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kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

Old Aug 15th 2008, 4:03 am
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Default kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

hi, not confirmed as yet but we think my husband may have a kidney stone,does anyone know how this is viewed as far as medicals are concerned?
i will be a canadian citizen as of next april and will be able to sponsor my husband and children,just wondering if anyone can help at all with this question,am a bit worried now that they wont let my husband in,thanks
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 4:17 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

See my comment (#7) in this thread: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showthread.php?t=555096
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 4:30 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

can hubby not have them lasered away before april?.....don't answere that if it's private but just wondering....
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 5:49 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

he probably could have them lasered but the fact that its on his medical records concerns me a bit,and just read the forum rich has sent,and even more concerned now!!! looks like immigation take a dim view at kidney problems!
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 7:34 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

What are the symptoms?
Many kidney stones don't move and are too small to cause any symptoms. However, if a kidney stone causes a blockage, or moves into the ureter, it may cause some of the following symptoms:

severe pain or aching in the back on one or both sides
sudden spasms of excruciating pain (renal or uteric colic) - this usually starts in the back below the ribs, before radiating around the abdomen, and sometimes to the groin and genitalia
bloody, cloudy or smelly urine
feeling or being sick
a frequent urge to urinate, or a burning sensation during urination
fever and chills
These can also be symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or cystitis, which is much more common than kidney stones in young women. If you have one or more of these symptoms you should seek medical advice.

Kidney stones are usually passed out of the body within 48 hours, but attacks can sometimes last for over 30 days.

What causes kidney stones?
In most people the underlying cause isn't known. Some people with kidney stones have lower levels of citrate in their urine, which usually stops the stones forming.

Different kinds of kidney stones form from different salts in the urine.

Calcium stones are the most common type of kidney stone. They are either spiky or large and smooth, and are made up of calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate.

Calcium stones are more common in people who have excess levels of vitamin D or who have an overactive parathyroid gland. People who have medical conditions such as cancer, some kidney diseases, or a disease called sarcoidosis are also more likely to develop calcium stones.

Uric acid stones are smooth, brown and soft. Excess amounts of uric acid can be caused by eating a lot of meat. Conditions such as gout and treatments such as chemotherapy can also increase the risk of getting uric acid stones.

Struvite stones (infection stones) are usually large and have a horn-like shape. They develop when there is too much ammonia in the urine. This can happen if you have a urinary tract infection (UTI), because the bacteria that cause these infections can generate ammonia. This kind of kidney stone is most often found in women.

Cystine stones are yellow and crystalline. They develop if you have high levels of cystine in your urine, which happens if you have a hereditary disorder called cystinuria. Only one in a hundred kidney stones are caused by this condition. Cystine stones tend to develop earlier in life than other kidney stones, usually between the ages of 10 and 30 years.

Who gets kidney stones?
Men are more prone than women, and around half of all people who have previously had a kidney stone will develop another one within five years.

Other risk factors include:

a family history of kidney stones
being aged between 20 and 40
taking certain medicines such as diuretics (water tablets), antacids and thyroid medications
having only one kidney, or an abnormally shaped kidney
eating a diet high in protein
being regularly dehydrated
having very poor mobility (eg, being confined to bed)
having a disease of the small intestine or a small intestinal bypass
How are kidney stones diagnosed?
Doctors can usually diagnose kidney stones by asking about your symptoms and examining you. Further tests may be done to confirm the diagnosis and to reveal the size, location and type of stone. These include:

blood tests - to identify excess amounts of certain chemicals related to the formation of stones
urine analysis - to look for signs of infection
taking an X-ray image - stones that contain calcium usually show up white on X-ray images
an intravenous urogram (IVU) - this involves an injection of a special dye that shows up the whole urinary system on X-ray images, revealing stones that can't usually be seen
ultrasound scan - this uses high frequency sound waves to produce an image of the internal organs
non-contrast helical computerised tomography - this produces pictures from a series of X-ray images taken at different angles - it is sometimes used to diagnose kidney stones, and is thought to be the most accurate diagnostic test
How are kidney stones treated?
Treatment depends on the type and cause of the stone. Most stones can be treated without surgery. Drinking lots of water (two and a half to three litres per day) and staying physically active are often enough to move stones smaller than about five millimetres out of your body. You may be prescribed paracetamol or codeine to reduce the pain.

Your doctor may ask you to catch the kidney stone by passing your urine through filter paper or a tea strainer. The stone can then be analysed to find out what type it is to help guide your treatment.

However, if there is an infection, a blockage, or a risk of kidney damage, you will receive treatment to remove your stone. Infections can be treated with antibiotics. Stones that are stuck can be removed in several ways:

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)
This is the most common method of dealing with kidney stones. The kidney stone is located using X-ray imaging or ultrasound scanning. While you are lying down, a machine called a lithotriptor sends targeted shock waves to break up the kidney stone into crystals small enough to be passed in your urine. Because it can be uncomfortable when the kidney stones break up, you will be given painkillers before the procedure is started.

Ureteroscopic stone removal
If a stone is lodged in the ureter, a narrow, flexible instrument called a cystoscope can be passed up through the urethra and bladder. The stone is captured and removed, or broken up with a laser beam or shock waves generated by a device attached at the end of the cytoscope. This procedure is usually done under a general anaesthetic.

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL)
Large stones can be surgically removed from the kidney. The surgeon makes a small cut in your back and uses a telescopic instrument called a nephroscope to pull the stone out or break it up with shock waves or a laser.

PCNL is performed under general anesthesia. This can temporarily affect your co-ordination and reasoning skills, so you should not drive, drink alcohol, operate machinery or sign legal documents for 48 hours afterwards. If you are in any doubt about driving, please contact your motor insurer so that you are aware of their recommendations, and always follow your doctor's advice.

Prevention
To help prevent any type of kidney stone you should drink more fluid. You should aim to drink at least three litres every 24 hours, or enough to make your urine clear rather than a yellow colour. Talk to your doctor for more advice on this.

It used to be thought that reducing the amount of calcium in your diet would lower the risk of developing calcium stones. However, research has shown that a diet containing normal or even increased amounts of calcium containing food (such as dairy products or green leafed vegetables) may be more helpful.

If you get calcium oxalate stones, cut down on foods that have high levels of oxalate - chocolate, tea, rhubarb, cooked spinach and asparagus.

If you get uric acid stones you should eat less meat, fish and poultry, and your doctor may prescribe medicine to help reduce the level of uric acid in your urine.

You should discuss dietary changes with your doctor as they are not appropriate for everyone.

If you get cystine stones, your doctor may prescribe medicines to reduce the chance of the stones forming.

If you develop struvite or "infection" stones your urine must be kept free of the bacteria that are causing the infection. This may mean taking long-term antibiotics.

Further information
National Kidney Federation (UK)
0845 6010209
www.kidney.org.uk
Kidney Research UK
0845 0707601
www.kidneyresearchuk.org


hope that all helps.....i know you are concerned but i think you should find out for yourself from your own doc about emmigration and hubbies medical records......get in contact with the nearest doc from the CHC recommended list of doc's and have a chat with-out personal details and.........email CHC too and ask the question.....cover all options......good luck
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 8:47 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

wow!! thanks gibsonslanding for all that info and your time. my husband had been having pain in his kidney to groin area for a couple of weeks,then got the bad episode for which he described as like childbirth! i must admit he looked awful,practically all the symptoms you described other than smelly urine,fever,chills,nausea,excrutiating pain then out popped a ragged looking brown stone with glistening parts on it almost looks like it has a few shiny diamonds in there,about 3 mm in size.due to see a consultant in couple of weeks,maybe there isnt anymore,hes thinking of throwing the stone away but i think he should show it to consultant,but he is figuring that it wont be on his records then!!!
we shall see,thanks so much for your time
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 9:16 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

you're very welcome.......just a word of advice though; hubbies health is very important, regardless of any plans to emmigrate. see the consultant and show him the 'stone'......if you've got as far as seeing a consultant, then it's on some record somewhere already and your consultant will advise of the next steps. it might be something to have a 'challenge' over (probably a change in diet) or probably not but best get checked out......more advice, get hubby to drink lots of water; flush him through......good luck.
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 9:29 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

meant to add......has hubby had any pain in his toes? or other joints? does he drink alot of red wine or eat alot of red meat? if yes to any of these, his condition could be gout! goggle it and consider.......he might have a build up of uric acid which could explain the passing of 'crystals'......your consultant is the expert and he will advise.....
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 9:32 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

Hi.
Hopefully all will be well with hubby and the immigration, but I do want to ofer a word of warning with regard to "prior/previous" conditions and insurance.
I just got here (Ontario) and prior to moving was well informend that OHIP would NOT be given to me for 3 months After arrival and that I should get my own private insurance to cover that period. This I did ( at about 200 pounds) and whilst in flight to TO, a wisdom tooth started to play up. I took pain killers repeatedly and each time they wore off i took more. The day after I got here I decided that i couldn't go on taking pain killers, and went to the dentist. He took the offender out and it cost about $314.
I tried to claim this back ( thinking that in all likelihood they would refuse.) I was right. They DID refuse ( and here comes the important part, so watch closely-) because i had "Taken painkillers" in the early morning, on the flight, the condition was therefore "pre existing" to my arrival on Canadian soil ! Now thats a pretty weasly way to get out of paying, BUT the lesson here is that althought $314 is $314, think of what would have happened if it had have involved hospitalization. Just a word of warning about insurance companies!
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Old Aug 15th 2008, 10:13 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

no pain in joints or toes,but definately doesnt drink enough,before the stone came out and the nausea eased i got him to drink 2 pints of water and all the symptoms eased,judging by what youve said i reckon its his diet(red meat!!and coffee) and dehydration,just been told to write that he is otherwise fit and healthy!! he says im making him look like a fatty,and better get good insurance before we land by the sound of it!!
thanks so much
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Old Aug 16th 2008, 4:28 am
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Default Re: kidney stones-does this create a huge problem?

Originally Posted by tristan2
hi, not confirmed as yet but we think my husband may have a kidney stone,does anyone know how this is viewed as far as medicals are concerned?
i will be a canadian citizen as of next april and will be able to sponsor my husband and children,just wondering if anyone can help at all with this question,am a bit worried now that they wont let my husband in,thanks
Hi hope you have no problems and that hubbys health is OK.
I am currently waiting for LMO and I have an appointment with a consultant next thursday. Mine are gall stones. I am hoping they will offer ultrasound treatment but apparently that is rare these days as they tend to come back. Whatever the prognosis the likelihood is I will have to go private if I have it done before our planned exodus at end of Sept. Although I have almost lost hope with my current job offer and am having trouble finding another.
Anyone got any idea of cost for this kind of treatment
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