New Immigration Minister

Old Jan 18th 2002, 12:46 am
  #1  
Tanya Sokolova
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Hello, experts and visitors. I've been living in Canada more than 7 years. I have
been closely watching this group for a long time. . My sister is in the process and I
referred her to this group. But my question is of a more rhetorical character:
everybody is trying to see the benefits of the new minister or weaknesses of the
previous one. My question is: how can a person who used to be in the youth sports
become a Minister of immigration? If he is not an expert in this himself, then he
will do what the others suggest. Don't you find this situation a little strange? What
is the whole immigration policy about? Is it about the benefit for the country or
politicians' images? That reminds me of the post-revolutionary Russia and the words
of Lenin who said that "every maid can rull the country". Correct me if I am wrong.
The matter is not that I am against the new Minister. I am trying to understand the
general concept.
 
Old Jan 18th 2002, 2:17 am
  #2  
Mikhail Ivanov
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There is nothing strange. Do you remember russian word "nomenklatura" ? Practically
the same systems work in US and CA

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Old Jan 18th 2002, 3:02 am
  #3  
David R . Tucker
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Under the British parliamentary model, ministers in charge of departments are MPs and
hence generalists, not experts in a particular area. The typical career is to move
through a number of progressively more challenging posts, gaining experience and
ability for governing in general and in many different specific contexts, in
preparation for the ultimate generalist's job, Prime Minister. Compare, say, the
United States, where cabinet ministers (secretaries, they're called) are appointed by
the President and cannot, by law, be members of Congress. There is no ordinary way
for department heads in the US to become president. They generally are specialists
and, if they are dismissed, usually leave the administration. Not so under
parliamentary system. Parliamentary ministers not only stick around (for the most
part) if their party goes out of power, but critisise the new ministers of their
portfolios from the opposition benches.

Much of an MP's life is, indeed, about image. (Or had you noticed that?) You might
notice that ministers, being transient generalists, might not always have control
over what really happens in their departments, long-term. That's the premise for the
British comedy series "Yes, Minister" and "Yes, Prime Minister", in which unelected
upper-level bureaucrats run the country their way, manipulating the cabinet like so
many marionettes whenever necessary.

But the truth is that every system of administering democratic government has its
imperfections. The US system leads to more strident "turf wars" and departments that
sometimes coordinate poorly with each other. And it's never inspired a show as funny
as "Yes, Minister"!

--
David R. Tucker [email protected]

"I may be wrong, but I'm not Clearly Erroneous."

- Judge Hillman
 
Old Jan 18th 2002, 3:12 am
  #4  
Tom
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The new rule is to against colored applicants. If you are white, don't worry. Visa
officer will let you pass even your score is below 80...
 
Old Jan 18th 2002, 3:28 am
  #5  
Andrew Miller
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This kind of stupid and racist comments are really not appropriate here. Where in the
old or new rules you found anything about the race of applicants?!!!!

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

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Old Jan 19th 2002, 2:25 am
  #6  
Berto Volpentesta
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While the rules may not say anything about race or colour, can we = suggest that the
effect of policy is discriminatory and even if by = accident is that still not wrong?
Don't know. Just asking.

If you look at it from the very begining the system has been made to = select only
certain types of people. Then in the 60s someone figured = out that this was not
right to have in writing. Since then they have = implemented laws and rules that were
to be non discriminatory.

But, let's examine. Where do we find the most number of visa posts and = visa
officers? Where do we find the longest delays. (granted, not the = systems
fault entirely)

Now with new rules, where would we find English speaking people. It = seems without a
full 16 on Enlglish, you are out. So all those who do = not have English as a
language or instruction or use are out. Wrong? = That is the effect though.

--=20 Good luck,

All opinions expressed are IMHO, not anyone else's

Berto Volpentesta, B.A. (Spec. Hons.), B.Ed. Member, OPIC Director, OPIC and
Education Committee Chairman

Sidhu & Volpentesta Inc. Serving people around the world since 1991

www.svcanada.com

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[usenetquote2]> > The new rule is to against colored applicants. If you are white, =[/usenetquote2]
don't
[usenetquote2]> > worry. Visa officer will let you pass even your score is below 80...[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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Old Jan 19th 2002, 7:11 am
  #7  
Goose
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Berto, in the old days, suspected witches were held under water - if they
drowned...oops, sorry, not a witch...if they survived...ah-ha! Witch! Burn at the
stake! Methinks you apply a similar thinking to the use of English as a major source
of points in an application. Australia allocates a similar number of points for
English and since both Canada and Australia are multicultural in their approach to
immigration, the accent on English is there not to make it difficult for others of
different ethnic backgrounds but to ensure that applicants will be able to adapt more
easily to life in Canada. I have no doubt that Canada has made the same studies as
Australia and found that unemployment and (often as a consequence) crime is more
prevalent amongst immigrants with a poor command of English than with those that have
a good command of English (nothing to do with race, colour, creed etc, but everything
to do with coping in an Anglicised society).

"Berto Volpentesta" <[email protected]>
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Old Jan 20th 2002, 10:02 am
  #8  
Berto Volpentesta
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Posts: n/a
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Let me see. A person either gets 16 or 8 or nothing. It seems to me = that only with
16 can anyone be successful.

For countries where English is not the first language or a language of = instruction
and use, this means the effective score is 80 of 84 possible = points. =20

Even in the days of trial by water they believed their system was fair.

--=20 Good luck,

All opinions expressed are IMHO, not anyone else's

Berto Volpentesta, B.A. (Spec. Hons.), B.Ed. Member, OPIC Director, OPIC and
Education Committee Chairman

Sidhu & Volpentesta Inc. Serving people around the world since 1991

www.svcanada.com

"Goose" <[email protected]>
[usenetquote2]> > While the rules may not say anything about race or colour, can we=20 suggest that[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > the effect of policy is discriminatory and even if by=20 accident is that still[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > not wrong? Don't know. Just asking.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >=20[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > If you look at it from the very begining the system has been made to =[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > select only certain types of people. Then in the 60s someone =[/usenetquote2]
figured=20
[usenetquote2]> > out that this was not right to have in writing. Since then they =[/usenetquote2]
have=20
[usenetquote2]> > implemented laws and rules that were to be non discriminatory.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >=20[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > But, let's examine. Where do we find the most number of visa posts =[/usenetquote2]
and=20
[usenetquote2]> > visa officers? Where do we find the longest delays. (granted, not =[/usenetquote2]
the=20
[usenetquote2]> > systems fault entirely)[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >=20[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Now with new rules, where would we find English speaking people. It =[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > seems without a full 16 on Enlglish, you are out. So all those who =[/usenetquote2]
do=20
[usenetquote2]> > not have English as a language or instruction or use are out. =[/usenetquote2]
Wrong? =20
[usenetquote2]> > That is the effect though.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >=20[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > --=20 Good luck,[/usenetquote2]
 

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