is it legal to volunteer?

Old Oct 20th 2002, 5:18 pm
  #1  
Immigrationwiz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default is it legal to volunteer?

Can I gain work experience by volunteering to work for a Canadian
Company/organization, without having a work permit?
 
Old Oct 20th 2002, 6:06 pm
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: is it legal to volunteer?

No.

Below is short explanation what is not considered *work*, thus doesn't require
work permit:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
What kind of activities do we not consider to be "work"?

- An activity which does not really 'take away' from opportunities for
Canadians or permanent residents to gain employment or experience in the
workplace is not "work" for the purposes of the definition.

Examples of activities not considered to be "work" include, but are not limited
to:

- Volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated, such as
sitting on the board of a charity or religious institution; being a 'big
brother', or 'big sister' to a child; being on the line at a rape crisis
centre. Normally this activity would be part time (and incidental to the main
reason that a person is in Canada).

- Unremunerated helping of a friend or family member during a visit, such as a
mother assisting a daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his nephew
build his own cottage

- Long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a visitor whose
employer is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada

- Self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact on the
labour market, nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians. Examples
include a U.S. farmer crossing the border to work on some fields that he owns,
or a miner coming to work on his own claim.

- There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is really
incidental to the main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is not a
competitive activity, even though non-monetary valuable consideration is
received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family farm and work
part time just for room and board for a short period (i.e., 1-4 weeks), we
would not consider this person to be a worker.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

More - if you need to gain work experience for the purpose of PR visa
application then it must be a paid employment and if it is in Canada it must be
on work permit.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)

For confidential phone consultation go here:

http://members.yahoo.-
liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

________________________________


"immigrationWiz" wrote in message
news:l6Ms9.1954$Zy4.280384@n-
ews20.bellglobal.com
...
    > Can I gain work experience by volunteering to work for a Canadian
    > Company/organization, without having a work permit?
 
Old Oct 21st 2002, 12:07 am
  #3  
Immigrationwiz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: is it legal to volunteer?

I already applied for PR.I want to get some experience in a Canadian
business environment.
I won't be paid, and what I intend to do is definitely short of internship
of any kind.I am already in Canada on a work permit,
the other thing would be secondary to the main purpose of my stay in
Canada.Moreover, it doesn't really take away anything from Canadians or PR
holders, since I am just looking to follow the business operation, and look
at technology being implemented in the real world.There is no real
opportunity for employment
or practicum/Internship there.
"Andrew Miller" wrote in message
news:yPMs9.31265$wU3.27537-
[email protected]
...
    > No.
    > Below is short explanation what is not considered *work*, thus doesn't
require
    > work permit:
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > What kind of activities do we not consider to be "work"?
    > - An activity which does not really 'take away' from opportunities for
    > Canadians or permanent residents to gain employment or experience in the
    > workplace is not "work" for the purposes of the definition.
    > Examples of activities not considered to be "work" include, but are not
limited
    > to:
    > - Volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated,
such as
    > sitting on the board of a charity or religious institution; being a 'big
    > brother', or 'big sister' to a child; being on the line at a rape crisis
    > centre. Normally this activity would be part time (and incidental to the
main
    > reason that a person is in Canada).
    > - Unremunerated helping of a friend or family member during a visit, such
as a
    > mother assisting a daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his nephew
    > build his own cottage
    > - Long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a visitor whose
    > employer is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada
    > - Self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact on
the
    > labour market, nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians. Examples
    > include a U.S. farmer crossing the border to work on some fields that he
owns,
    > or a miner coming to work on his own claim.
    > - There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is
really
    > incidental to the main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is not
a
    > competitive activity, even though non-monetary valuable consideration is
    > received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family farm and
work
    > part time just for room and board for a short period (i.e., 1-4 weeks), we
    > would not consider this person to be a worker.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
    > More - if you need to gain work experience for the purpose of PR visa
    > application then it must be a paid employment and if it is in Canada it
must be
    > on work permit.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > For confidential phone consultation go here:
    > http://members.yaho-
    > o.liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

    > ________________________________
    > "immigrationWiz" wrote in message
    > news:l6Ms9.1954$Zy4.280384-
    > @news20.bellglobal.com
    ...
    > > Can I gain work experience by volunteering to work for a Canadian
    > > Company/organization, without having a work permit?
    > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 21st 2002, 3:09 am
  #4  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: is it legal to volunteer?

It is your butt and your PR process you will be putting at risk...

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)

For confidential phone consultation go here:

http://members.yahoo.-
liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

________________________________


"immigrationWiz" wrote in message
news:v6Ss9.2581$U17.275397@n-
ews20.bellglobal.com
...
    > I already applied for PR.I want to get some experience in a Canadian
    > business environment.
    > I won't be paid, and what I intend to do is definitely short of internship
    > of any kind.I am already in Canada on a work permit,
    > the other thing would be secondary to the main purpose of my stay in
    > Canada.Moreover, it doesn't really take away anything from Canadians or PR
    > holders, since I am just looking to follow the business operation, and look
    > at technology being implemented in the real world.There is no real
    > opportunity for employment
    > or practicum/Internship there.
    > "Andrew Miller" wrote in message
    > news:yPMs9.31265$wU3.275-
    > [email protected]
    ...
    > > No.
    > >
    > > Below is short explanation what is not considered *work*, thus doesn't
    > require
    > > work permit:
    > >
    > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > What kind of activities do we not consider to be "work"?
    > >
    > > - An activity which does not really 'take away' from opportunities for
    > > Canadians or permanent residents to gain employment or experience in the
    > > workplace is not "work" for the purposes of the definition.
    > >
    > > Examples of activities not considered to be "work" include, but are not
    > limited
    > > to:
    > >
    > > - Volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated,
    > such as
    > > sitting on the board of a charity or religious institution; being a 'big
    > > brother', or 'big sister' to a child; being on the line at a rape crisis
    > > centre. Normally this activity would be part time (and incidental to the
    > main
    > > reason that a person is in Canada).
    > >
    > > - Unremunerated helping of a friend or family member during a visit, such
    > as a
    > > mother assisting a daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his nephew
    > > build his own cottage
    > >
    > > - Long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a visitor whose
    > > employer is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada
    > >
    > > - Self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact on
    > the
    > > labour market, nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians. Examples
    > > include a U.S. farmer crossing the border to work on some fields that he
    > owns,
    > > or a miner coming to work on his own claim.
    > >
    > > - There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is
    > really
    > > incidental to the main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is not
    > a
    > > competitive activity, even though non-monetary valuable consideration is
    > > received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family farm and
    > work
    > > part time just for room and board for a short period (i.e., 1-4 weeks), we
    > > would not consider this person to be a worker.
    > > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > -----
    > >
    > > More - if you need to gain work experience for the purpose of PR visa
    > > application then it must be a paid employment and if it is in Canada it
    > must be
    > > on work permit.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > >
    > > For confidential phone consultation go here:
    > >
    > > http://members.ya-
    > > hoo.liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "immigrationWiz" wrote in message
    > > news:l6Ms9.1954$Zy4.2803-
    > > [email protected]
    ...
    > > > Can I gain work experience by volunteering to work for a Canadian
    > > > Company/organization, without having a work permit?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 21st 2002, 4:58 am
  #5  
Immigrationwiz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: is it legal to volunteer?

Thank you for you reply Mr. Miller.
"Andrew Miller" wrote in message
news:rMUs9.30427$Sk6.27120-
[email protected]
...
    > It is your butt and your PR process you will be putting at risk...
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > For confidential phone consultation go here:
    > http://members.yaho-
    > o.liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

    > ________________________________
    > "immigrationWiz" wrote in message
    > news:v6Ss9.2581$U17.275397-
    > @news20.bellglobal.com
    ...
    > > I already applied for PR.I want to get some experience in a Canadian
    > > business environment.
    > > I won't be paid, and what I intend to do is definitely short of
internship
    > > of any kind.I am already in Canada on a work permit,
    > > the other thing would be secondary to the main purpose of my stay in
    > > Canada.Moreover, it doesn't really take away anything from Canadians or
PR
    > > holders, since I am just looking to follow the business operation, and
look
    > > at technology being implemented in the real world.There is no real
    > > opportunity for employment
    > > or practicum/Internship there.
    > > "Andrew Miller" wrote in message
    > > news:yPMs9.31265$wU3.2-
    > > [email protected]
    ...
    > > > No.
    > > >
    > > > Below is short explanation what is not considered *work*, thus doesn't
    > > require
    > > > work permit:
    > > >
    > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > > What kind of activities do we not consider to be "work"?
    > > >
    > > > - An activity which does not really 'take away' from opportunities for
    > > > Canadians or permanent residents to gain employment or experience in
the
    > > > workplace is not "work" for the purposes of the definition.
    > > >
    > > > Examples of activities not considered to be "work" include, but are
not
    > > limited
    > > > to:
    > > >
    > > > - Volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated,
    > > such as
    > > > sitting on the board of a charity or religious institution; being a
'big
    > > > brother', or 'big sister' to a child; being on the line at a rape
crisis
    > > > centre. Normally this activity would be part time (and incidental to
the
    > > main
    > > > reason that a person is in Canada).
    > > >
    > > > - Unremunerated helping of a friend or family member during a visit,
such
    > > as a
    > > > mother assisting a daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his
nephew
    > > > build his own cottage
    > > >
    > > > - Long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a visitor
whose
    > > > employer is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada
    > > >
    > > > - Self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact
on
    > > the
    > > > labour market, nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians.
Examples
    > > > include a U.S. farmer crossing the border to work on some fields that
he
    > > owns,
    > > > or a miner coming to work on his own claim.
    > > >
    > > > - There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is
    > > really
    > > > incidental to the main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is
not
    > > a
    > > > competitive activity, even though non-monetary valuable consideration
is
    > > > received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family farm
and
    > > work
    > > > part time just for room and board for a short period (i.e., 1-4
weeks), we
    > > > would not consider this person to be a worker.
    > >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > -----
    > > >
    > > > More - if you need to gain work experience for the purpose of PR visa
    > > > application then it must be a paid employment and if it is in Canada
it
    > > must be
    > > > on work permit.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > >
    > > > ../..
    > > >
    > > > Andrew Miller
    > > > Immigration Consultant
    > > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > > email: [email protected]
    > > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > >
    > > > For confidential phone consultation go here:
    > > >
    > > > http://members.-
    > > > yahoo.liveadvice.com/andrewmiller_canada

    > > > ________________________________
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "immigrationWiz" wrote in message
    > > > news:l6Ms9.1954$Zy4.28-
    > > > [email protected]
    ...
    > > > > Can I gain work experience by volunteering to work for a Canadian
    > > > > Company/organization, without having a work permit?
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 

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