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Stupid Canadians don't realize why their dollar's sinking fast.

Stupid Canadians don't realize why their dollar's sinking fast.

Old Nov 25th 2001, 1:26 am
  #1  
Robert S.
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Stupid Canadians don't realize why their dollar's sinking fast.

I was on a train from Toronto with this really yakky 20-something Canadian who
apparently didn't get anything from her economics profs or history classes. She was
lamenting the cost of buying "American" things, seems she even got ripped off in
exhanging her Cdn. dollars into US$, at a rate of 1.71 on her last trip (someone got
rich on that one, perhaps the hotel concierge?)

So, I asked the woman: "Don't you realize that every time you send a dollar out of
Canada, you're causing your dollar to decline?" Why, no, I didn't, she declaimed.

I discoursed to her how in some countries, local currencies had devalued by as much
as 98% against the dollar due to wars, revolutions, or simply because the populace
was so "in love" with imported goods, usually American.

To digress a bit, Canadians are very poor marketers and salesmen compared to Yanks,
Brits, or even Chinese. For example, if you wanted to buy a Canadian-made bike lock
and looked in bike shops in Toronto, why, you'd conclude that 'there aren't any'.
Wrong! One of the best bike locks, according to Wired, is the Stocks U-Lock, made in
Bowmanville. Another example: The lowest priced electric vehicle on the market is
made is Toronnnah, the cutsie art deco Feel Good Cars "Dauphin", at $13,000 with a
110KPH top speed; yet, Canucks looking for EV's don't know about it -- why? This EV
maker doesn't know how to blow its own horn.

In another example, the world's best bike horn is the "Air Zounds 2" made in
Torontaah, selling for an incredumulous US$11. After hearing lots of good things
about this air horn from my Americahn bike pals, who said the Air Zounds saved
their lives, I found the Zounds nearly impossible to buy in Canada; local stores
don't stock it!

Yup, Canucks like to holiday in the Wintah to the U.S. and Club Med points, and
watch, their dollah's gonna' toss some more, in a perfect storm, yet these Canadians
still don't get it: Every time you spend those Loonies in Lisbon, youh dollah's
gonna' get the skewered lika sum whitefish on a trapnet.

Well, after about half an hour of giving this yakky young lady historical examples,
she finally got it: She said she'd travel to Vancouver instead next time. Why, she
even recalled how scary her trips to Buffalo NY had been: Checking into a motel, the
proprietor held a shotgun until she said they were Canadians. (Apparently, in
Buffalo, NY, Col. Custer's still fightin' dem Indians, or sumptin.) So's I explained
that crack cocaine makes addicts crazy, crazy enuf to shoot up police stations --
next time you visit the east side, count da numbers of bullet pock marks on every
Buffalo police station.

So, we drifted in and out of the topic of why the Canadian Dollar's been taking a
swan dive into the currency abyss. What's odd about it is that NO EDITORIALS TALK
ABOUT THE SOLUTION: BUYING CANADIAN AND KEEPING THE DOLLARS IN CANADA. Checking out
the Canadian papers, I found the papers to be supported by car dealers' ads. Most
newspapers have a "Wheels" or "auto" section so large its bigger than the news.
Evidently, these newspapers don't dare offend their advertisers: Japanese, Swedish,
Korean, and German carmakers. (Canadian car plants are being moved faster to Mexico
than you'd get diarrhea from a Cancun buffet.)

In my opinion, the only people to blame are the lousy economics profs in Canadian
universities and the lame duck newpaper editors. The Canadian people are simply the
victims of dis-information (newspapers travel supplements extolling the virtues of
travel to Melbourne; same newspapers getting advertising moolah from agencies and
airlines.)

Will Canadians, concerned or otherwise ever wake up? Nah, Trudeau's dead, and the
rest have fog-bound brains, its amazing they can find their way to the bathroom
without a guide dog.

It's hopeless Canadians, do what Conrad Black did, move out!
 
Old Nov 25th 2001, 3:21 am
  #2  
Udo Zallmann
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What does that have to do with immigration to Canada?

udo

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Old Nov 26th 2001, 2:31 pm
  #3  
Mark Pan
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in article [email protected], Udo Zallmann at
[email protected] wrote on 11/26/01 12:21 AM:

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[usenetquote2]>> [Rant about Canadian marketing deficiencies][/usenetquote2]
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Was just thinking, if all immigrants started to buy Canadian, wouldn't that help the
local economy?

I come from Malaysia, and the local economy there is in a lot better shape than some
of its neighbours simply because the people are rather proud of their own
Malaysian-made products and prefer to buy them.

On another note I bought the Air Zound 2 too (here in Singapore) and I agree that its
a "best in the world" product. Its available in almost all the bike shops I know

Mark Pan

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but at least we knew the century was going to end.'" (Author Douglas Adams, on the
Y2K problem)
 
Old Nov 28th 2001, 12:38 am
  #4  
Gogo
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Really?

Don't play smart!

I was really amazed when once in a chat a German guy told a Canadian that the
exchange rate of the German mark to the Canadian dollar has been very good and that
made the German very happy while he was on a trip to Vancouver. The Canuck humbly
said that the Loonie was weak to any currency...

In fact in the past couple of years Canadian dollar has devaluated with about 25% the
same percentage the Euro has devaluated, and less than Aussie or Kiwi dollars did.

Well... do Aussies or Europeans come to buy bikes from Buffalo? Why are their
currencies falling?

I am not an economist, I don't really know why the US dollar is so strong. But I
remember president Bush - the father making visits to Japan to ask the Japs to
support the falling dollar...
 
Old Nov 28th 2001, 2:45 am
  #5  
The Wizzard
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yeah the US dollar isnt the be all and end all nof currency. take Sterling for
instance, you get $1.42 for your £ , so in effect the US dollar is to sterling what
the Can$ is to US$.

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Old Nov 28th 2001, 8:49 am
  #6  
Stuart
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The biggest factor is *confidence*. A country which defines its own fiscal policy,
sticks to it and gets results will have a strong currency. Countries like my own
Canada which rides on the coat tails of the US economy, without a strong and
independent fiscal policy will have a declining exchange rate. Consumer purchase of
"made at home" products will certainly help the confidence factor, but unless that's
the result of strong gov't policy, it's barely worth the paper it's written on.

Stuart
 
Old Dec 3rd 2001, 6:50 am
  #7  
Robert Sawatsky
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[email protected] (Robert S.)
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If the above is generally true, then trade deficit/surplus is the primary indicator
of currency value. If that is true then the US dollar should be in the falling and
the Canadian dollar rising. I believe currency valuation and exchange rates are much
more complex than the simple movement of the currency.
 

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