Importing a car to Canada

Old Aug 19th 2001, 5:49 pm
  #1  
Puneet
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Hi

I had put my Honda Accord in my Goods to follow list when I landed in Canada 1 year
ago . I want to get it by This Dec . Please let me know

1) Will I have to pay any Duty on it even though it is a prt of goods to follow list

2) The canadian customs told me at that time this "GOODS TO FOLLOW" list is valid
for 5 years.

3) What documents do I carry with me when going to US to get the car to prove
my valid PR

4) Can I get the stuff in instalments instead of once with my "Goods to follow" list

Please reply
 
Old Aug 20th 2001, 3:51 pm
  #2  
Rich Wales
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"Puneet" wrote:

> I had put my Honda Accord in my Goods to follow list when I landed in Canada 1
> year ago. . . .

> Will I have to pay any Duty on it even though it is a part of goods to
> follow list?

My understanding is that the customs duty and tax situation will be the same as if
you had brought the car with you on the day you landed.

Assuming you were a first-time immigrant to Canada, and you had owned
(i.e., fully paid for) and used the car in the US before immigrating to Canada, the
car should probably be free of duty and taxes under the "settlers' effects"
exemption.

Note, though, that you will still have to pay the standard fee to have the car
processed through the "Registrar of Imported Vehicles" (RIV). The RIV's web site is:
http://www.riv.ca

You should also make sure that your car is of a make/model/year that is legal for
importation to Canada. Most, but not all, cars built for the US market are legal for
importation to Canada, but there are some exceptions. The RIV people should be able
to tell you; you can also find the Transport Canada list of permitted vehicles at:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/Impor...h/im3idx_e.htm

> Can I get the stuff in instalments instead of once with my "Goods to
> follow" list?

Yes, you can import "goods to follow" in multiple instalments.

Rich Wales [email protected] http://www.webcom.com/richw/
*NOTE: I've lived in both Canada and the US and have dual citizenship.
*DISCLAIMER: I am not a lawyer, professional immigration consultant,
or consular officer. My comments are for discussion purposes only and
are not intended to be relied upon as legal or professional advice.
 
Old Aug 22nd 2001, 6:45 pm
  #3  
Rr
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Puneet

You also need your title stamped, before you move the car.

I would recommened that after you confirm that you can import the car by checking
out www.riv.ca.

I would also recommend using the truck border. This will save you about a
$100 canadian.

rr

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Old Aug 25th 2001, 10:46 am
  #4  
Acltd
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I am also in a similar situation. Honda Accord Car and going to land in Canada.

Could some one clarify this:

1. I called up Canada Customs, they said I have to pay 7% GST even though I will be
landing as a pemanent resident ??? (Am I not eligible to bring it without duties
and taxes as in "settlers effects" ?)

2. Who has to stamp the title of the car ? The car's title is clear as stated in a
letter from the banker of the original owner. The car has not yet been registered
in my name, but the owner has assigned the title to be transferred in my name. Do
I still have to get it registered here (in USA) in my name ?

3. Which one is a trucks border ? (where I can save $100).

4. Also the car does not have daytime running lights, what is the best place to get
it installed ? It is a Honda Accord 2000 model (4 door sedan).Earlier somebody
suggested to my husband (in this NG) that Canadian tire is the most economical,
but I have called up four of their stores, and they have no idea
!!!!.

Thanks very much in advance for all your help.

Manisha.
 
Old Sep 7th 2001, 4:51 pm
  #5  
Rich Wales
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"Manisha" wrote:

> I called up Canada Customs, they said I have to pay 7% GST even though I will
> be landing as a permanent resident ??? (Am I not eligible to bring it without
> duties and taxes as in "settlers effects" ?)

My understanding is that when someone is moving to Canada to settle there for the
first time, he/she is entitled to import anything as "settlers' effects" without
paying any duties or taxes -- including a motor vehicle -- as long as the car has
been in his/her ownership, possession and use prior to settling in Canada.

In other words, before you import the car, you (not a bank or other lienholder) must
have been the official owner of the car; you must have physically possessed the car
(not simply promised to be deliv- ered to you by a previous owner); and you must have
actually driven in the car (just buying it and arranging for it to be shipped to you
in Canada isn't good enough).

Did the Canada Customs official specifically and explicitly tell you that your
vehicle would not qualify as settlers' effects? If yes, were you given a reason?

Note that you will still have to pay the importation fee (generally C$182) to the
Registrar of Imported Vehicles (RIV), even if you are importing the car as
settlers' effects.

> Who has to stamp the title of the car?

I believe this statement was a reference to a US requirement that any vehicle being
permanently exported from the US must be inspected by US Customs before leaving the
country. Part of this procedure involves the vehicle's title being inspected and
stamped by US Customs.

I have read conflicting accounts of (1) whether US Customs offices really care about
this requirement, and (2) whether Canada Customs cares if the importer of a vehicle
has gone through the procedure or not. When I immigrated to Canada and imported a car
in early 1993, the moving company I used to ship our stuff negligently failed to have
the car inspected by US Customs before crossing the border, but Canadian customs
officials didn't even ask about this omission. That was almost nine years ago,
though, and things might be different now.

> The car has not yet been registered in my name, but the owner has assigned the
> title to be transferred in my name.

Unless the title is in your name, you will have a very hard time convincing Canada
Customs that you "owned" the car prior to its importation -- one of the requirements
for claiming the settlers' effects exemption.

> Which one is a trucks border ? (where I can save $100).

I have no idea what the person who said this was talking about. At one time, the RIV
importation fee was higher at certain border crossings. Now, however, my
understanding is that it is always C$182 -- unless you enter via Quebec, in which
case it's C$197.

> Also the car does not have daytime running lights, what is the best place to
> get it installed?

Either at a Honda dealer in Canada, or at Canadian Tire. Note that a Honda dealer may
have access to the same DRL module that is put in vehicles built for (and sold in)
Canada -- which will probably mean your car will use the centre high-beams (at low
power) as DRL's. If you have the job done at Canadian Tire, on the other hand,
they'll probably use a generic DRL module that will turn on all your lights
automatically (just as if you had turned on your low-beams manually).

Rich Wales [email protected] http://www.webcom.com/richw/
*NOTE: I've lived in both Canada and the US and have dual citizenship.
*DISCLAIMER: I am not a lawyer, professional immigration consultant,
or consular officer. My comments are for discussion purposes only and
are not intended to be relied upon as legal or professional advice.
 
Old Sep 10th 2001, 3:19 pm
  #6  
Jim Humphries
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Importing a car also involves ensuring that it was manufactured to Canadian
specifications. You would need a manufacturer's certificate to that effect. The main
other concerns are that the vehicle is legally licensed, that you are the owner, and
that you have properly insured the car. I somehow doubt the latter, if the plates
have not been changed to your name. Your hsuband does not have to meet you at the
border for any landing purpose. Jim Humphries

ACLtd wrote:
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Old Sep 10th 2001, 3:56 pm
  #7  
Rich Wales
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Jim Humphries wrote:

> Importing a car also involves ensuring that it was manufactured to Canadian
> specifications. You would need a manufacturer's certificate to that effect.

To the best of my knowledge, this is NOT correct when a vehicle is being imported
from the US. A vehicle can be imported into Canada from the US if it is certified as
meeting US specs, is on Transport Canada's list of makes/models/years which are
permissible for importation, and if any required modifications are performed. The
car's US certification will generally take the form of the sticker or metal plate
attached to the car at the factory.

Reference: http://www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/Impor...sh/Imind_e.htm

Rich Wales [email protected] http://www.webcom.com/richw/
*NOTE: I've lived in both Canada and the US and have dual citizenship.
*DISCLAIMER: I am not a lawyer, professional immigration consultant,
or consular officer. My comments are for discussion purposes only and
are not intended to be relied upon as legal or professional advice.
 

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