IELTS

Old Oct 20th 2003, 9:25 pm
  #1  
Mark Fitzhenry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default IELTS

I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to take the
IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and consider
myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I have in
the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two to
gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should I
still take the test??
Thanks,
Mark.
 
Old Oct 21st 2003, 3:33 am
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof of
your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
relevant documents in the package.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to take
the
    > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and consider
    > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I have
in
    > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two to
    > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should I
    > still take the test??
    > Thanks,
    > Mark.
 
Old Oct 21st 2003, 6:40 am
  #3  
Webcrawler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

Just make sure you don't make any spelling or grammatical errors in your
submission letter )

"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:_kclb.23749$i92.12334@clgrps13...
    > No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof of
    > your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
    > evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
    > being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
    > relevant documents in the package.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > ________________________________
    > "mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to take
    > the
    > > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and consider
    > > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I
have
    > in
    > > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two
to
    > > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should I
    > > still take the test??
    > > Thanks,
    > > Mark.
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 21st 2003, 1:31 pm
  #4  
Ek
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

This might seem off topic. I took IELTS at the beginning of October. How
surprised I was to see a couple of American citizens native English speakers
who took general training test with me. I asked them what was the reason for
them taking this test. They said - immigration to Canada.

EK

"WebCrawler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Just make sure you don't make any spelling or grammatical errors in your
    > submission letter )
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:_kclb.23749$i92.12334@clgrps13...
    > > No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof
of
    > > your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
    > > evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
    > > being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
    > > relevant documents in the package.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to
take
    > > the
    > > > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and
consider
    > > > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I
    > have
    > > in
    > > > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two
    > to
    > > > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should
I
    > > > still take the test??
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > Mark.
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 22nd 2003, 1:55 am
  #5  
Uma
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

To Andrew Miller,

I am indian national - Just got my British Citizenship on (Aug, 2003).

Should I need to take IELTS test, because I am Indian and then become
British. - I am confused.

Thanks,
Uma




"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:_kclb.23749$i92.12334@clgrps13...
    > No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof of
    > your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
    > evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
    > being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
    > relevant documents in the package.
    > --
    > ../..
    > Andrew Miller
    > Immigration Consultant
    > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > email: [email protected]
    > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > ________________________________
    > "mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to take
    > the
    > > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and consider
    > > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I
have
    > in
    > > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two
to
    > > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should I
    > > still take the test??
    > > Thanks,
    > > Mark.
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 22nd 2003, 3:02 am
  #6  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

English is not your native language, so the answer is yes, you should take
the test if you want objective proof of your language proficiency and points
awarded for it accordingly.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Uma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > To Andrew Miller,
    > I am indian national - Just got my British Citizenship on (Aug, 2003).
    > Should I need to take IELTS test, because I am Indian and then become
    > British. - I am confused.
    > Thanks,
    > Uma
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:_kclb.23749$i92.12334@clgrps13...
    > > No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof
of
    > > your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
    > > evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
    > > being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
    > > relevant documents in the package.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to
take
    > > the
    > > > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and
consider
    > > > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I
    > have
    > > in
    > > > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two
    > to
    > > > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should
I
    > > > still take the test??
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > Mark.
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 22nd 2003, 3:02 am
  #7  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

P.S.

Native language also means your mother's tongue if you still have problems
figuring out what your native language is.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"Uma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > To Andrew Miller,
    > I am indian national - Just got my British Citizenship on (Aug, 2003).
    > Should I need to take IELTS test, because I am Indian and then become
    > British. - I am confused.
    > Thanks,
    > Uma
    > "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:_kclb.23749$i92.12334@clgrps13...
    > > No, you don't need to take the test - but you still must provide proof
of
    > > your language proficiency. For native English speakers the sufficient
    > > evidence would be in the form of own submission letter stating facts of
    > > being born and educated in English speaking country and pointing out to
    > > relevant documents in the package.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > ../..
    > >
    > > Andrew Miller
    > > Immigration Consultant
    > > Vancouver, British Columbia
    > > email: [email protected]
    > > (delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > >
    > > "mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to
take
    > > the
    > > > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and
consider
    > > > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I
    > have
    > > in
    > > > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two
    > to
    > > > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should
I
    > > > still take the test??
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > Mark.
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 22nd 2003, 7:12 pm
  #8  
Mark Fitzhenry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

Thanks for your advice Andrew, it's cleared that one up at last!!

Mark.


"mark fitzhenry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I have read many conflicting articles on whether it is necessary to take
the
    > IELTS test. I am British, have lived in the UK all my life and consider
    > myself to be of high profiency when it comes to the four modules. I have
in
    > the past completed one year of English 'A' level, not the required two to
    > gain the qualification though. (Left college to get a job)!! Should I
    > still take the test??
    > Thanks,
    > Mark.
 
Old Oct 22nd 2003, 7:42 pm
  #9  
Banned
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 72
Canadius is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: IELTS

What a stupid and again an incorrect advice from Miller!!!

Native means "being the place or environment in which a person was born or a thing came into being" or "born in a particular place or country". (source: Webster, Infolplease etc.) It does not have anything to do with your ancestors or parents.

You said that you "have lived in the UK all my life". So, you are a native! The CIC clearly states to provide conclusive proof if you English is not your native language.

You are confused because you are listening such stupid advices from Miler and similar kind. You don't need to take any language tests. Provide that you attended a regular school in UK and related evidence, don't waste time listening the "so-called-expert" stupid advices and do not take the test.
Canadius is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 1:33 am
  #10  
Vitali Malicky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

"Canadius" <member@british_expats.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > What a stupid and again an incorrect advice from Miller!!!
    > Native means "being the place or environment in which a person was born
    > or a thing came into being" or "born in a particular place or country".
    > (source: Webster, Infolplease etc.) It does not have anything to do with
    > your ancestors or parents.

Oh, sir, you read such serious books, suggest Andrew Miller's advice stupid,
and make stupid mistakes in your posting...

    > You are confused because you are listening such stupid advices from
    > Miler and similar kind. You don't need to take any language tests.
    > Provide that you attended a regular school in UK and related evidence,
    > don't waste time listening the "so-called-expert" stupid advices and do
    > not take the test.

to listen TO something/somebody

I'm afraid you just blueprinted "similar kind" from your native language...

advice NOT adviceS, NOR AN advice, at least you can use "a piece of advice",
"pieces of advice", but "advice" is always "advice"

You might have wanted to use "so-called-expert'S" or "so-called-expertS'",
but it's up to you.

I'm afraid, I don't think the man has to "Provide that you attended a[...]"
maybe he has to "Prove that you attended a [...] and PRODUCE related
evidence"

Logically you should have put "." after "evidence" and begun a new sentence,
with a capital letter, but again it is up to you.


WBR
Life

    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 4:35 am
  #11  
Banned
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 72
Canadius is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: IELTS

Can you make a point related to the subject of the post or you are so mentally impotent that you need to hunt for grammatical mistakes in an informal Internet post?

The point is that you are trying to correct mistakes in my casual post and you are making much more mistakes in a shorter post.

For example:
1. You don't need comma after Oh
2. You need instead "advice stupid" - "advice is stupid"
3. You don't finish first sentence with "..." when you have an "and"
4. Pleonasm: "I'm afraid, I don't think"
5. You can omit both commas in ",with a capital letter,"
Canadius is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 5:48 am
  #12  
Webcrawler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

Can't you guys just "agree to disagree"?
This thread has long ceased to be of any value to anyone.

Thanks.

"Canadius" <member@british_expats.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Can you make a point related to the subject of the post or you are so
    > mentally impotent that you need to hunt for grammatical mistakes in an
    > informal Internet post?
    > The point is that you are trying to correct mistakes in my casual post
    > and you are making much more mistakes in a shorter post.
    > For example:
    > 1. You don't need comma after Oh
    > 2. You need instead "advice stupid" - "advice is stupid"
    > 3. You don't finish first sentence with "..." when you have an "and"
    > 4. Pleonasm: "I'm afraid, I don't think"
    > 5. You can omit both commas in ",with a capital letter,"
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 6:47 am
  #13  
Banned
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 72
Canadius is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: IELTS

[Back to the topic ... ]

It is a very simple situation, the guy is born in the UK, lived all his life there - therefore, he should not take the exam!

The advice of the "expert" Miller is to take the exam! That is wrong and stupid.

The cost of taking the exam, when is not needed, is substantial. A potentail immigrant will need to loose hours preparing for the test - no matter how good is his English - and that costs time, nerves and money. Also, there is a lost opportunity cost plus direct expense of taking the exam and sending the results.

Irresponsible advices are costing and confusing immigrants and that is the point which only morons can not understand.
Canadius is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 8:34 am
  #14  
Julio
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: IELTS

You are just a stupid idiot who lacks simple comprehension.

As far as I see Andrew responded to the guy born in UK with proper
advice that he needs to include his own submission letter, not to take
the test, you moron.

The other poster "Uma' claims just getting UK citizenship and being
born in India - this is why Andrew recommended taking the test.

We all know that you don't like those who read, comprehend, understand
and follow laws, regulations, manual and memoranda - but this is
exactly what must be followed, not you stupid, uneducated and rude
remarks.

Here is one for you too:


/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'_'7,
/'/ / / /"
('( ' ' _~/
\ '
'\' \ _7
\ (
\ \.


have a nice day...


On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 18:47:12 +0000, Canadius
<member@british_expats.com> wrote:

    >[Back to the topic ... ]
    >It is a very simple situation, the guy is born in the UK, lived all his
    >life there - therefore, he should not take the exam!
    >The advice of the "expert" Miller is to take the exam! That is wrong
    >and stupid.
    >The cost of taking the exam, when is not needed, is substantial. A
    >potentail immigrant will need to loose hours preparing for the test - no
    >matter how good is his English - and that costs time, nerves and money.
    >Also, there is a lost opportunity cost plus direct expense of taking the
    >exam and sending the results.
    >Irresponsible advices are costing and confusing immigrants and that is
    >the point which only morons can not understand.
 
Old Oct 23rd 2003, 12:04 pm
  #15  
Banned
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 72
Canadius is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: IELTS

For someone like Julio I should not waste my words - I simply explained that native does not mean: " mother's tongue " but country of burth.

Implication of the wrong advice and intrpretations from the "expert(s)", his employees, and blind fllowers are that some US and UK born people are taking the exam as can be heard.
Canadius is offline  

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.