Which province to move to ??

Old Dec 1st 2004, 5:24 pm
  #1  
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Question Which province to move to ??

Hello friends,

I am thinking of moving to Canada..but not sure which province.
What each province has to offer in terms of job
(Computer professional) and money saving.

I am not going for jolly ride... I mean business
and I want to work.

Some of the concerns are:
- Temperature during mid winter, I am not going to provinces
in the mid to upper range. My experience with cold
is winter in New Hampshire USA.
- I do not have permission to live in QUEBEC : ruled out
- That leaves me with Ontario, Alberta, BC, NS
- Also crime rates in these areas.

Again another thing is cost of housing,
- I can afford from CAN $50K to CAN $100K to buy a decent condo/house
- Big cities such as Toronto, Vancuver, Calgary are far expensive.

Please send your comments.
I am sorry that I had to post here..this is more
active than Lifestyle forum.
newbee is offline  
Old Dec 1st 2004, 8:57 pm
  #2  
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Question Re: Which province to move to ??

Any replies please

Originally Posted by newbee
Hello friends,

I am thinking of moving to Canada..but not sure which province.
What each province has to offer in terms of job
(Computer professional) and money saving.

I am not going for jolly ride... I mean business
and I want to work.

Some of the concerns are:
- Temperature during mid winter, I am not going to provinces
in the mid to upper range. My experience with cold
is winter in New Hampshire USA.
- I do not have permission to live in QUEBEC : ruled out
- That leaves me with Ontario, Alberta, BC, NS
- Also crime rates in these areas.

Again another thing is cost of housing,
- I can afford from CAN $50K to CAN $100K to buy a decent condo/house
- Big cities such as Toronto, Vancuver, Calgary are far expensive.

Please send your comments.
I am sorry that I had to post here..this is more
active than Lifestyle forum.
newbee is offline  
Old Dec 1st 2004, 9:06 pm
  #3  
the-smiths
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Which province to move to ??

I sort of answered a similar question elsewhere, but here it is again:

We can give you a good reason to settle for Ontario, but we might be accused of being biased.......LOL Calgary, Vancouver, and Halifax are all lovely places, but Ontario has so much going for it, especially Toronto, and the surroundings you mentioned.

At the end of the day though, it all comes down to your decision, and where you think you can get a job, and be happy in. My husband is in your line of business too, and you can see pics of him at work, with his new colleagues, celebrating halloween at work.

http://photobucket.com/albums/v171/leoville/

NOTE: Type in christmas as the password to see the pics

A job might start you off on a contract, take it, as it's a way of getting your foot through the door, and once you are in there, you have access to internal job postings and thing like that, that don't get posted externally.


Good luck !

Last edited by the-smiths; Dec 1st 2004 at 9:11 pm.
 
Old Dec 2nd 2004, 1:10 am
  #4  
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Default Re: Which province to move to ??

Originally Posted by newbee
Hello friends,

I am thinking of moving to Canada..but not sure which province.
What each province has to offer in terms of job
(Computer professional) and money saving.

I am not going for jolly ride... I mean business
and I want to work.

Some of the concerns are:
- Temperature during mid winter, I am not going to provinces
in the mid to upper range. My experience with cold
is winter in New Hampshire USA.
- I do not have permission to live in QUEBEC : ruled out
- That leaves me with Ontario, Alberta, BC, NS
- Also crime rates in these areas.

Again another thing is cost of housing,
- I can afford from CAN $50K to CAN $100K to buy a decent condo/house
- Big cities such as Toronto, Vancuver, Calgary are far expensive.

Please send your comments.
I am sorry that I had to post here..this is more
active than Lifestyle forum.
Job wise Toronto will be your best bet, but it is very expensive.
mhhp is offline  
Old Dec 2nd 2004, 2:35 am
  #5  
the-smiths
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Which province to move to ??

According to this news, New Brunswick is crying out for people:

News: New Brunswick to increase immigration


Enterprise Saint John is launching an ambitious three-year strategy
to boost immigration this morning with a compelling case that
attracting newcomers is an economic necessity.

The strategy targets boosting the number of immigration applicants
to 160 in 2005, 215 in 2006 and 312 in 2007, a 30-per-cent increase
each year.

In 2003, greater Saint John attracted just 123 immigration
applicants.

The targets may seem modest, but in light of a new study, achieving
them will be a challenge.

"I think the targets are a pretty big reach," said Fred- ericton-
based consultant Gwen McKay. "And that's based on Saint John being
wholly committed to what the study outlines."

Her 135-page study, based on dozens of interviews with immigrants,
community groups, government officials and major employers,
concludes that the community's existing capacity to attract
immigrants and keep them here is "full of gaping holes."

The challenge in New Brunswick's largest city is similar to that
facing the province, Atlantic Canada and much of rural and small-
city Canada: to reverse a slow population decline or stagnation that
spells trouble in all but the largest Canadian cities.

About 100 community leaders are hearing about the study and the
immigration strategy at a breakfast this morning at the New
Brunswick Museum in Market Square.

The session is the latest update on a key priority of the growth
strategy that Enterprise Saint John, the local economic development
agency, launched last October to boost the population of Saint John
and the suburban towns of Rothesay, Quispamsis, Grand Bay-Westfield
and St. Martins.

Only by taking charge of managing immigration at the local level
as "an economic necessity" and getting government, local agencies
and the public working together will the community be able to
attract and keep enough newcomers to strengthen its economy, says
the study.

Although improvements in federal or provincial policy can help,
there's no need and no time to wait for those changes, said Ms.
McKay.

"If we sit back and wait for Ottawa and the government of New
Brunswick to do this for us, we'll be old and grey and alone," she
said.

"We need community leaders, people with influence politically and
economically, to be in the driver's seat.

"This really is the community's future."
"People are the key to the economic growth we're after," said Dale
Knox, the economic development agency's chairman.

"This is the launch but there's lots more to be done. It'll be
incumbent on the whole community to follow through."

The economic rationale behind the push for more immigrants is
persuasive, says the report. Immigration is not the only need, but
is a priority along with improved education and repatriation of New
Brunswickers who left.

"Within this decade, it is anticipated that the New Brunswick
workforce will be 40 per cent smaller than needed to fill provincial
skills shortages," says the report. "Existing businesses will need
to downsize, move operations to provinces or communities where
skills are readily available" or find newcomers with the right
skills.

Over and above the insufficient number of workers, New Brunswick's
workforce is under-educated for the changing economy.

Nearly one in five New Brunswickers over the age of 25 have less
than a Grade 9 education. In Saint John, about half of high school
graduates pursue post-secondary education, and only half of them
complete their studies.

The study does highlight Saint John's strengths, including its
success in attracting hundreds of international students each year
to the University of New Brunswick-Saint John and NBCC-Saint John,
and an Immigrant Support Team chaired by developer John Rocca.

There are also what Ms. McKay calls "pockets" of intense enthusiasm
about creating a Saint John that is not just growing, but becoming
more culturally diverse.

But the report is also an inventory of shortcomings in the city's
ability to support immigrants, who increasingly arrive needing at
least temporary financial support, language training, and
orientation to the community and culture.

That support is crucial because - unlike Toronto or Vancouver, where
many ethnic communities number in the hundreds of thousands of
people - Saint John is virtually starting from scratch.

Its ethnic or cultural groups are too small in number and too few to
provide the needed support for more than a few newcomers.

The few agencies active in immigrant settlement services are
woefully understaffed and limp along on inadequate budgets. Their
lack of resources limits them to language and cultural adaptation,
primarily for refugees who did not choose Saint John, but were
funnelled here by the federal government. They do not offer
employment services.

"Saint John does not have the critical mass of economic
opportunities nor settlement capacity to professionally support the
immigrants it currently attracts," says the study.

As a consequence, the city - and indeed New Brunswick -
are "swinging gateways" through which immigrants come, and then
leave.

"Saint John and New Brunswick (have a) reputation as a poor economic
choice for immigrants," says the study.

The study recommends Saint John focus on select immigration
opportunities by viewing potential immigrants - and those who would
employ them - as clients.

In stages, the community needs to survey employers about their
specific job opportunities, particularly the ones that will be hard
to fill locally, then seek out markets of potential immigrants who
are most likely to match those needs.

For example, if there's a shortage predicted in a certain trade, and
local training can't meet the need, then research could expose which
country has trades credentials or even a labour surplus that is most
like Canada's.

The study also outlines the tall order employers will have to fill
if they are to keep the immigrant workers they attract. For example,
it recommends employers adopt workplace diversity programs.

The report's findings are based on research into international
immigration trends, federal and provincial immigration policy and
best practices in Canadian cities that have successfully attracted
and helped settle more than their share of newcomers. Ms. McKay also
interviewed more than 100 business, government, educational and
community leaders in Saint John, as well as immigrants who stayed,
immigrants who left, and international students.

New Brunswick Facts & Figures
Population: 758,000
Capital City: Fredericton
Major Cities: St John - 91,000 pop
Moncton - 90,000
Fredericton - 54,000
Area: 73 437 km2
Major Industries: agriculture and fisheries, tourism,
manufacturing, forestry, mining
 
Old Dec 2nd 2004, 3:06 am
  #6  
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Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 127
ChicagoJer is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Which province to move to ??

Have you considered Winnipeg, MB? It's a relatively large city with a lower cost of living...

Originally Posted by the-smiths
According to this news, New Brunswick is crying out for people:

News: New Brunswick to increase immigration


Enterprise Saint John is launching an ambitious three-year strategy
to boost immigration this morning with a compelling case that
attracting newcomers is an economic necessity.

The strategy targets boosting the number of immigration applicants
to 160 in 2005, 215 in 2006 and 312 in 2007, a 30-per-cent increase
each year.

In 2003, greater Saint John attracted just 123 immigration
applicants.

The targets may seem modest, but in light of a new study, achieving
them will be a challenge.

"I think the targets are a pretty big reach," said Fred- ericton-
based consultant Gwen McKay. "And that's based on Saint John being
wholly committed to what the study outlines."

Her 135-page study, based on dozens of interviews with immigrants,
community groups, government officials and major employers,
concludes that the community's existing capacity to attract
immigrants and keep them here is "full of gaping holes."

The challenge in New Brunswick's largest city is similar to that
facing the province, Atlantic Canada and much of rural and small-
city Canada: to reverse a slow population decline or stagnation that
spells trouble in all but the largest Canadian cities.

About 100 community leaders are hearing about the study and the
immigration strategy at a breakfast this morning at the New
Brunswick Museum in Market Square.

The session is the latest update on a key priority of the growth
strategy that Enterprise Saint John, the local economic development
agency, launched last October to boost the population of Saint John
and the suburban towns of Rothesay, Quispamsis, Grand Bay-Westfield
and St. Martins.

Only by taking charge of managing immigration at the local level
as "an economic necessity" and getting government, local agencies
and the public working together will the community be able to
attract and keep enough newcomers to strengthen its economy, says
the study.

Although improvements in federal or provincial policy can help,
there's no need and no time to wait for those changes, said Ms.
McKay.

"If we sit back and wait for Ottawa and the government of New
Brunswick to do this for us, we'll be old and grey and alone," she
said.

"We need community leaders, people with influence politically and
economically, to be in the driver's seat.

"This really is the community's future."
"People are the key to the economic growth we're after," said Dale
Knox, the economic development agency's chairman.

"This is the launch but there's lots more to be done. It'll be
incumbent on the whole community to follow through."

The economic rationale behind the push for more immigrants is
persuasive, says the report. Immigration is not the only need, but
is a priority along with improved education and repatriation of New
Brunswickers who left.

"Within this decade, it is anticipated that the New Brunswick
workforce will be 40 per cent smaller than needed to fill provincial
skills shortages," says the report. "Existing businesses will need
to downsize, move operations to provinces or communities where
skills are readily available" or find newcomers with the right
skills.

Over and above the insufficient number of workers, New Brunswick's
workforce is under-educated for the changing economy.

Nearly one in five New Brunswickers over the age of 25 have less
than a Grade 9 education. In Saint John, about half of high school
graduates pursue post-secondary education, and only half of them
complete their studies.

The study does highlight Saint John's strengths, including its
success in attracting hundreds of international students each year
to the University of New Brunswick-Saint John and NBCC-Saint John,
and an Immigrant Support Team chaired by developer John Rocca.

There are also what Ms. McKay calls "pockets" of intense enthusiasm
about creating a Saint John that is not just growing, but becoming
more culturally diverse.

But the report is also an inventory of shortcomings in the city's
ability to support immigrants, who increasingly arrive needing at
least temporary financial support, language training, and
orientation to the community and culture.

That support is crucial because - unlike Toronto or Vancouver, where
many ethnic communities number in the hundreds of thousands of
people - Saint John is virtually starting from scratch.

Its ethnic or cultural groups are too small in number and too few to
provide the needed support for more than a few newcomers.

The few agencies active in immigrant settlement services are
woefully understaffed and limp along on inadequate budgets. Their
lack of resources limits them to language and cultural adaptation,
primarily for refugees who did not choose Saint John, but were
funnelled here by the federal government. They do not offer
employment services.

"Saint John does not have the critical mass of economic
opportunities nor settlement capacity to professionally support the
immigrants it currently attracts," says the study.

As a consequence, the city - and indeed New Brunswick -
are "swinging gateways" through which immigrants come, and then
leave.

"Saint John and New Brunswick (have a) reputation as a poor economic
choice for immigrants," says the study.

The study recommends Saint John focus on select immigration
opportunities by viewing potential immigrants - and those who would
employ them - as clients.

In stages, the community needs to survey employers about their
specific job opportunities, particularly the ones that will be hard
to fill locally, then seek out markets of potential immigrants who
are most likely to match those needs.

For example, if there's a shortage predicted in a certain trade, and
local training can't meet the need, then research could expose which
country has trades credentials or even a labour surplus that is most
like Canada's.

The study also outlines the tall order employers will have to fill
if they are to keep the immigrant workers they attract. For example,
it recommends employers adopt workplace diversity programs.

The report's findings are based on research into international
immigration trends, federal and provincial immigration policy and
best practices in Canadian cities that have successfully attracted
and helped settle more than their share of newcomers. Ms. McKay also
interviewed more than 100 business, government, educational and
community leaders in Saint John, as well as immigrants who stayed,
immigrants who left, and international students.

New Brunswick Facts & Figures
Population: 758,000
Capital City: Fredericton
Major Cities: St John - 91,000 pop
Moncton - 90,000
Fredericton - 54,000
Area: 73 437 km2
Major Industries: agriculture and fisheries, tourism,
manufacturing, forestry, mining
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Old Dec 2nd 2004, 3:15 am
  #7  
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Default Re: Which province to move to ??

Originally Posted by newbee
Hello friends,

I am thinking of moving to Canada..but not sure which province.
What each province has to offer in terms of job
(Computer professional) and money saving.

I am not going for jolly ride... I mean business
and I want to work.

Some of the concerns are:
- Temperature during mid winter, I am not going to provinces
in the mid to upper range. My experience with cold
is winter in New Hampshire USA.
- I do not have permission to live in QUEBEC : ruled out
- That leaves me with Ontario, Alberta, BC, NS
- Also crime rates in these areas.

Again another thing is cost of housing,
- I can afford from CAN $50K to CAN $100K to buy a decent condo/house
- Big cities such as Toronto, Vancuver, Calgary are far expensive.

Please send your comments.
I am sorry that I had to post here..this is more
active than Lifestyle forum.
Not a question others can answer for you I'm afraid. Typically this is met with a snigger and a tiredofansweringthequestion "Nunavut" in the lifestyle section. I like where I live, but have long ago given up recomending areas to others as it is such a personal choice, what I like, others hate. Only you can tell what you are really looking for.

I am not sure why you think Quebec is out of the question, once you have federal PR, you can settle wherever you want, no one will know or care.

I didnt understand your comments regarding temperature, do you want the snowy winter or not, if not then basically BC is your best bet.

$50 to 100k will struggle to buy you a decent ( ie not in need of attention / maintainence) house outright anywhere you want to live (ie near a reasonable size town with jobs available), although at the $100k end it will put a roof over your head in my bit of Ontario, it will not be a great place. Remember if you go the condo route there are additional maintanence fees etc every month that add up to several 100s.

The only way you are going to be happy where you settle is to visit a few places and check them out. I am very happy where I live, but it would not suit some others, and I wouldnt presume to tell anyone where to live.

It is unfortunate that really you should go where you can get a job, but until you are resident in an area it can be hard to get an employers attention. The problem with places like Toronto is its a magnet to newcomers, which is both a good and bad thing, lots of job turn over, but lots of newcomers chasing the jobs too.

Crime rate is a bit irrelevent, its pretty low wherever you go, but even in "good towns" there are probably localised areas best avoided. You cant really use crime rate to narrow down a province I'm afraid! The "area" of ontario is greater than france and spain combined, so you can see crime statistics are pretty meaningless on that scale.

My advice would be to check out a few places and make your own mind up, and remember if it turns out you dont like a place after all, there is nothing to stop you moving somewhere else later. Try not to get too hung up about it.

Of course, if you dont post it in the lifestyle area, you wont get any answers from those already living here, but as I said its been asked and answered so many times before, and there is no answer to this one

Good Luck

Iain
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Old Dec 3rd 2004, 12:27 am
  #8  
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Default Re: Which province to move to ??

Hi,

Cant answer your question - I have not moved there yet but might be able to help you find your answer yourself a little more so you can ask further questions that people can answer.

I used the web to find weather statistics and patterns - not on a province scale but first for major cities in each province - you would be amazed how much they change within one province. Having found a weather pattern that suited I then looked at my own life style - work life balance. I then used the web again to find out about leasure activities I enjoy around the cities with the climate I liked. This narrowed things a lot.

I then started to look for maps, facilities etc in places around the citeis - would hate to live in a city but will rely on a city to provide work. You like me are i the IT trade and most cities must require IT staff. Then it was on to the job boards on the web to ensure IT jobs were being advertised in the cities I had chosen - of course they were.

once I had a short list I found that one province had more possible locations than any other province and I had my answer for which province. Then it was a case of further research on each city and towns surrounding the cities to decide which city I would live near. I came to a short list of two that I really fancied. Then It was time for a two week vacation to visit them - bingo I had an answer.

As an IT person you should be aware the web is a wonderful research tool with lots of facts and fiction that need cross referencing to establish the truth. Then talk to people that live there in the lifestyle area to get thier views of how good facilities are and what they think - dont forget each person is biased either for or against and without knowing the person you would have no way of knowing if you would agree so the more people you talk to the better your understanding will be - but a visit in person will soon sort things out.
Originally Posted by newbee
Hello friends,

I am thinking of moving to Canada..but not sure which province.
What each province has to offer in terms of job
(Computer professional) and money saving.

I am not going for jolly ride... I mean business
and I want to work.

Some of the concerns are:
- Temperature during mid winter, I am not going to provinces
in the mid to upper range. My experience with cold
is winter in New Hampshire USA.
- I do not have permission to live in QUEBEC : ruled out
- That leaves me with Ontario, Alberta, BC, NS
- Also crime rates in these areas.

Again another thing is cost of housing,
- I can afford from CAN $50K to CAN $100K to buy a decent condo/house
- Big cities such as Toronto, Vancuver, Calgary are far expensive.

Please send your comments.
I am sorry that I had to post here..this is more
active than Lifestyle forum.
Airseir is offline  
Old Dec 3rd 2004, 1:38 am
  #9  
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Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 167
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Arrow Re: Which province to move to ??

Thank you friends.

Gist of the story is
- List your lifestype and preferences, such as Top absolute necessities
, Top avoiders, Top compromizables.
- Then see closest fit.
- Of course, compromize as and when necessary, re formulate.
- NO SINGLE FORMULA solves everyone's needs
-----------

The reason I asked this:
- When I moved to US few years ago I made a big mistake
movig to East Coast v/s West Coast

- First few years, I am there as long as I can make a good
living optimized to good money saving,
Keep and develop skills necessary to build my current and future
life.

- Such love for other things in life like good Mountain view,
overall living, values etc, in my opinion
HAVE driven me, rather forced me backwards in the ruthless
Capatalistic world

- I have leant hard lessons that for now money is everything..
that is tied to getting a job, since I am not in a position to
start business now.


YOUR VIEWS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.
newbee is offline  

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