Two passports in different names?

Old Mar 7th 2017, 2:51 pm
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 16
FishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Two passports in different names?

I'm Canadian and my surname is impossible to read, spell or pronounce. I'd really like to change it to an English name.

However, I still have citizenship (and thus a separate legal name) of the country where I was born. This country allows name changes only in extremely limited circumstances. It takes an Act of Parliament to change someone's name, and in many cases the public prosecutor will open an official investigation to interview people, etc. (I'm not making this up !)

When I change my legal name in Canada, the legal name in my birth country will not (and cannot) change. As far as I'm aware, this is not illegal. Canada doesn't care about what my birth country believes my name to be. And the other way around. Nothing I can do about it anyway.

So when I apply for passports, they'll be in different names. Is this likely to 'get me into trouble', or result in additional scrutiny?

Right now, my birth country does not require Canadians to apply for a visa or ETA. But imagine this changes in the future - which passport would I use for airline check-in?
FishAndChips00 is offline  
Old Mar 7th 2017, 9:02 pm
  #2  
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Somewhere between Vancouver & St Johns
Posts: 19,881
Former Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond reputeFormer Lancastrian has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Think about it logically.
Im pretty sure a lot of people from a number of countries have surnames that are hard to spell or pronounce.
Now with you having dual citizenship and holding 2 x passports thats OK as long as in the same name.
Now imagine travelling with both passports in different names ya think that might cause a few problems when crossing international borders and an officer sees both passports in different names. Im guessing you are not a Jason Bourne type of person.
My advice is stick with one name unless you want to go through all the hassle of changing names.
Former Lancastrian is offline  
Old Mar 8th 2017, 1:19 am
  #3  
Concierge
 
SchnookoLoly's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Oakville, ON, CA
Posts: 8,320
SchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

I actually have experience of this.

I was born in Canada. Not real names, but for simplicity, say my name is Schnooks Loly Smith. First name Schnooks, middle name Loly, last name Smith.

Loly is also my mom's maiden name. Both my brother and I have it as middle names.

My mom was born in Portugal, so a few years ago when I decided to move to the UK, I went through the process of getting my Portuguese passport sorted.

Portuguese naming law is different to most other countries. They don't recognize middle names, and last names are always two-part: your mother's maiden name, and then either yuor father or your husband's surname. So when I got my Portuguese passport, it was issued as "Loly Smith, Schnooks" - first name Schnooks, last name Loly Smith.

I didn't think much of it at the time... booked my flight to the UK and off I went.

But holy crap the problems it caused me in the next 5 years while I was living in the UK.

I have obviously never been known as "Loly Smith" as my last name, but all of a sudden, now all my legal paperwork in the UK is as Loly Smith, since I entered as an EU citizen and not as a Canadian. Flights were a pain in the ass. I still used just Schnooks Smith as that's what I'd always gone by, but when booking flights I always had to be so careful about which name I was booking under as it depended on which passport I was using. Once I made an error and booked on the Portuguese name on a trip back to Canada when connecting in the US, and TSA gave me a hell of a time about the fact that my passports didn't match.

When I got married, I purposely changed my Canadian passport first. I became Schnooks Loly Green. First name Schnooks, middle name Loly, last name Green. Smith was dropped. When I went to change my Portuguese one, I specifically asked them to make the name match my Canadian passport as that's what I've always been known as,a nd having the two passports in different names was causing headaches.

No dice. New passport issued first name Schnooks, last name Loly Green. Sigh.

Then came the time to get my UK citizenship. I was applying on the grounds that I met the residency requirements as an EU citizen resident in the UK, but I really wanted my UK citizenship issued in my Canadian name, not my Portuguese name. I wrote a separate letter explaining this, said I'd always been known as my Canadian name and still used it (backed up by my letter from my employer in my Canadian name) and luckily they issued my UK citizenship in my Canadian name. Yay.

You'd think I'd be done with it, but no.

When I applied for my first UK passport, one of the requirements was to supply all valid other passports, so I had to supply both my Canadian and my Portuguese one. Which showed different names.

The UK then said they couldn't issue me a passport because my names did not match, and it was their policy not to issue passports under these circumstances and I'd have to show proof that I'd applied to have my name changed in Portugal in order for them to issue my passport. Hi, stress levels! I wrote a long response stating what I wrote above - Portuguese naming convention doesn't allow it, I have already tried, there's nothing I can do to change it, and because I've always been known by the Canadian version of my name I was not about to change that. They'd already issued my citizenship certificate in my Canadian name as well, so clearly someone was fine with it since they knew about it when I first applied.

They did eventually issue my UK passport in my Canadian name, but there's a nice big note in my UK passport that says "Also known as Loly Green, Schnooks".

Whenever I fill out official forms that ask if I've been known as any other name, I always have to remember to fill out BOTH version of my Portuguese name there, pre- and post-marriage.

Honestly, it's a pain in the ass.

I haven't decided whether or not I'll keep my Portuguese passport up to date. I was planning on just letting it lapse (not renounce, just not bother renewing my passport) because it causes more problems than it's worth, but now with Brexit, I feel like I probably should keep it valid, just in case.

So my suggestion, either go through the process of changing your name in your home country, or just leave the names matching even though it's a bit of a headache.

(One option is something my mom's friend did. She's Croatian, and her last name is spelled the Croatian way but it's 7 letters with no vowels, so it's rather difficult to work out how to pronounce, it basically just looks like someone mashed their keyboard and called it a name. She uses a "social" version of her last name, basically just spelled phonetically, in everyday life - social media, work, etc - and just leaves the official spelling for legal stuff like her bank accounts and travel and such. Other than giving someone else a heads up if someone else is booking flights for her, she doesn't find that it bothers her at all or really gets in the way. So that's another option.)
SchnookoLoly is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 6:34 am
  #4  
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Almost Canadian's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: South of Calgary
Posts: 13,381
Almost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond reputeAlmost Canadian has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by Former Lancastrian
Think about it logically.
Im pretty sure a lot of people from a number of countries have surnames that are hard to spell or pronounce.
Now with you having dual citizenship and holding 2 x passports thats OK as long as in the same name.
Now imagine travelling with both passports in different names ya think that might cause a few problems when crossing international borders and an officer sees both passports in different names. Im guessing you are not a Jason Bourne type of person.
My advice is stick with one name unless you want to go through all the hassle of changing names.
Or one can simply show the intellectually challenged border guard that you have a legal document issued in one jurisdiction that demonstrates why the names are different.

Hopefully, one will be allowed to proceed without being tasered
Almost Canadian is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 7:10 am
  #5  
Assimilated Pauper
 
dbd33's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 40,023
dbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by Former Lancastrian
Think about it logically.
Im pretty sure a lot of people from a number of countries have surnames that are hard to spell or pronounce.
Now with you having dual citizenship and holding 2 x passports thats OK as long as in the same name.
Now imagine travelling with both passports in different names ya think that might cause a few problems when crossing international borders and an officer sees both passports in different names. Im guessing you are not a Jason Bourne type of person.
My advice is stick with one name unless you want to go through all the hassle of changing names.
My children have different names in their different passports, the circumstances are much as described above. I don't think it's ever caused a problem as they only show their Canadians ones to the Canadian authorities, otherwise they use the Swiss ones and they know to have tickets issued to match the Swiss ones.
dbd33 is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 7:20 am
  #6  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 16
FishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

DBD33, suppose the ticket was issued in their Swiss name. So what passport do they use on the return leg, checking in flying back to Canada ? They can't use their Swiss pp, as that would require an ETA, which they're not eligible for. So they'd be forced to show their CDN pp in a different name to the check in agent ?
FishAndChips00 is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 7:30 am
  #7  
Concierge
 
SchnookoLoly's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Oakville, ON, CA
Posts: 8,320
SchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond reputeSchnookoLoly has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by FishAndChips00
DBD33, suppose the ticket was issued in their Swiss name. So what passport do they use on the return leg, checking in flying back to Canada ? They can't use their Swiss pp, as that would require an ETA, which they're not eligible for. So they'd be forced to show their CDN pp in a different name to the check in agent ?
When living in the UK on my PT passport and flying to Canada for a visit, I booked in my Canadian name. I used my Canadian passport to check in on both legs of the flight, and only showed my PT passport when it was time to cross the border into the UK.

In the scenario you describe above, I would personally make the booking using the CA passport. Pretty much zero chance of being denied boarding on the outgoing flight since CA citizens don't need a visa to enter Switzerland, and then on the return flight it's just a CA passport returning to Canada.

On the first visit home from the UK to Canada, I was flying via the US and booked my flight on my PT passport, the one in a different name. When I got to the check-in desk they asked where my visa was, and I said I had a Canadian passport and didn't need a visa, they said oh, no problem then, and just let me board. I had the same conversation with US customs on the other side (since my CA passport didn't match my flight info) but they let me through with no problem. Then no issue at all returning to the UK since that was on an EU passport.
SchnookoLoly is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 7:49 am
  #8  
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 12,830
Aviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by FishAndChips00
DBD33, suppose the ticket was issued in their Swiss name. So what passport do they use on the return leg, checking in flying back to Canada ? They can't use their Swiss pp, as that would require an ETA, which they're not eligible for. So they'd be forced to show their CDN pp in a different name to the check in agent ?
If your flight ticket does not match the passport name, it is likley to cause no end of grief. My suggestion would be to use one passport. I would not be looking at ways to complicate things.

Carrying two passports can look dodgy if they are in different names. You may get fed up trying to explain yourself and possibly re-booking flights. Your travel insurance won't cover missed flights in these circumstances.

I only ever used a Canadian passport, I dropped the UK one as soon as it expired. Getting on and off the flight was never much of an issue though, the flight was going nowhere without me!
Aviator is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 7:59 am
  #9  
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Gozit's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Location: SW Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,960
Gozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by SchnookoLoly
I actually have experience of this.

I was born in Canada. Not real names, but for simplicity, say my name is Schnooks Loly Smith. First name Schnooks, middle name Loly, last name Smith.

Loly is also my mom's maiden name. Both my brother and I have it as middle names.

My mom was born in Portugal, so a few years ago when I decided to move to the UK, I went through the process of getting my Portuguese passport sorted.

Portuguese naming law is different to most other countries. They don't recognize middle names, and last names are always two-part: your mother's maiden name, and then either yuor father or your husband's surname. So when I got my Portuguese passport, it was issued as "Loly Smith, Schnooks" - first name Schnooks, last name Loly Smith.

I didn't think much of it at the time... booked my flight to the UK and off I went.

But holy crap the problems it caused me in the next 5 years while I was living in the UK.

I have obviously never been known as "Loly Smith" as my last name, but all of a sudden, now all my legal paperwork in the UK is as Loly Smith, since I entered as an EU citizen and not as a Canadian. Flights were a pain in the ass. I still used just Schnooks Smith as that's what I'd always gone by, but when booking flights I always had to be so careful about which name I was booking under as it depended on which passport I was using. Once I made an error and booked on the Portuguese name on a trip back to Canada when connecting in the US, and TSA gave me a hell of a time about the fact that my passports didn't match.

When I got married, I purposely changed my Canadian passport first. I became Schnooks Loly Green. First name Schnooks, middle name Loly, last name Green. Smith was dropped. When I went to change my Portuguese one, I specifically asked them to make the name match my Canadian passport as that's what I've always been known as,a nd having the two passports in different names was causing headaches.

No dice. New passport issued first name Schnooks, last name Loly Green. Sigh.

Then came the time to get my UK citizenship. I was applying on the grounds that I met the residency requirements as an EU citizen resident in the UK, but I really wanted my UK citizenship issued in my Canadian name, not my Portuguese name. I wrote a separate letter explaining this, said I'd always been known as my Canadian name and still used it (backed up by my letter from my employer in my Canadian name) and luckily they issued my UK citizenship in my Canadian name. Yay.

You'd think I'd be done with it, but no.

When I applied for my first UK passport, one of the requirements was to supply all valid other passports, so I had to supply both my Canadian and my Portuguese one. Which showed different names.

The UK then said they couldn't issue me a passport because my names did not match, and it was their policy not to issue passports under these circumstances and I'd have to show proof that I'd applied to have my name changed in Portugal in order for them to issue my passport. Hi, stress levels! I wrote a long response stating what I wrote above - Portuguese naming convention doesn't allow it, I have already tried, there's nothing I can do to change it, and because I've always been known by the Canadian version of my name I was not about to change that. They'd already issued my citizenship certificate in my Canadian name as well, so clearly someone was fine with it since they knew about it when I first applied.

They did eventually issue my UK passport in my Canadian name, but there's a nice big note in my UK passport that says "Also known as Loly Green, Schnooks".

Whenever I fill out official forms that ask if I've been known as any other name, I always have to remember to fill out BOTH version of my Portuguese name there, pre- and post-marriage.

Honestly, it's a pain in the ass.

I haven't decided whether or not I'll keep my Portuguese passport up to date. I was planning on just letting it lapse (not renounce, just not bother renewing my passport) because it causes more problems than it's worth, but now with Brexit, I feel like I probably should keep it valid, just in case.

So my suggestion, either go through the process of changing your name in your home country, or just leave the names matching even though it's a bit of a headache.

(One option is something my mom's friend did. She's Croatian, and her last name is spelled the Croatian way but it's 7 letters with no vowels, so it's rather difficult to work out how to pronounce, it basically just looks like someone mashed their keyboard and called it a name. She uses a "social" version of her last name, basically just spelled phonetically, in everyday life - social media, work, etc - and just leaves the official spelling for legal stuff like her bank accounts and travel and such. Other than giving someone else a heads up if someone else is booking flights for her, she doesn't find that it bothers her at all or really gets in the way. So that's another option.)


Originally Posted by FishAndChips00
DBD33, suppose the ticket was issued in their Swiss name. So what passport do they use on the return leg, checking in flying back to Canada ? They can't use their Swiss pp, as that would require an ETA, which they're not eligible for. So they'd be forced to show their CDN pp in a different name to the check in agent ?

If you have 2 different names like you are proposing, as Schnooks does, i would do it this way:

Book all flights under Canadian passport, in your Canadian name.

When you check in at the airport for your flight to home country - check in using Canadian passport. If there are any discrepancies regarding visa requirements and you need to prove to the check in agent that you have citizenship in your home country, just show them that passport.

When you get to your home country, show them your home country passport.

Returning to Canada, check in with your Canadian passport

Exiting your home country at passport control show the home country passport.

Entering Canada again, obviously Canadian passport.

Always carry your Canadian change of name certificate with you when travelling so you have proof your name was changed in Canada from name A (home country passport) to name B (Canadian passport.)

That is how I would approach this. Good luck...
Gozit is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 11:04 am
  #10  
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 12,830
Aviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond reputeAviator has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Where one is a dual national, entering as a Canadian (if this is permissible in that country) may offer some consular assistance in the event of a problem (medical, political, criminal etc.). Entering as a national of that country, will in most cases prevent the Canadian consul from helping.
Aviator is offline  
Old Mar 9th 2017, 2:42 pm
  #11  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 16
FishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond reputeFishAndChips00 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Great post SchnookoLoly. What a hassle !!!
FishAndChips00 is offline  
Old Mar 10th 2017, 2:50 am
  #12  
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Gozit's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Location: SW Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,960
Gozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond reputeGozit has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Two passports in different names?

Originally Posted by Aviator
Where one is a dual national, entering as a Canadian (if this is permissible in that country) may offer some consular assistance in the event of a problem (medical, political, criminal etc.). Entering as a national of that country, will in most cases prevent the Canadian consul from helping.
If you're actually in some legal trouble or whatnot in that country and they find out you are a citizen that entered on their Canadian passport they will likely deny consular assistance.

Depending on his country of origin, which for some reason he won't state, he may also be obligated to enter on that passport. And if its a country where its this hard to change your name I wouldn't be surprised if they wanted him to enter on that passport, not his Canadian one.

IMO if you are a citizen there is no reason not to enter on that passport. In my experience it makes life a lot easier.
Gozit is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.