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Ottawa's tough new immigration rules will keep out essential workers

Ottawa's tough new immigration rules will keep out essential workers

Old Feb 12th 2002, 3:45 am
  #1  
Mark
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
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Ottawa's tough new immigration rules will keep out essential workers
http://www.nationalpost.com/search/s...208/1374059.ht
ml&qs=Ottawa's%20tough

Ben Trister National Post Canada is in a global competition for skilled immigrants,
yet our immigration system is in a state of disrepair. Processing times have
skyrocketed in the past three years. As an example, look at China, the primary source
for skilled immigrants to Canada. The Canadian Embassy in Beijing takes up to eight
years to interview applicants. Now, in addition to processing delays that threaten
the viability of our immigration program, the Canadian government hopes to bring in
strict new application standards and procedures. For the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce, these proposals are counter-productive to Canada's economic interests.

Part of what defines Canada is that we are, in large part, a nation of immigrants. We
have welcomed people who were motivated to build a better life by contributing to
Canadian society. Some came to work in the skilled trades, while others entered the
labour market in management and professional positions. Immigrants' contributions
have been varied, but on the whole undeniably positive.

If adopted, the proposed selection criteria now before Parliament would dramatically
change the face of immigration in this country and not for the better. Even
applicants who have master's degrees, are fluent in English or French, and score the
maximum for age and experience, would not qualify to immigrate unless they also had
an educated spouse and/or prior connections to Canada. The proposed selection
criteria would severely damage our ability to select immigrants who could serve the
broad needs of our economy.

Who do we need? The Automotive Parts Manufacturing Association forecasts a shortfall
of 15,000 workers in the five trades of machinist, tool and die-maker, mould-maker,
millwright and industrial electrician by the year 2007. The Canadian Tooling &
Machining Association estimates a shortfall of 7,000 workers in the three trades of
machinist, tool- & die-maker and mould-maker in the next five years. The Canadian
Medical Association identifies a current shortfall of 500 physicians each year. The
Association of Colleges and Universities says that universities in Canada will need
to hire about 30,000 faculty members over the next 10 years but the country is
producing about 4,000 PhD's a year. The Canadian Federation of Nurses expects that by
2011, Canada will be lacking well over 100,000 nurses. Canada has significant labour
shortages in construction, manufacturing, transportation, communications and
agriculture. All of these will be hard hit if the government's new approach to
immigration is implemented.

The new selection criteria proposals would also make it difficult for Canada to
attract foreign students, since it would be extremely difficult for them to immigrate
here. Similarly, it would be hard for recent graduates anywhere, including the United
States and Britain, to come to Canada, although their work experience is often highly
relevant to the Canadian environment. Even skilled workers with many years of
experience would find it difficult to qualify.

To make matters worse, not only does the federal government want to bring in
selection criteria that are entirely out of step with Canada's historic approach to
economic immigration, but it seeks to impose these selection criteria
retroactively. Thus, well over 100,000 people could have their applications
rejected, even though they were told that once they filed their applications any
subsequent changes to the selection criteria would not negatively affect their
applications. Furthermore, the government is seeking the power to use retroactivity
to fail applications on an ongoing basis. With this power, it would be impossible
for applicants to know what criteria would be used in their applications. Why would
anyone choose to participate in an immigration system in which the rules cannot be
known, when other countries offer predictability? How can a Canadian employer
attract a skilled worker to Canada without being able to offer some assurance the
worker will be able to immigrate to Canada?

How important is it for Canada to be able to attract skilled workers with a variety
of skill levels? Consider that in 10 years, 100% of the growth in Canada's labour
market will have to come through immigration, owing to Canada's ageing population and
declining birth rate. Without labour market growth, economic growth is that much
harder to achieve.

Thus, Canada must develop a strategy to meet our labour market needs through the
immigration program. It is shocking that we do not already have such a strategy in
place. This has much to do with the fact that Citizenship and Immigration Canada, and
its partner agency in immigration, Human Resources Development Canada, have not
historically had business needs in mind when constructing their systems.

Before the government significantly changes the selection criteria, it needs to
better understand the requirements of Canadian employers. This will enable the
government to develop a coherent strategy to introduce immigrants with the required
skills into our work force. The new Minister of Citizenship and Immigration should
work with Canada's business community to produce an immigration policy that will
contribute to Canada's future economic prosperity.

Ben Trister is chairman, immigration policy task force, for the Canadian Chamber
of Commerce.
 
Old Feb 16th 2002, 12:45 am
  #2  
Syed Wali
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default New Immigration Law

Dear Sir , I am the new member of this site . I have submited my application for
immigration to Canada, it already 3 months gone but I did't receive any response from
Singapore as my resigon is Singapore. I am an accountant working in a private firm in
Dhaka/ Bangladesh. Recently some immigration lowyer told me that there is very little
change to an accountant to become an immigrant in Canada. What do you think? Is the
new immigration law effict me? please give me your expart oppenion.

Thanks

Syed Meshko Wali e-mail : [email protected]





"Mark" <can_im2001*removeme*@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > Ottawa's tough new immigration rules will keep out essential workers
    > http://www.nationalpost.com/search/s...208/1374059.ht
    > ml&qs=Ottawa's%20tough
    >
    >
    > Ben Trister National Post Canada is in a global competition for skilled immigrants,
    > yet our immigration system is in a state of disrepair. Processing times have
    > skyrocketed in the past three years. As an example, look at China, the primary
    > source for skilled immigrants to Canada. The Canadian Embassy in Beijing takes up
    > to eight years to interview applicants. Now, in addition to processing delays that
    > threaten the viability of our immigration program, the Canadian government hopes to
    > bring in strict new application standards and procedures. For the Canadian Chamber
    > of Commerce, these proposals are counter-productive to Canada's economic interests.
    >
    > Part of what defines Canada is that we are, in large part, a nation of immigrants.
    > We have welcomed people who were motivated to build a better life by contributing
    > to Canadian society. Some came to work in the skilled trades, while others entered
    > the labour market in management and professional positions. Immigrants'
    > contributions have been varied, but on the whole undeniably positive.
    >
    > If adopted, the proposed selection criteria now before Parliament would
    > dramatically change the face of immigration in this country and not for the better.
    > Even applicants who have master's degrees, are fluent in English or French, and
    > score the maximum for age and experience, would not qualify to immigrate unless
    > they also had an educated spouse and/or prior connections to Canada. The proposed
    > selection criteria would severely damage our ability to select immigrants who could
    > serve the broad needs of our economy.
    >
    > Who do we need? The Automotive Parts Manufacturing Association forecasts a
    > shortfall of 15,000 workers in the five trades of machinist, tool and die-maker,
    > mould-maker, millwright and industrial electrician by the year 2007. The Canadian
    > Tooling & Machining Association estimates a shortfall of 7,000 workers in the three
    > trades of machinist, tool- & die-maker and mould-maker in the next five years. The
    > Canadian Medical Association identifies a current shortfall of 500 physicians each
    > year. The Association of Colleges and Universities says that universities in Canada
    > will need to hire about 30,000 faculty members over the next 10 years but the
    > country is producing about 4,000 PhD's a year. The Canadian Federation of Nurses
    > expects that by 2011, Canada will be lacking well over 100,000 nurses. Canada has
    > significant labour shortages in construction, manufacturing, transportation,
    > communications and agriculture. All of these will be hard hit if the government's
    > new approach to immigration is implemented.
    >
    > The new selection criteria proposals would also make it difficult for Canada to
    > attract foreign students, since it would be extremely difficult for them to
    > immigrate here. Similarly, it would be hard for recent graduates anywhere,
    > including the United States and Britain, to come to Canada, although their work
    > experience is often highly relevant to the Canadian environment. Even skilled
    > workers with many years of experience would find it difficult to qualify.
    >
    > To make matters worse, not only does the federal government want to bring in
    > selection criteria that are entirely out of step with Canada's historic approach to
    > economic immigration, but it seeks to impose these selection criteria
    > retroactively. Thus, well over 100,000 people could have their applications
    > rejected, even though they were told that once they filed their applications any
    > subsequent changes to the selection criteria would not negatively affect their
    > applications. Furthermore, the government is seeking the power to use retroactivity
    > to fail applications on an ongoing basis. With this power, it would be impossible
    > for applicants to know what criteria would be used in their applications. Why would
    > anyone choose to participate in an immigration system in which the rules cannot be
    > known, when other countries offer predictability? How can a Canadian employer
    > attract a skilled worker to Canada without being able to offer some assurance the
    > worker will be able to immigrate to Canada?
    >
    > How important is it for Canada to be able to attract skilled workers with a variety
    > of skill levels? Consider that in 10 years, 100% of the growth in Canada's labour
    > market will have to come through immigration, owing to Canada's ageing population
    > and declining birth rate. Without labour market growth, economic growth is that
    > much harder to achieve.
    >
    > Thus, Canada must develop a strategy to meet our labour market needs through the
    > immigration program. It is shocking that we do not already have such a strategy in
    > place. This has much to do with the fact that Citizenship and Immigration Canada,
    > and its partner agency in immigration, Human Resources Development Canada, have not
    > historically had business needs in mind when constructing their systems.
    >
    > Before the government significantly changes the selection criteria, it needs to
    > better understand the requirements of Canadian employers. This will enable the
    > government to develop a coherent strategy to introduce immigrants with the required
    > skills into our work force. The new Minister of Citizenship and Immigration should
    > work with Canada's business community to produce an immigration policy that will
    > contribute to Canada's future economic prosperity.
    >
    > Ben Trister is chairman, immigration policy task force, for the Canadian Chamber of
    > Commerce.
 

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