PR or Work Permit?

Old Nov 29th 2004, 9:29 pm
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Default PR or Work Permit?

I have been considering making the plunge and moving into Canada for a while now, but I'm still undecided as to which process I should take - As far as I can see, I have two options: Applying for permenant residency as a skilled worked, or getting a temporary work permit, and then applying for PR after living there for 1 year.

I plan on securing employment before the move, but I hear that PR applications can take up to 15 months? How long does a work permit take, and how do people who have been offered jobs in Canada done it before? Obviously the employer won't want to wait too long!

Also, has anyone managed to get a positive assessment from the HRDC concerning jobs in the internet/website industry?
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 9:41 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

It's up to you which route you want to go down really, and how long you are willing to wait, but there are so cases where you job does not need HRDC validation, but note that when you come in through a company, you are tied down to that company only, and should you lose your job, you will have to pack your bags.

Here is something for you:

Work Permits Requiring HRSDC Confirmation


Companies wishing to hire a foreign worker should contact their local HRSDC office to have the job offer "confirmed". If HRSDC determines that the recruitment of a foreign worker will have a neutral or positive impact on employment opportunities for Canadians, the confirmation may be approved. HRSDC approval is electronically transmitted to Immigration officials abroad (or in certain circumstances to a Canadian port-of-entry), and a confirmation approval notice is issued to the employer. Upon receipt of this notice, the prospective employee should be given a copy and instructed to contact the appropriate Canadian Visa office to apply for a work permit. The validity of the work permit is tied to the validity of the confirmation approval and may be renewed for a further period from within Canada. Processing fees are required for work permits.



Work Permit Required, But NO Confirmation


There are jobs, particularly in senior management categories, where labour market considerations do not apply. The following categories require a work permit, but grant exemption from the need to obtain a job confirmation:
Intra-company Transferees including senior executives, managers, or employees with specialized knowledge. The employee must have been employed with a related company for at least one year and have a letter from the company explaining that the employee is being transferred temporarily to a permanent establishment of that company in Canada.


Companies seeking to recruit computer software professionals can benefit from the Information Technology Worker Program. This collaborative project between Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Industry Canada and the Software Human Resources Council of Canada was set up to assist the Canadian software industry to meet industry needs for skilled workers. The program allows for the recruitment of qualified foreign software workers in seven software development areas without obtaining a specific confirmation from HRSDC. Applicants must apply at a visa office abroad (US citizens and permanent residents may apply at a port of entry) and present a job offer letter detailing the specific duties of the position being offered, and have evidence of their education, training and work experience establishing their ability to meet the requirements of one of the seven job descriptions.


Spouses of highly skilled work permit holders may apply for their own work permit without the need for a confirmation. In order to qualify, the applicant's spouse must have been approved for a work permit valid for six months or more in a management or high skill occupation as defined in the National Occupation Classification. The applicant does not need to have a written offer of employment from a Canadian employer in order to apply. Applications from spouses already admitted to Canada may be made by mail to the Case Processing Centre in Vegreville, Alberta. A spouse includes common-law or married partner.


Canadian companies may be able to transfer foreign workers when it can be demonstrated that specific reciprocal employment opportunities exist for Canadians because of the recruitment of these individuals. For example, a Canadian company that maintains an exchange program whereby Canadian employees are relocated abroad to a subsidiary company may benefit from this provision to transfer international staff to its Canadian operations.


Persons starting a business that will create a significant economic benefit through employment for Canadian residents or other economic activity may qualify for a self-employed work permit. Persons applying under this provision are strongly advised to research their business idea thoroughly and to prepare a comprehensive business plan.







Originally Posted by Neil.G
I have been considering making the plunge and moving into Canada for a while now, but I'm still undecided as to which process I should take - As far as I can see, I have two options: Applying for permenant residency as a skilled worked, or getting a temporary work permit, and then applying for PR after living there for 1 year.

I plan on securing employment before the move, but I hear that PR applications can take up to 15 months? How long does a work permit take, and how do people who have been offered jobs in Canada done it before? Obviously the employer won't want to wait too long!

Also, has anyone managed to get a positive assessment from the HRDC concerning jobs in the internet/website industry?
 
Old Nov 29th 2004, 9:53 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Originally Posted by the-smiths
Companies seeking to recruit computer software professionals can benefit from the Information Technology Worker Program. This collaborative project between Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Industry Canada and the Software Human Resources Council of Canada was set up to assist the Canadian software industry to meet industry needs for skilled workers. The program allows for the recruitment of qualified foreign software workers in seven software development areas without obtaining a specific confirmation from HRSDC. Applicants must apply at a visa office abroad (US citizens and permanent residents may apply at a port of entry) and present a job offer letter detailing the specific duties of the position being offered, and have evidence of their education, training and work experience establishing their ability to meet the requirements of one of the seven job descriptions.
This one is fairly interesting, as my choice of career may fall under this category - do you know where there might be a list of these seven areas are?
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:03 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Originally Posted by Neil.G
I have been considering making the plunge and moving into Canada for a while now, but I'm still undecided as to which process I should take - As far as I can see, I have two options: Applying for permenant residency as a skilled worked, or getting a temporary work permit, and then applying for PR after living there for 1 year.

I plan on securing employment before the move, but I hear that PR applications can take up to 15 months? How long does a work permit take, and how do people who have been offered jobs in Canada done it before? Obviously the employer won't want to wait too long!

Also, has anyone managed to get a positive assessment from the HRDC concerning jobs in the internet/website industry?
1. Hard as it is to find employment as a new PR in Canada, it's a lot harder to get an employer to sponsor for a work permit.

2. Why do you think work permit holders need to wait a year before applying for PR?

3. Even with a work permit, you must still qualify through the normal points system and have to send your application to a CIC office outside Canada (if you have a work permit you can normally apply to either the CIC office in Buffalo or your home country).

4. As someone else has noted, not having PR means that your situation in Canada is tenuous - be aware of the risks and issues.

5. It's often more in your interest to focus on the *best* way of achieving something as opposed to the *quickest* way.

Jeremy
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:08 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Originally Posted by JAJ
1. Hard as it is to find employment as a new PR in Canada, it's a lot harder to get an employer to sponsor for a work permit.

2. Why do you think work permit holders need to wait a year before applying for PR?

3. Even with a work permit, you must still qualify through the normal points system and have to send your application to a CIC office outside Canada (if you have a work permit you can normally apply to either the CIC office in Buffalo or your home country).

4. As someone else has noted, not having PR means that your situation in Canada is tenuous - be aware of the risks and issues.

5. It's often more in your interest to focus on the *best* way of achieving something as opposed to the *quickest* way.

Jeremy
Thanks for your advice - I see that simply obtaining a work permit is risky business, and of course with the loss of a job means the loss of the right to live in Canada.

If you belive that I stand a far greater chance of obtaining (and retaining) residency by going through the PR route, then I will definately take it into consideration when evaluating my options.

As far as I know, the work permit runs out after 1 year - that's where I got the number from.
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:12 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Originally Posted by Neil.G
As far as I know, the work permit runs out after 1 year - that's where I got the number from.
Work permits can be renewed.
And a work permit won't automatically be 'extended' simply because you have a PR application pending.


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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:30 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Originally Posted by JAJ
Work permits can be renewed.
And a work permit won't automatically be 'extended' simply because you have a PR application pending.


Jeremy
I didn't know you could renew the work permit, good to know. I didn't expect the PR application to affect the work permit in any way. I guess it wouldn't be after 1 year then would it - I'd have to start the application immediately anyway, regardless of how I got into Canada.

I think i'll take the slower, more effective route anyway. Thanks for your advice.
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:42 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Here you are, hope your job falls into one of these:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/work/itw-jobs.html



http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/work/itw.html




Originally Posted by Neil.G
This one is fairly interesting, as my choice of career may fall under this category - do you know where there might be a list of these seven areas are?
 
Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:54 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Sadly, it doesn't look as if Website Designers apply under that rule!
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Old Nov 29th 2004, 10:57 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

I've just been sponsored for a work visa by a Canadian company.

The process took around six weeks from couriering the forms back to my new company to getting the validation. I'll actually get the visa in my passport in January when I land.

As to the length of time on a work visa, I think it depends on the office, but as JAJ says you can always extend it. A friend of mine is now into his eighth year on a temporary work visa.

With regards to losing your job. This is about as likely as it would be for your occupation in the UK. Remember that the company which employs you on a work visa has put considerable effort into securing the visa for you.

As regards the PR application, having worked in Canada for over a year on a HRDC validated work permit means that you gain an additional 15 points on the PR application - 10 for arranged employment and 5 for adaptability....

Personally I'm happier going and taking the chance that I might lose my job and have to come home, than I am spending the next couple of years waiting for my PR application to come through. After all, there's no guarentee that you will get PR anyway, so you could have spent all that time waiting for nothing.
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Old Nov 30th 2004, 5:34 am
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

we moved here in Summer 2002 on work permits which are valid until spring 2005, when my husband's passport expires. we applied for PR in spring 2003 and are still waiting to hear back from Buffalo. I was pregnant when medicals were requested so there has been a delay but it is still rather annoying that we have it hanging over our heads. having said that, if you are really keen to come over and try it out, it is great.

My husband gets a bit frustrated from time-to-time that he can't switch jobs but he has a good job so we're in a pretty good situation. as long as we don't get rejected as I couldn't be bothered to go through the whole process again.
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Old Dec 3rd 2004, 11:18 am
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

Looking at the threads above, it looks like if you qualify for one of the 7 positions, you do not need HRSDC confirmation.

Can one apply for the work permit by filling out the forms ourselves, if we belong to the 7 categories and have a positive job offer from a company? Do I need to hire someone to file this application? Do I need a specific cover letter?

Any input is highly appreciated.

-Aspirant




Originally Posted by Sarah Farrand
I've just been sponsored for a work visa by a Canadian company.

The process took around six weeks from couriering the forms back to my new company to getting the validation. I'll actually get the visa in my passport in January when I land.

As to the length of time on a work visa, I think it depends on the office, but as JAJ says you can always extend it. A friend of mine is now into his eighth year on a temporary work visa.

With regards to losing your job. This is about as likely as it would be for your occupation in the UK. Remember that the company which employs you on a work visa has put considerable effort into securing the visa for you.

As regards the PR application, having worked in Canada for over a year on a HRDC validated work permit means that you gain an additional 15 points on the PR application - 10 for arranged employment and 5 for adaptability....

Personally I'm happier going and taking the chance that I might lose my job and have to come home, than I am spending the next couple of years waiting for my PR application to come through. After all, there's no guarentee that you will get PR anyway, so you could have spent all that time waiting for nothing.
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Old Dec 3rd 2004, 11:50 am
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

This should help answer you question in a way:

Work Permit Required, But NO Confirmation by HRDC


There are jobs, particularly in senior management categories, where labour market considerations do not apply. The following categories require a work permit, but grant exemption from the need to obtain a job confirmation:
Intra-company Transferees including senior executives, managers, or employees with specialized knowledge. The employee must have been employed with a related company for at least one year and have a letter from the company explaining that the employee is being transferred temporarily to a permanent establishment of that company in Canada.


Companies seeking to recruit computer software professionals can benefit from the Information Technology Worker Program. This collaborative project between Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Industry Canada and the Software Human Resources Council of Canada was set up to assist the Canadian software industry to meet industry needs for skilled workers. The program allows for the recruitment of qualified foreign software workers in seven software development areas without obtaining a specific confirmation from HRSDC. Applicants must apply at a visa office abroad (US citizens and permanent residents may apply at a port of entry) and present a job offer letter detailing the specific duties of the position being offered, and have evidence of their education, training and work experience establishing their ability to meet the requirements of one of the seven job descriptions.


Spouses of highly skilled work permit holders may apply for their own work permit without the need for a confirmation. In order to qualify, the applicant's spouse must have been approved for a work permit valid for six months or more in a management or high skill occupation as defined in the National Occupation Classification. The applicant does not need to have a written offer of employment from a Canadian employer in order to apply. Applications from spouses already admitted to Canada may be made by mail to the Case Processing Centre in Vegreville, Alberta. A spouse includes common-law or married partner.


Canadian companies may be able to transfer foreign workers when it can be demonstrated that specific reciprocal employment opportunities exist for Canadians because of the recruitment of these individuals. For example, a Canadian company that maintains an exchange program whereby Canadian employees are relocated abroad to a subsidiary company may benefit from this provision to transfer international staff to its Canadian operations.


Persons starting a business that will create a significant economic benefit through employment for Canadian residents or other economic activity may qualify for a self-employed work permit. Persons applying under this provision are strongly advised to research their business idea thoroughly and to prepare a comprehensive business plan.




Originally Posted by Aspirant2000

Can one apply for the work permit by filling out the forms ourselves, if we belong to the 7 categories and have a positive job offer from a company? Do I need to hire someone to file this application? Do I need a specific cover letter?

Any input is highly appreciated.

-Aspirant
 
Old Dec 3rd 2004, 12:29 pm
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Default Re: PR or Work Permit?

HI The-Smiths,

Thanks for the reply. I saw this answer from a reply earlier in the same thread.

I would like if one can apply alone for a work-permit without the assistance of a lawyer or anyone, provided one has an offer letter from an employer and belong to the 7 categories.

Does one need a fancy cover letter and documents that a HR firm uses? Are there any template cover letters that can be used?

-Aspirant

Originally Posted by the-smiths
This should help answer you question in a way:

Work Permit Required, But NO Confirmation by HRDC


There are jobs, particularly in senior management categories, where labour market considerations do not apply. The following categories require a work permit, but grant exemption from the need to obtain a job confirmation:
Intra-company Transferees including senior executives, managers, or employees with specialized knowledge. The employee must have been employed with a related company for at least one year and have a letter from the company explaining that the employee is being transferred temporarily to a permanent establishment of that company in Canada.


Companies seeking to recruit computer software professionals can benefit from the Information Technology Worker Program. This collaborative project between Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Industry Canada and the Software Human Resources Council of Canada was set up to assist the Canadian software industry to meet industry needs for skilled workers. The program allows for the recruitment of qualified foreign software workers in seven software development areas without obtaining a specific confirmation from HRSDC. Applicants must apply at a visa office abroad (US citizens and permanent residents may apply at a port of entry) and present a job offer letter detailing the specific duties of the position being offered, and have evidence of their education, training and work experience establishing their ability to meet the requirements of one of the seven job descriptions.


Spouses of highly skilled work permit holders may apply for their own work permit without the need for a confirmation. In order to qualify, the applicant's spouse must have been approved for a work permit valid for six months or more in a management or high skill occupation as defined in the National Occupation Classification. The applicant does not need to have a written offer of employment from a Canadian employer in order to apply. Applications from spouses already admitted to Canada may be made by mail to the Case Processing Centre in Vegreville, Alberta. A spouse includes common-law or married partner.


Canadian companies may be able to transfer foreign workers when it can be demonstrated that specific reciprocal employment opportunities exist for Canadians because of the recruitment of these individuals. For example, a Canadian company that maintains an exchange program whereby Canadian employees are relocated abroad to a subsidiary company may benefit from this provision to transfer international staff to its Canadian operations.


Persons starting a business that will create a significant economic benefit through employment for Canadian residents or other economic activity may qualify for a self-employed work permit. Persons applying under this provision are strongly advised to research their business idea thoroughly and to prepare a comprehensive business plan.
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