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Is it possible to keep the job? Experts plz.

Is it possible to keep the job? Experts plz.

Old Jan 16th 2002, 11:08 pm
  #1  
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Hi
1. I'am going to immigrate from the Middle East. I have a good job and a possibility to work over the internet. Is it possible to live in Canada and work over the internet for my previous employer? I've read from this forum that immigrants from US have to quit there jobs before immigrating. Is it the same for me?

2. I'am going to land for a short time and go back (for less than 183 days) to finish all the arrangements. Would it be the problem when I land for the second time if I still keep the job? Should I quit the job? I don't want even slightly to jeopardize my second landing.

Thanks.
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Old Jan 17th 2002, 1:07 am
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Leon, let me tell something about Canadian immigration law.

When you are granted landing status, you have to observe residency obligation. According to the new law, it is 730 days of residency obligation within every five years after you become a Canadian permanent resident. This can be physical presence in Canada, or holding a full time overseas job assigned by a Canadian institution, or accompanying a Canadian citizen who staying overseas, or a spouse of the former mentioned Canadian permanent resident assigend to an overseas job.

Crossing fingers and wish you have a good luck.

Jonathan Fon
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Old Jan 17th 2002, 7:59 am
  #3  
Greg_del_pilar
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Hi!

I think Leon will observe residency rules, but is planning to telecommute. There is
no conflict here at all, right?

Leon, I think what you have to do once you get here is setup a company and work as an
independent contractor for your (overseas) "client". You will have to declare and pay
all appropriate taxes and obligations in order to maintain good standing of your
company. Whatever they're paying you should be made payable to your company instead.
Your company then pays you a salary (and the corresponding taxes to the goverment).

Good luck!

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Old Jan 20th 2002, 7:41 pm
  #4  
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Thank you guys for the answers.
Jonathan, I'am not sure that the new regulations are already applied.
Greg, I've made the following conclusions according to your answer, please confirm it for me:
1. There is no way to keep my current employment status in the country of origin (hired worker)
2. If so, I should quit the job (in this case I don't have any problem on my second landing beacause I can confirm the job resignation)
3. (sorry this one is a little bit heavy) Do you have any estimation how much my employer should pay me to make a salary, let's say, of 40k (before taxes) of canadian hired worker? Taking into account:
all the expenses for setting up the company;
I beleive the taxes on working overseas are higher;
a payment to an internet provider;
approximate phone payment;
anything else I don't know;

Thanks and best regards
Leon
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Old Jan 20th 2002, 8:53 pm
  #5  
Greg_del_pilar
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Leon:

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The question of how you get taxed (in your original country, or in Canada) makes this
too complicated for me. Thus, I don't know the correct answer to this question.
However, being a Canadian PR, I think it is to your best interest (and one that would
make things a lot simpler FOR YOU), if you just opt to become your own employer here
and have your present employer send you your "salary" by wire transfer (monthly or
bi-weekly). I'm thinking that it may even be possible for you (i.e., your own
Canadian company) to setup a business bank account in your country of origin, so that
your "client" will not have problems paying you (this may not be necessary if you're
presently in the US, because, then, they can just send you the check by mail).
HOWEVER, I am not an expert on these, and I will strongly encourage you to talk to a
CANADIAN accountant..

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Yes. You might also want to ask for agreement with them which says that they will
continue to conduct business with your company once you've completely set it up.

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Being your own employer here, I think you will be free to set whatever amount you
want for your own salary (subject, of course, to how much your company's income is).
If you want $4000 per month, that's fine. If you want $2000 per month, that's also
fine. The important thing to remember is that your taxes will increase with the
amount of your gross pay, and your company will have more "reserve" funds if you keep
your payroll down. My suggestion would be to live here for two to three months to
have a "feel" for what would be a reasonable income for you and your family. This
will also give you an idea of how much your company will need to spend on such things
as internet access, bank fees, employee benefits, etc.

Again, I am not an expert. I would advise you to talk to an accountant here if you do
decide to setup a company.

Good luck.

Greg
 

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