Visitor visa refused

Old Aug 25th 2003, 4:47 am
  #1  
Nooor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Visitor visa refused

I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
of an issued temporary-residency-permit!

Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
the expiry of an issued permit?

Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 5:06 am
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Yes, you may post a bond (several thousands of $), but in many cases it will
not help.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 5:24 am
  #3  
James Metcalfe
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Posting a bond is no solution. I would obtain a copy of the CAIPS notes to
see what the Visa Officers impressions or concerens were and then try to
address the concerens in a new application. Without knowing the details of
the person and application it is impossible to predict the real reasons for
the refusal.


JIm Metcalfe




"Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 6:39 am
  #4  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Bond is the only possible guarantee original poster asked for - there are no
other guarantees inviting person can provide.

And as I already mentioned declaration of posting a bond will never
guarantee that visa will be granted, but may help if the reason for refusal
is exactly as stated by original poster. Checking CAIPS notes is a must
before next move.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:wGr2b.10796$1%[email protected]...
    > Posting a bond is no solution. I would obtain a copy of the CAIPS notes to
    > see what the Visa Officers impressions or concerens were and then try to
    > address the concerens in a new application. Without knowing the details of
    > the person and application it is impossible to predict the real reasons
for
    > the refusal.
    > JIm Metcalfe
    > "Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > >
    > > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > >
    > > Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 9:41 am
  #5  
James Metcalfe
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Andrew

Can you refer me to the procedures for posting a bond in a Visitor visa
application. Having never done one I am always eager to learn. To my
knowledge there is no authority to demand a bond from a visitor except in
rare ocassions at a port of entry and this is normally for someone to be
realeased form detention. Please enlighten us all.

James Metcalfe (not James Bond)




"Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 10:35 am
  #6  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Sorry, but I can't as I never done it either. This is why I wrote that bond
is only a possibility, not a guarantee of admission.

Just last June person called me here in Vancouver asking how he can get his
bond back if he sponsors his wife inland. She gained admission after he
posted $5,000 bond, then they got married and now he wants his money back. I
honestly advised him to read conditions of his bond and contact someone
experienced with such bonds as I have none.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Andrew
    > Can you refer me to the procedures for posting a bond in a Visitor visa
    > application. Having never done one I am always eager to learn. To my
    > knowledge there is no authority to demand a bond from a visitor except in
    > rare ocassions at a port of entry and this is normally for someone to be
    > realeased form detention. Please enlighten us all.
    > James Metcalfe (not James Bond)
    > "Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > >
    > > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > >
    > > Thanks for the help.
 
Old Aug 26th 2003, 12:45 am
  #7  
James Metcalfe
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

There was a proposal to take bonds for granting visas when thee was a doubt
about bona fides of aplpicants in the run up to IRPA but it was discarded.
Your caller will not get his bond back until he lands at which time he can
apply to the rnforcement unit for a refund provided he has complied with all
the Terms and Conditions of his release and bond such as reporting etc..
etc..

Jim Metcalfe




"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:qaw2b.52769$K44.8172@edtnps84...
    > Sorry, but I can't as I never done it either. This is why I wrote that
bond
    > is only a possibility, not a guarantee of admission.
    > Just last June person called me here in Vancouver asking how he can get
his
    > bond back if he sponsors his wife inland. She gained admission after he
    > posted $5,000 bond, then they got married and now he wants his money back.
I
    > honestly advised him to read conditions of his bond and contact someone
    > experienced with such bonds as I have none.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > ________________________________
    > "James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Andrew
    > >
    > > Can you refer me to the procedures for posting a bond in a Visitor visa
    > > application. Having never done one I am always eager to learn. To my
    > > knowledge there is no authority to demand a bond from a visitor except
in
    > > rare ocassions at a port of entry and this is normally for someone to be
    > > realeased form detention. Please enlighten us all.
    > >
    > > James Metcalfe (not James Bond)
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > > > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > > > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > > > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > > >
    > > > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > > > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > > > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks for the help.
    > >
    > >
 
Old Aug 28th 2003, 2:24 am
  #8  
Nooor
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Thank you for information.
In the refusal letter that was sent to the applicant, the ONLY reason
that was provided for the negative decision was the "suspicion" of the
visa officer that the applicant may not leave Canada after the expiry
of his visa. It is disturbing that an application can simply be
refused based solely on the "personal" subjective judgment, and maybe
also the whims, of an individual. The applicant has presented all the
listed visa requirements in his application, he NEVER intended to
overstay or in any manner violate an authorized visa. All that was
intended was to spend a couple of weeks in Canada for social reasons
and to see the country.


"James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > There was a proposal to take bonds for granting visas when thee was a doubt
    > about bona fides of aplpicants in the run up to IRPA but it was discarded.
    > Your caller will not get his bond back until he lands at which time he can
    > apply to the rnforcement unit for a refund provided he has complied with all
    > the Terms and Conditions of his release and bond such as reporting etc..
    > etc..
    >
    > Jim Metcalfe
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:qaw2b.52769$K44.8172@edtnps84...
    > > Sorry, but I can't as I never done it either. This is why I wrote that
    > bond
    > > is only a possibility, not a guarantee of admission.
    > >
    > > Just last June person called me here in Vancouver asking how he can get
    > his
    > > bond back if he sponsors his wife inland. She gained admission after he
    > > posted $5,000 bond, then they got married and now he wants his money back.
    > I
    > > honestly advised him to read conditions of his bond and contact someone
    > > experienced with such bonds as I have none.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Andrew
    > > >
    > > > Can you refer me to the procedures for posting a bond in a Visitor visa
    > > > application. Having never done one I am always eager to learn. To my
    > > > knowledge there is no authority to demand a bond from a visitor except
    > in
    > > > rare ocassions at a port of entry and this is normally for someone to be
    > > > realeased form detention. Please enlighten us all.
    > > >
    > > > James Metcalfe (not James Bond)
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > > > > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > > > > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > > > > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > > > >
    > > > > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > > > > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > > > > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks for the help.
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Aug 28th 2003, 4:52 am
  #9  
Webcrawler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Nooor --

Unfortunately, this is the way most countrys' visa procedure works,
including USA, UK, etc.
Mere suspicion or "subjective judgement" on the part of the consular
officer is enough to reject the visa.

Your relative needs to prove sufficient and binding ties to the home
country.
Such ties need to be clear, tangible and substantiable (like house,
car, job, family ties, bank account, property, etc.).

HTH

[email protected] (Nooor) wrote in message news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > Thank you for information.
    > In the refusal letter that was sent to the applicant, the ONLY reason
    > that was provided for the negative decision was the "suspicion" of the
    > visa officer that the applicant may not leave Canada after the expiry
    > of his visa. It is disturbing that an application can simply be
    > refused based solely on the "personal" subjective judgment, and maybe
    > also the whims, of an individual. The applicant has presented all the
    > listed visa requirements in his application, he NEVER intended to
    > overstay or in any manner violate an authorized visa. All that was
    > intended was to spend a couple of weeks in Canada for social reasons
    > and to see the country.
    >
    >
    > "James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > There was a proposal to take bonds for granting visas when thee was a doubt
    > > about bona fides of aplpicants in the run up to IRPA but it was discarded.
    > > Your caller will not get his bond back until he lands at which time he can
    > > apply to the rnforcement unit for a refund provided he has complied with all
    > > the Terms and Conditions of his release and bond such as reporting etc..
    > > etc..
    > >
    > > Jim Metcalfe
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:qaw2b.52769$K44.8172@edtnps84...
    > > > Sorry, but I can't as I never done it either. This is why I wrote that
    > bond
    > > > is only a possibility, not a guarantee of admission.
    > > >
    > > > Just last June person called me here in Vancouver asking how he can get
    > his
    > > > bond back if he sponsors his wife inland. She gained admission after he
    > > > posted $5,000 bond, then they got married and now he wants his money back.
    > I
    > > > honestly advised him to read conditions of his bond and contact someone
    > > > experienced with such bonds as I have none.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > >
    > > > ../..
    > > >
    > > > Andrew Miller
    > > > Immigration Consultant
    > > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > > email: [email protected]
    > > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > > ________________________________
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "James Metcalfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Andrew
    > > > >
    > > > > Can you refer me to the procedures for posting a bond in a Visitor visa
    > > > > application. Having never done one I am always eager to learn. To my
    > > > > knowledge there is no authority to demand a bond from a visitor except
    > in
    > > > > rare ocassions at a port of entry and this is normally for someone to be
    > > > > realeased form detention. Please enlighten us all.
    > > > >
    > > > > James Metcalfe (not James Bond)
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "Nooor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > I have invited a relative of mine to visit me in Canada (I'm a
    > > > > > Canadian Citizen). The visa application was refused on the ground that
    > > > > > there is a fear the applicant might not leave Canada after the expiry
    > > > > > of an issued temporary-residency-permit!
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Is there a procedure that I can use to provide a satisfactory
    > > > > > guarantee to the visa post that the applicant will leave Canada before
    > > > > > the expiry of an issued permit?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks for the help.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
 
Old Aug 28th 2003, 1:00 pm
  #10  
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Default Re: Visitor visa refused

Originally posted by Nooor
It is disturbing that an application can simply be refused based solely on the "personal" subjective judgment, and maybe also the whims, of an individual.
Nooor,

When applying for a visitor visa for any particular country, especially a western country, you should always keep in mind that the applicant is presumed to be a potential immigrant unless there is proof indicating otherwise.

Don't be surprised that even with a valid visitor visa, the holder may still be subjected to an extensive grilling by Canadian customs officer at POE. The story doesn't end at the visa-issuing embassy.

Peter
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