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Spanners in the immigration works?

Spanners in the immigration works?

Old Aug 31st 2004, 1:00 am
  #1  
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Talking Spanners in the immigration works?

Hi - I have really enjoyed reading through the postings here, but still have a few questions of my own, if anyone is in a position (or has the inclination:-) to help!

We have 78 points at the moment, but have two main problems which may hold us back. These are :

1. My partner suffers from depression
2. He looks after the children, which means that I work, whilst he is recovering.

However, this means that, although he has earned well in a respected job in the past, he is currently unemployed. I am working, have degree qualifications and we have very healthy savings/assets between us. Do we still have a chance? Many thanks in advance, Neida
Also - would studying for an Msc in a Canadian university LONG DISTANCE (ie., from UK) go anywhere in our favour? Must know soon!!!

.
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 1:16 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Hi Neida,

How many points do you have if you are the main applicant, and your partner is the spouse (Canada is a modern country )?

Also if your partner has worked for 4 years in an NOC job within the past 10 years I am not sure how much not being employed at this time will effect the assessment. Perhaps someone else can comment on this.
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 1:37 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Originally Posted by mhhp
Hi Neida,

How many points do you have if you are the main applicant, and your partner is the spouse (Canada is a modern country )?

Also if your partner has worked for 4 years in an NOC job within the past 10 years I am not sure how much not being employed at this time will effect the assessment. Perhaps someone else can comment on this.
Thanks for replying (it's great to feel there's someone out there!)

Well we either have 75 points if my partner's first year credit studying law doesn't count, and all 75 points are mine. If his year does count, then we have 78 points, 3 of which are his. I worked as a translator for 10 years, although my degree is in psychology and I now work as an autism practitioner. It would seem that Canada doesn't recognise adult autism (strange but true!) so I have will have to revert back to my old job. Both of us are quite happy to work in Bob's Burger Bar if we get over there - we're not fussy! Still not sure where that leave us though.

Pushing my luck, I know - but any call on the long distance learning front? lol
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 2:08 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

It looks like the main impediment in your case would be your partner's clinical depression. That would have to be thoroughly investigated during the immigration medical examination. There is no way to be sure in advance what the outcome would be as each case is different and only the CICs doctors can make the recommendation. That means that you would have to apply to find out, unfortunately.


Originally Posted by Neida Visa
Thanks for replying (it's great to feel there's someone out there!)

Well we either have 75 points if my partner's first year credit studying law doesn't count, and all 75 points are mine. If his year does count, then we have 78 points, 3 of which are his. I worked as a translator for 10 years, although my degree is in psychology and I now work as an autism practitioner. It would seem that Canada doesn't recognise adult autism (strange but true!) so I have will have to revert back to my old job. Both of us are quite happy to work in Bob's Burger Bar if we get over there - we're not fussy! Still not sure where that leave us though.

Pushing my luck, I know - but any call on the long distance learning front? lol
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 2:44 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Many thanks for your reply Jim - I had a feeling that this would be the case. Imagine getting through everything and then failing on the medical? Is it worth it?
Yours glumly
Neida
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 3:45 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Originally Posted by Neida Visa
Many thanks for your reply Jim - I had a feeling that this would be the case. Imagine getting through everything and then failing on the medical? Is it worth it?
Yours glumly
Neida
Depends how much you want to live in canada and how strongly motivated you are!

I dont really know, but for my 2c, I wouldnt have thought depression was a major drain on canadian healthcare. Most of the expense, Drugs, Councelling etc are not covered by provincial programs anyway, so the major difficulty may be arranging insurance coverage for a preexisting condition if you are able to get here.

Good luck, hopefully someone who has applied in the same situation may see the post and reply, but as Jim says, at the end of the day it is at the discression of the MO, so it will be a gamble, but then that is true of emmigration in general.

Iain
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 4:59 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Its a judgement call. It depends on the actual circumstances of the medical condition and the likely prognosis.

Originally Posted by Neida Visa
Many thanks for your reply Jim - I had a feeling that this would be the case. Imagine getting through everything and then failing on the medical? Is it worth it?
Yours glumly
Neida
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 5:35 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

I agree, it's a tough one to call, but we would rather take the chance and regret it, than not try at all (Better to have loved and lost, etc...lol). I've read every book/website and magazine on emigrating to Canada with growing anticipation, and haven't felt this alive since I discovered menthol insoles for my daughter's trainers.
I should really get out more.
Thanks, Neida
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 7:28 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Originally Posted by Neida Visa
I agree, it's a tough one to call, but we would rather take the chance and regret it, than not try at all (Better to have loved and lost, etc...lol). I've read every book/website and magazine on emigrating to Canada with growing anticipation, and haven't felt this alive since I discovered menthol insoles for my daughter's trainers.
I should really get out more.
Thanks, Neida
Growing anticipation? If I read every site & article on immigrating to Canada before I came over it would have been with growing trepedation!

Good luck, I admire your enthusiasm, I hope it lasts!

Iain
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Old Aug 31st 2004, 7:13 pm
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

Many of us understand and share your excitement. Hang in there, afterall Canada may be the best treatment for depression.

There are alot of us out here hanging between hope, (im)patience and desperation.

Good luck
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Old Sep 1st 2004, 8:12 pm
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

lol - that's exactly what my partner believes; catch 22 - Canada will most likely help alleviate the symptoms, but we may not get in because of them. Still, we'll give it our best shot, and, failing that, go to plan B - which involves using a map, cocktail stick and a blindfold).

Many thanks for your positive comments - they are much appreciated !

Neida
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Old Sep 3rd 2004, 6:47 am
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Default Re: Spanners in the immigration works?

I am not a doctor, or immigration officer, but your partner must cope pretty well to be able to look after your children. People can earn good money for being a child carer, house keeper, staying at home and looking after children is not an easy task for male or female. Being a "stay at home parent" is rare these days and one your hsuband should be proud of.
If you stayed at home and he went out to work or you suffered postnatal depression, would people look at it the same way?

Hopefully your husband will recover. Some people suffer depression in silence, if your husband is seeking help then he stands a good chance of getting better. Having a goal like emigrating may give him something to focus on.

We had doubts about this and that, but in the end said that all we had to lose was time( filling in masses of forms) and money (application fee)
The money was less than one holiday to Canada would be.

The only negative things I would say is that they look at your ability to get employment in Canada. In your case you should be OK. In your husbands employment may be difficult. to get. But if your children need child care, and he went out to work. You would have to pay someone else to do it anyway!
Also if something happened that you could not work they may wonder how you would cope.

Most peoples lives are not perfect, as it feels we all have to be to get into another country.

If you don't try you'll never know. We have a plan "B" just incase our application is turned down, only because we know we would be gutted, but will need something else to focus on.
Good luck whatever you decide.

Originally Posted by Neida Visa
Hi - I have really enjoyed reading through the postings here, but still have a few questions of my own, if anyone is in a position (or has the inclination:-) to help!

We have 78 points at the moment, but have two main problems which may hold us back. These are :

1. My partner suffers from depression
2. He looks after the children, which means that I work, whilst he is recovering.

However, this means that, although he has earned well in a respected job in the past, he is currently unemployed. I am working, have degree qualifications and we have very healthy savings/assets between us. Do we still have a chance? Many thanks in advance, Neida
Also - would studying for an Msc in a Canadian university LONG DISTANCE (ie., from UK) go anywhere in our favour? Must know soon!!!

.
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