, for example, to the
    > IELTS test, which is pretty much the only accepted way to prove that I
speak
    > English, even though I bet that pretty much every friggin' country has its
    > own language test system), or the CIC accepts whatever is accepted in that
    > "jurisdiction"?
    > And more importantly, how can I find out if a certain professional
    > translator has the license accepted by the CIC?
    > Thanks,
    > Zsombor
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BZlcb.1159$t7.120@edtnps84...
    > > Certified or Registered Translators passed licensing requirements in
their
    > > jurisdiction to practice as such and to use title and seal or stamp of
    > > Certified or Registered or Licensed Translator. You haven't.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > for documents that were originally written in other than English or
    > > French,
    > > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation
will
    > > be
    > > > accepted by CIC?
    > > >
    > > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional
    > translation
    > > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive.
And
    > > most
    > > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone
who
    > > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow
I
    > > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many
of
    > > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce
    > meaningless
    > > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > > >
    > > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as
the
    > > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is
    > accurate.
    > > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different
    > way.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Zsombor
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 10:01 am
  #6  
Vladimir Menkov
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

In article <1064433624.412081@sj-nntpcache-3>,
Zsombor <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Now, just out of curiousity, is there a world-wide accepted standard for
    >these translator licensing requirements (comparable, for example, to the
    >IELTS test, which is pretty much the only accepted way to prove that I speak
    >English, even though I bet that pretty much every friggin' country has its
    >own language test system), or the CIC accepts whatever is accepted in that
    >"jurisdiction"?

As Andrew has said, CIC accepts whatever is accepted in the
jurisdiction where the translation has been made. As to whatthose
other countries require -- it varies. In Australia, for example, a
translator must be a member of NAATI. In the USA, there does not seem
to be a national system for licensing translators, but, the last time
I checked, the government agencies such as INS or IRS, would accept a
translation prepared by any person competent to translate (not
yourself), as long as s/he appends to the translation a statement
claiming that he is competent to translate from language X to English,
and that the translation above is full and correct; he had to sign
that statement in the presence of a notary public, who would then
notarize his signature.

--vld.
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 1:23 pm
  #7  
Zsombor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Very interesting, so after all there is some truth in these rumors!

May I ask where and when you applied?

Also, you don't happen to have a pointer to some CIC web pages where this is
stated explicitly, do you? (Now, that would be *way* too good to be true...
    

In any case, thanks a bunch for taking the time and replying.

Zsombor

"Alfaris" <member12199@british_expats.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > It is not too good to be true, it is true. I did all my documents this
    > way and CIC did not have a problem. It has to be someone other than you,
    > who knows both languages very well, and is willing to swear to that and
    > also that the translation is accurate. It has to be notarized by a
    > Canadian notary.
    > Alfaris
    > Originally posted by Zsombor
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > for documents that were originally written in other than English
    > > or French,
    > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the
    > > translation will be
    > > accepted by CIC?
    > >
    > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional
    > > translation
    > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive.
    > > And most
    > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than
    > > anyone who
    > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them?
    > > Somehow I
    > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests
    > > that many of
    > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce
    > > meaningless
    > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > >
    > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as
    > > long as the
    > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is
    > > accurate.
    > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a
    > > different way.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > Zsombor
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 1:29 pm
  #8  
Zsombor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

"Vladimir Menkov" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > In article <1064433624.412081@sj-nntpcache-3>,
    > Zsombor <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >Now, just out of curiousity, is there a world-wide accepted standard for
    > >these translator licensing requirements (comparable, for example, to the
    > >IELTS test, which is pretty much the only accepted way to prove that I
speak
    > >English, even though I bet that pretty much every friggin' country has
its
    > >own language test system), or the CIC accepts whatever is accepted in
that
    > >"jurisdiction"?
    > As Andrew has said, CIC accepts whatever is accepted in the
    > jurisdiction where the translation has been made. As to whatthose
    > other countries require -- it varies.

You mean the country where I apply for the visa, right?

    > In Australia, for example, a
    > translator must be a member of NAATI. In the USA, there does not seem
    > to be a national system for licensing translators, but, the last time
    > I checked, the government agencies such as INS or IRS, would accept a
    > translation prepared by any person competent to translate (not
    > yourself), as long as s/he appends to the translation a statement
    > claiming that he is competent to translate from language X to English,
    > and that the translation above is full and correct; he had to sign
    > that statement in the presence of a notary public, who would then
    > notarize his signature.

So basically you are saying that this solution is applicable to countries
where there is no national system for lincensing?

Thanks,

Zsombor
    > --vld.
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 4:36 pm
  #9  
Art
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Andrew,

A questions about notorization. Do all other photocopied documents that are
in english (ie. sponsor's/applicant's passport & passport stamp pages,
marriage certificate, birth certificate, citizenship card) also have to be
notorized in the case of a spousal sponsored PR visa application from
abroad, or is it only translated documents that have to be notorized?

THAnks
Art

"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:BZlcb.1159$t7.120@edtnps84...
    > Certified or Registered Translators passed licensing requirements in their
    > jurisdiction to practice as such and to use title and seal or stamp of
    > Certified or Registered or Licensed Translator. You haven't.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > ________________________________
    > "Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > for documents that were originally written in other than English or
    > French,
    > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will
    > be
    > > accepted by CIC?
    > >
    > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional
translation
    > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And
    > most
    > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
    > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
    > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
    > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce
meaningless
    > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > >
    > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
    > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is
accurate.
    > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different
way.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Zsombor
    > >
    > >
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 5:02 pm
  #10  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Follow the region specific instruction from here:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/applications/fc.html

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Art" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:Tgucb.17059$TM4.14272@pd7tw2no...
    > Andrew,
    > A questions about notorization. Do all other photocopied documents that
are
    > in english (ie. sponsor's/applicant's passport & passport stamp pages,
    > marriage certificate, birth certificate, citizenship card) also have to be
    > notorized in the case of a spousal sponsored PR visa application from
    > abroad, or is it only translated documents that have to be notorized?
    > THAnks
    > Art
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BZlcb.1159$t7.120@edtnps84...
    > > Certified or Registered Translators passed licensing requirements in
their
    > > jurisdiction to practice as such and to use title and seal or stamp of
    > > Certified or Registered or Licensed Translator. You haven't.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > for documents that were originally written in other than English or
    > > French,
    > > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation
will
    > > be
    > > > accepted by CIC?
    > > >
    > > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional
    > translation
    > > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive.
And
    > > most
    > > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone
who
    > > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow
I
    > > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many
of
    > > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce
    > meaningless
    > > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > > >
    > > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as
the
    > > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is
    > accurate.
    > > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different
    > way.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Zsombor
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Sep 24th 2003, 10:40 pm
  #11  
Tom
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Follow the visa office specific instructions. BUT, for Canadian
citizenship applications, any supporting documents that the applicant
submits which had been issued in languages other than English or
French must be accompanied by a translation into one of Canada's two
official languages. The translation can be made by anyone other than a
family member. However, the translator must sign an affidavit in front
of an officer at a Canadian Embassy or Consulate or in front of a
notary public certifying that they are responsible for the
translation.

Here is CIC's policy about citizenship applications:

" A citizenship applicant who provides documents in a language other
than French or English must submit a copy of the original document and
a copy of the French or English translation of the document with the
application. The applicant must also supply an affidavit from the
translator.

Who may translate document
**************************

Any person, other than a family member may translate a document in
support of a citizenship application. A family member is defined for
the purposes of this policy as being a: parent, guardian, sibling,
spouse, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first
cousin. This policy applies to an applicant's spouse (if applicable)
as well. i.e. a spouse's brother, sister, etc. cannot translate a
document for an applicant".

HTH. Tom


"Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > for documents that were originally written in other than English or French,
    > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will be
    > accepted by CIC?
    >
    > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional translation
    > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And most
    > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
    > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
    > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
    > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce meaningless
    > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    >
    > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
    > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is accurate.
    > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different way.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Zsombor
 
Old Oct 7th 2003, 7:06 am
  #12  
Jeni
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What is certified translation?

Hi,

I've been doing a thread search on certified translations and what CIC
accepts etc. I understand that they require certified translations
(not necessarily notarized) of all original document currently not in
either English or French. That is clear.

My question is--can the translation be done abroad, or must it be done
by a Canadian certifed translator? Would using the services of the
Slovak Consulate in Ottawa be acceptable?

[email protected] (Tom) wrote in message news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > Follow the visa office specific instructions. BUT, for Canadian
    > citizenship applications, any supporting documents that the applicant
    > submits which had been issued in languages other than English or
    > French must be accompanied by a translation into one of Canada's two
    > official languages. The translation can be made by anyone other than a
    > family member. However, the translator must sign an affidavit in front
    > of an officer at a Canadian Embassy or Consulate or in front of a
    > notary public certifying that they are responsible for the
    > translation.
    >
    > Here is CIC's policy about citizenship applications:
    >
    > " A citizenship applicant who provides documents in a language other
    > than French or English must submit a copy of the original document and
    > a copy of the French or English translation of the document with the
    > application. The applicant must also supply an affidavit from the
    > translator.
    >
    > Who may translate document
    > **************************
    >
    > Any person, other than a family member may translate a document in
    > support of a citizenship application. A family member is defined for
    > the purposes of this policy as being a: parent, guardian, sibling,
    > spouse, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first
    > cousin. This policy applies to an applicant's spouse (if applicable)
    > as well. i.e. a spouse's brother, sister, etc. cannot translate a
    > document for an applicant".
    >
    > HTH. Tom
    >
    >
    > "Zsombor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<1064429792.75042@sj-nntpcache-5>...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > for documents that were originally written in other than English or French,
    > > a translation is required. How can I make sure that the translation will be
    > > accepted by CIC?
    > >
    > > Obviously, there are people/companies who provide professional translation
    > > services, but they are rare (for my language anyway) and expensive. And most
    > > importantly I don't see what makes them more "official" than anyone who
    > > speaks English (for example me . Is there maybe a register for
    > > "authorized" translators and CIC checks if I used one of them? Somehow I
    > > doubt it... Not to mention that anecdotal evidence suggests that many of
    > > these "professional" translators are idiots and often produce meaningless
    > > mirror translations if they are not familiar with the content.
    > >
    > > Now, I've heard before that any translation is acceptable as long as the
    > > translator signs a notarized statement saying the translation is accurate.
    > > This sounds too good to be true, so I was wondering if anyone cares to
    > > comment on it, or suggest a way to address this issue in a different way.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Zsombor
 

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