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Medical problem with previous disease

Medical problem with previous disease

Old Nov 20th 2001, 6:50 pm
  #1  
Globe
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I have applied for Canadian Immigration and my interview was waived. I'm now
required to have the medical tests, however I have a previous condition that might
be a problem:

I am 31 years years old. Over two years ago I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Disease -
Type 2A (a very low type with about a 95% chance of full recovery). I was treated
with two months of Chemotherapy (a total of 4 sessions) and two months of
radiotherapy. After that I was tested and given a clean bill of health. I have had
regular six monthly check-ups which included CTs and Galliums scans and have been
given a clean bill of health for the past two years. The problem is, officially, the
medical profession will only declare one to be cured of such a disease after 5 years
of remission.

Does anyone know what my chances are of being accepted? From what I understand, as
long as one is healthly at the time of the medical examination, they cannot refuse
you however, could it be that I would only be considered to be healthy after a five
year remission period?

Would it help for me to undergo extra tests by specialists prior to the medical
examination, that I may submit, to speed up the process, or does the board only
recognize tests that have been carried out by their request?

Thanks in advance!
 
Old Nov 21st 2001, 12:30 am
  #2  
Russell Ranshaw
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We are in a similar position, wanting to know what medical restrictions there are to
immigrating to Canada.

I have posted here a few times with medical questions but have not received the
needed answers.

For example, we plan to maintain our US medicare so we can continue certain medical
treatments in the US. We were told that we probably couldn't do this. This is
incorrect, we have since determined.

I believe that Canadian immigration is based on point system, so if you have enough
points in other areas, such as money, education, job qualifications, your medical
condition will not stop you.

I wonder if there isn't another site where we could get info on how the point
system works.

Good Luck,

Barb
 
Old Nov 21st 2001, 1:01 am
  #3  
Alex Shlega
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Hi,

> I believe that Canadian immigration is based on point system, so if you
have
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qualifications,
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I wonder if it is so.. Did you see their FAQ page?

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/coming/medicals-e.html

It is said there:

Q: Is there a medical requirement for immigrating to Canada?
R: Yes. You and your dependents, whether accompanying you or not, must undergo and
pass a medical examination. To pass the medical examination you or your dependents
must not have a condition that is a danger to public health or safety or would
cause excessive demand on health or social services in Canada

So if you fail to pass medical tests you can not immigrate. However I am not a
doctor to answer the original question..

Regards Alex http://www.airlineguides.com/immigration - Immigration Guide
 
Old Nov 21st 2001, 1:06 am
  #4  
Stuart
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Barb, the comment about US Medical cover in Canada was meant to refer to private
cover when you are considered "resident" elsewhere. Our US HMO refused to continue
coverage the day we were considered resident in Canada. Medicare is a rather
different animal, and like many US benefits is likely based on Citizenship rather
than residence.

Medical inadmissibility overrides all other considerations for Canadian immigration.
You could have all the points in the world, but a medical condition which is believed
may cause an excessive load on the Canadian medical system, or having a current and
contagious illness will cause an application to fail.

Even lawyers and consultants cannot predict the way a medical examination will go. It
is a very difficult area to respond to, because the individual circumstances of each
case are significant. The responses of your own doctors, the physician doing the
medical, and the screeners and Physicians at CIC making the decisions will all have
an impact on the result. For example, say two people had a serious ailment both
apparently cured ... One is refused, the other accepted. Why? Basically it came down
to the info provided by the doctors. One was comprehensive, one was too sketchy.
Often there are nuances to an illness that we don't know about ... like that bout of
pneumonia you had as a kid left what appears to be a TB scar on your lung ... even if
it isn't, immigration authorities all over are paranoid of TB.

It's therefore normal to get responses of generalities or inadequate resposnese to
both medical inadmissibility and criminal inadmissibility questions ... Even if we
tell you that the last person we know who had hodgkins lymphoma was unsuccessful
doesn't necessarily mean that you'll be unsuccessful.

Stuart
 
Old Nov 21st 2001, 3:53 am
  #5  
David Cohen
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says...
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Determination of medical admissibility is made by a Medical Officer in
consideration of all available information. It is not possible to absolutely
determine this in advance.

If your condition does not pose a threat of excessive demand of the Canadian
health-care system, and does not affect your employability in your field, then they
should not be grounds for inadmissibility. Additional information on this topic may
be found at Campbell, Cohen's web site at the following URL:

http://canadavisa.com/documents/medical.htm

It is not the case that being healthy at the time of the examination is sufficient
for admissibility. A prior condition which poses a threat of recurrence or
complication can be grounds for concern and/or inadmissibility. The relative recency
of your condition may be considered a problem. Support from a specialist in the field
(not necessarily a DMP), however, may help overcome this factor.
________
CAMPBELL, COHEN - attorneys at law tel:514.937.9445 / fax:514.937.2618
[email protected] http://canadavisa.com

Online Community: http://canadavisa.com/community
 
Old Nov 21st 2001, 4:58 am
  #6  
Russell Ranshaw
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<Medical inadmissibility overrides all other considerations for Canadian immigration.
You could have all the points in the world, but a medical condition which is believed
may cause an excessive load on the Canadian medical system, or having a current and
contagious illness will cause an application to fail.<

Here are the facts:

"M2 Has a condition for which the degree of risk to public health or safety is not
sufficient to exclude admission, but which risk should be considered in relation to
other personal and social criteria.

M3 Has a condition for which the potential demand on health or social services is not
sufficient to exclude admission, but which risk should be considered in relation to
other personal and social criteria."

This means that they take into consideration more than just the medical problem when
it is not an extreme one, doesn't it!

Barb
 
Old Nov 23rd 2001, 1:22 am
  #7  
Berto Volpentesta
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Up to M3 and possibly M4 the visa officer could still issue a visa = depending on
circumstances and various court decisions and memorandums.

However, the scale does go up to M7. So, naturally, if the condition is = such that
it will be a burden on health or social services or if there = is a danger to the
public. These will be inadmissible regardless of = points.

Don't know if this adds anything, I just caught the Re: part of the = thread.

--=20 Good luck,

Berto Volpentesta, B.A. (Spec. Hons.), B.Ed. Member, OPIC Director, OPIC and
Education Committee Chairman

Sidhu & Volpentesta Inc. Serving people around the world since 1991

www.svcanada.com

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