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Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

Old Oct 13th 2003, 4:29 am
  #1  
Oak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

Dear surfers,


I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
have something which I still don't quite understand though...

Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
of job in Canada?

Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?

Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?


Thank you very much for your opinions.


Oak
 
Old Oct 13th 2003, 7:57 am
  #2  
Robert
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

"Oak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Dear surfers,
    > I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
    > have something which I still don't quite understand though...
    > Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    > related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    > of job in Canada?

All of the above.
I had to take the canadian "millwrights test" after i found that most
companies would not employ people with my european certifications.
but then found the catch 22 thing about actual job experience.
My attitude was not to "take no for an answer"
You can find employment in your related fields but without canadian tickets
they DO tend to pay less than someone with a "Canadian" ticket

    > Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    > of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?

Yes they do. I had to work on a job over here where the guys english was so
bad he had to have a translator. and wanted the machine i was installing set
up in chineese. I went back on a follow up job about a week later and he had
been replaced. the reason i was given was that it took longer to tell him
about a task than it did to do it. IMHO this is a good part of the reason
for the IELTS & TEF.

    > Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?
There have been a couple of posts recently with links you may find useful,
not quite step by step.
I dont think there is such a thing as all people vary insofar as
communications, job skills etc etc.

Have included a mixed bag of links where you might find more info.
Oh and dont pay to join any forums most of them just leech thier stuff from
here or the free govt. sites anyhow

http://www.morningstar.ca/globalhome...ator/index.asp
http://www.settlement.org/index.html
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/index.html
http://www.promptinfo.ca/TorontoStar...s%20Sept5.html
http://www.tcscanadainc.com
http://ca.search.yahoo.com/search/ca?vc=&p=IELTS
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/menu/jobs.shtml

    > Thank you very much for your opinions.
    > Oak
 
Old Oct 13th 2003, 9:28 am
  #3  
S P Arif Sahari Wibowo
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

On Mon, 13 Oct 2003, Oak wrote:
    >I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still

It is, indeed, especially in this time of the year.

    >Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    >related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    >of job in Canada?

Depend on the meaning of 'experience' in the particular context.

You see, the term 'Canadian Experience' doesn't refer to particular
experience, instead it distinguish whether the experience a person talking
about was acquired in Canada (or probably with Canadian institution) or
not.

For example, when applying a job that require experience in packaging
glass, then the Canadian Experience will mean the experience in packaging
glass *in Canada*. In in the other hand, another job doesn't need
experience, just need trustworthiness, then Canadian Experience will mean
any experience that can show the trustworthiness.

    >Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    >of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?

Probably yes. Depend on the job, obviously.

    >Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?

Get a job! Wait, to get a job you need Canadian Experience!
Well, anyway you see the problem facing new immigrant to enter the job
market in Canada. Most people I asked, generally told me to try and try
again.

This is my take on the situation: businesses in Canada generally are
conservative, not willing to take risk (probably most sucessful risk taker
moved south of the border :-) ). Therefore they want to minimize risk in
getting new employee. They want guarantee that the employee really can do
the job and will not harm the company. Previous experiences do count into
this guarantee, but experience in Canada will be much better, since more
likely the employer use comparable standard. Taking employee without
Canadian Experience is more risky, and therefore less likely happen.

Good luck!

--
Stephan Paul Arif Sahari Wibowo
_____ _____ _____ _____
/____ /____/ /____/ /____ [email protected]
_____/ / / / _____/ http://www.arifsaha.com/
 
Old Oct 13th 2003, 1:45 pm
  #4  
Robert
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

"S P Arif Sahari Wibowo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:Pine.LNX.4.55.0310131409310.151....parokinet.org...
    > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003, Oak wrote:
    > >I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
    > It is, indeed, especially in this time of the year.
    > >Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    > >related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    > >of job in Canada?
    > Depend on the meaning of 'experience' in the particular context.
    > You see, the term 'Canadian Experience' doesn't refer to particular
    > experience, instead it distinguish whether the experience a person talking
    > about was acquired in Canada (or probably with Canadian institution) or
    > not.
    > For example, when applying a job that require experience in packaging
    > glass, then the Canadian Experience will mean the experience in packaging
    > glass *in Canada*. In in the other hand, another job doesn't need
    > experience, just need trustworthiness, then Canadian Experience will mean
    > any experience that can show the trustworthiness.
    > >Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    > >of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?
    > Probably yes. Depend on the job, obviously.
    > >Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?
    > Get a job! Wait, to get a job you need Canadian Experience!
    > Well, anyway you see the problem facing new immigrant to enter the job
    > market in Canada. Most people I asked, generally told me to try and try
    > again.
    > This is my take on the situation: businesses in Canada generally are
    > conservative, not willing to take risk (probably most sucessful risk taker
    > moved south of the border :-) ). Therefore they want to minimize risk in
    > getting new employee. They want guarantee that the employee really can do
    > the job and will not harm the company. Previous experiences do count into
    > this guarantee, but experience in Canada will be much better, since more
    > likely the employer use comparable standard. Taking employee without
    > Canadian Experience is more risky, and therefore less likely happen.
I think a lot depends on your attitude. Stephan has some valid points BUT !
Things are never as simple as yes or no. Everyone is different.
Having said that I had to take the "Millwright" test is misleading, I got my
first job
(with reasonable pay) because of my City & Guilds qualifications, Because
English was my first language,
because I was prepared for Canada.

I have no idea where you are from, so without knowing you, your background
etc. etc.
all anyone can give you is generalised answers.

    > Good luck!
    > --
    > Stephan Paul Arif Sahari Wibowo
    > _____ _____ _____ _____
    > /____ /____/ /____/ /____ [email protected]
    > _____/ / / / _____/ http://www.arifsaha.com/
 
Old Oct 14th 2003, 6:54 am
  #5  
Oak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

First of all, I would like to thank S P Arif Sahari Wibowo and Robert
for your generous help.

In response to Robert's question, I was trained down south (U.S.) and
received both my undergrad and grad degrees in Computer Science.
Technically, I am a software developer but I did some SW/HW project
management, integration, and customer related jobs for the last few
years in Asia even though I did develop a large scale software
application for about two years back in the States.

Well, English is not my first language but I guess I don't have any
difficulty communicating with other people. One thing I want to
mention is that I just love to work with people from different
cultures. I don't know why but I just love it so much. Maybe that's
why I am here :-)

I understand that it's very difficult to find a job here. I don't
mind doing any job to gain experience. My concern is whether doing a
none related job will count as the Canadian Experience for my field.

So...er..., what's your suggestion, my friend? By the way, I still do
not have regular internet access so I will apologize if I can't reply
to you guys' post immediately. Finally, I really appreciate your time
and concern. Good luck on everything.


Oak




"Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]. cable.rogers.com>...
    > "S P Arif Sahari Wibowo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:Pine.LNX.4.55.0310131409310.151....parokinet.org...
    > > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003, Oak wrote:
    > > >I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
    > >
    > > It is, indeed, especially in this time of the year.
    > >
    > > >Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    > > >related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    > > >of job in Canada?
    > >
    > > Depend on the meaning of 'experience' in the particular context.
    > >
    > > You see, the term 'Canadian Experience' doesn't refer to particular
    > > experience, instead it distinguish whether the experience a person talking
    > > about was acquired in Canada (or probably with Canadian institution) or
    > > not.
    > >
    > > For example, when applying a job that require experience in packaging
    > > glass, then the Canadian Experience will mean the experience in packaging
    > > glass *in Canada*. In in the other hand, another job doesn't need
    > > experience, just need trustworthiness, then Canadian Experience will mean
    > > any experience that can show the trustworthiness.
    > >
    > > >Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    > > >of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?
    > >
    > > Probably yes. Depend on the job, obviously.
    > >
    > > >Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?
    > >
    > > Get a job! Wait, to get a job you need Canadian Experience!
    > > Well, anyway you see the problem facing new immigrant to enter the job
    > > market in Canada. Most people I asked, generally told me to try and try
    > > again.
    > >
    > > This is my take on the situation: businesses in Canada generally are
    > > conservative, not willing to take risk (probably most sucessful risk taker
    > > moved south of the border :-) ). Therefore they want to minimize risk in
    > > getting new employee. They want guarantee that the employee really can do
    > > the job and will not harm the company. Previous experiences do count into
    > > this guarantee, but experience in Canada will be much better, since more
    > > likely the employer use comparable standard. Taking employee without
    > > Canadian Experience is more risky, and therefore less likely happen.
    > >
    > I think a lot depends on your attitude. Stephan has some valid points BUT !
    > Things are never as simple as yes or no. Everyone is different.
    > Having said that I had to take the "Millwright" test is misleading, I got my
    > first job
    > (with reasonable pay) because of my City & Guilds qualifications, Because
    > English was my first language,
    > because I was prepared for Canada.
    >
    > I have no idea where you are from, so without knowing you, your background
    > etc. etc.
    > all anyone can give you is generalised answers.
    >
    > > Good luck!
    > >
    > > --
    > > Stephan Paul Arif Sahari Wibowo
    > > _____ _____ _____ _____
    > > /____ /____/ /____/ /____ [email protected]
    > > _____/ / / / _____/ http://www.arifsaha.com/
 
Old Oct 14th 2003, 7:07 am
  #6  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 155
Kismit is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

I've never been to Canada (and will be there very soon) but my initial reaction is that if you take up a job in any unrelated field, it won't give you an edge in your field. In my opinion (for whatever it's worth), "Canadian Experience" means relevant experience in your field in Canada. E.g., I'm a consultant here in the US. If I take up employment in marketing in Canada, switiching back to consulting in Canada will be quite difficult.

Kismit












Originally posted by Oak
First of all, I would like to thank S P Arif Sahari Wibowo and Robert
for your generous help.

In response to Robert's question, I was trained down south (U.S.) and
received both my undergrad and grad degrees in Computer Science.
Technically, I am a software developer but I did some SW/HW project
management, integration, and customer related jobs for the last few
years in Asia even though I did develop a large scale software
application for about two years back in the States.

Well, English is not my first language but I guess I don't have any
difficulty communicating with other people. One thing I want to
mention is that I just love to work with people from different
cultures. I don't know why but I just love it so much. Maybe that's
why I am here :-)

I understand that it's very difficult to find a job here. I don't
mind doing any job to gain experience. My concern is whether doing a
none related job will count as the Canadian Experience for my field.

So...er..., what's your suggestion, my friend? By the way, I still do
not have regular internet access so I will apologize if I can't reply
to you guys' post immediately. Finally, I really appreciate your time
and concern. Good luck on everything.


Oak




"Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]. cable.rogers.com>...
    > "S P Arif Sahari Wibowo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:Pine.LNX.4.55.0310131409310.151....parokinet.org...
    > > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003, Oak wrote:
    > > >I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
    > >
    > > It is, indeed, especially in this time of the year.
    > >
    > > >Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    > > >related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    > > >of job in Canada?
    > >
    > > Depend on the meaning of 'experience' in the particular context.
    > >
    > > You see, the term 'Canadian Experience' doesn't refer to particular
    > > experience, instead it distinguish whether the experience a person talking
    > > about was acquired in Canada (or probably with Canadian institution) or
    > > not.
    > >
    > > For example, when applying a job that require experience in packaging
    > > glass, then the Canadian Experience will mean the experience in packaging
    > > glass *in Canada*. In in the other hand, another job doesn't need
    > > experience, just need trustworthiness, then Canadian Experience will mean
    > > any experience that can show the trustworthiness.
    > >
    > > >Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    > > >of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?
    > >
    > > Probably yes. Depend on the job, obviously.
    > >
    > > >Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?
    > >
    > > Get a job! Wait, to get a job you need Canadian Experience!
    > > Well, anyway you see the problem facing new immigrant to enter the job
    > > market in Canada. Most people I asked, generally told me to try and try
    > > again.
    > >
    > > This is my take on the situation: businesses in Canada generally are
    > > conservative, not willing to take risk (probably most sucessful risk taker
    > > moved south of the border :-) ). Therefore they want to minimize risk in
    > > getting new employee. They want guarantee that the employee really can do
    > > the job and will not harm the company. Previous experiences do count into
    > > this guarantee, but experience in Canada will be much better, since more
    > > likely the employer use comparable standard. Taking employee without
    > > Canadian Experience is more risky, and therefore less likely happen.
    > >
    > I think a lot depends on your attitude. Stephan has some valid points BUT !
    > Things are never as simple as yes or no. Everyone is different.
    > Having said that I had to take the "Millwright" test is misleading, I got my
    > first job
    > (with reasonable pay) because of my City & Guilds qualifications, Because
    > English was my first language,
    > because I was prepared for Canada.
    >
    > I have no idea where you are from, so without knowing you, your background
    > etc. etc.
    > all anyone can give you is generalised answers.
    >
    > > Good luck!
    > >
    > > --
    > > Stephan Paul Arif Sahari Wibowo
    > > _____ _____ _____ _____
    > > /____ /____/ /____/ /____ [email protected]
    > > _____/ / / / _____/ http://www.arifsaha.com/
Kismit is offline  
Old Oct 14th 2003, 8:30 am
  #7  
Robert
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

"Oak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > First of all, I would like to thank S P Arif Sahari Wibowo and Robert
    > for your generous help.
    > In response to Robert's question, I was trained down south (U.S.) and
    > received both my undergrad and grad degrees in Computer Science.
    > Technically, I am a software developer but I did some SW/HW project
    > management, integration, and customer related jobs for the last few
    > years in Asia even though I did develop a large scale software
    > application for about two years back in the States.
    > Well, English is not my first language but I guess I don't have any
    > difficulty communicating with other people. One thing I want to
    > mention is that I just love to work with people from different
    > cultures. I don't know why but I just love it so much. Maybe that's
    > why I am here :-)
    > I understand that it's very difficult to find a job here. I don't
    > mind doing any job to gain experience. My concern is whether doing a
    > none related job will count as the Canadian Experience for my field.
    > So...er..., what's your suggestion, my friend? By the way, I still do
    > not have regular internet access so I will apologize if I can't reply
    > to you guys' post immediately. Finally, I really appreciate your time
    > and concern. Good luck on everything.
    > Oak
<snip>

US experience will probably help you out a great deal.
And your typed English is probably better than mine ;-)
Your attitude about doing anything to get experience is probably going to be
an asset too !

Its hard to judge people by internet but, from what you say and the way you
say it I would hazard a guess that you will do fine.
 
Old Oct 14th 2003, 4:15 pm
  #8  
S P Arif Sahari Wibowo
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

On Tue, 14 Oct 2003, Oak wrote:
    >I understand that it's very difficult to find a job here. I don't
    >mind doing any job to gain experience. My concern is whether doing a
    >none related job will count as the Canadian Experience for my field.

IMHO, short answer is: the Canadian Experience we acquire *should relate*
to our previous experience, if we want to stay in that field. At least,
part of the job we do in Canada should be similar to the job we did
before.

In my observation in Canada, people who just get any job, didn't try to
get either experience or credential in their previous field, will unlikely
can go back to their previous field.

For the reason, IMHO, let's continue my previous post. As I said Canadian
businesses don't want to take risk and Canadian businesses feel that
taking employee without Canadian Experience is riskier. This is because
Canadian businesses feel that experience outside Canada is less comparable
to (or harder to compare with) experience with other Canadian businesses.

To overcome this, we should come with a way to enable the businesses to
compare our previous experience with experience with other Canadian
businesses. Here is what Canadian Experience for. In simple view, if we
say "we were level 9 there", the Canadian businesses didn't know whether
that level 9 over there is also level 9 over here. If we have Canadian
Experience in which we prove we are level 9, therefore Canadian businesses
can see that our previous level 9 is similar to Canadian level 9.

Therefore obviously, the Canadian Experience we acquire should relate to
our previous experience, to allow the Canadian Experience to be used as
proof for our previous experience.

So, IMHO, as we gain Canadian Experience (in your field), we may find that
some businesses become more and more willing to value more of our previous
experience. So let's say when we just arrive, the businesses may disregard
all of our - say- 8 years of previous experience, as we work for 6 month,
more businesses willing to consider us in 2 years requirement. As we work
for 2 years, more businesses will regard all the 8 years experience.

Easy, huh? Well, it require that we get a job in our field that require
none or minimum experience. Well, the difficulties are:

1. That kind of job is very limited, and a lot of people want it
(immigrant, fresh graduate, people changing career, etc.)
-> Therefore, try, try again...

2. Most of jobs never reach *any* publications (media, websites), and jobs
with easier requirement, will more likely to gone first before reaching
publications. As I said Canadian business don't want to take risk, so they
much prefer get employee from referal (from existing employee, agents),
than unknown applicant. So job opening will circulate in internal memo
first before considered to be published. So, mostly only jobs with
difficult requirement published.
-> Therefore, widen our network, know more people, come to group events,
etc. In fact I observes some job seekers work in 'gang': as one employed,
slowly (as openings come up) he pulled the others work in the company
using referal.

3. We might be considered over-qualified. Funnily, it seems that
businesses often use different standard to determine that we are
over-qualified than to consider we are under-qualified. While to consider
under-qualified businesses disregard our previour experience, to consider
over-qualified businesses take all our previour experience. In fact, as
crazy as it is, it is possible to be over-qualified and under-qualified at
the same time.
-> Therefore: disguise your previous credential carefully.


Your previous US education may help, although IMHO limited, since it is
many years ago.


    >By the way, I still do not have regular internet access so I will
    >apologize if I can't reply to you guys' post immediately.

Completely off topic: if you plan to get broadband, try contact agents
first before contact the provider directly: you may get a better deal.

--
Stephan Paul Arif Sahari Wibowo
_____ _____ _____ _____
/____ /____/ /____/ /____ [email protected]
_____/ / / / _____/ http://www.arifsaha.com/
 
Old Oct 14th 2003, 6:48 pm
  #9  
Mark Bell
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

All very helpful advice and information. I would add one additional
web site to help reinforce that employers really care about
communication skills, etc.:

Employability Skills 2000+
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/educat...ity-skills.htm

Employability Skills 2000+ are the critical skills you need in the
workplace—whether you are self-employed or working for others.
Employability Skills 2000+ include communication, problem solving,
positive attitudes and behaviours, adaptability, working with others,
and science, technology and mathematics skills.


    > "Oak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Dear surfers,
    > >
    > >
    > > I just landed here in Canada. It's a beautiful country but I still
    > > have something which I still don't quite understand though...
    > >
    > > Does Canadian Experience mean that I need experience working in a
    > > related field in Canada or I just need working experience for any kind
    > > of job in Canada?
    >
    > All of the above.
    > I had to take the canadian "millwrights test" after i found that most
    > companies would not employ people with my european certifications.
    > but then found the catch 22 thing about actual job experience.
    > My attitude was not to "take no for an answer"
    > You can find employment in your related fields but without canadian tickets
    > they DO tend to pay less than someone with a "Canadian" ticket
    >
    > >
    > > Do employers really care about communication skill, language barrier
    > > of a newcomer, or the experience related to his/her field?
    > >
    >
    > Yes they do. I had to work on a job over here where the guys english was so
    > bad he had to have a translator. and wanted the machine i was installing set
    > up in chineese. I went back on a follow up job about a week later and he had
    > been replaced. the reason i was given was that it took longer to tell him
    > about a task than it did to do it. IMHO this is a good part of the reason
    > for the IELTS & TEF.
    >
    > > Any suggestion in getting Canadian Experience step by step?
    > >
    > >
    > There have been a couple of posts recently with links you may find useful,
    > not quite step by step.
    > I dont think there is such a thing as all people vary insofar as
    > communications, job skills etc etc.
    >
    > Have included a mixed bag of links where you might find more info.
    > Oh and dont pay to join any forums most of them just leech thier stuff from
    > here or the free govt. sites anyhow
    >
    > http://www.morningstar.ca/globalhome...ator/index.asp
    > http://www.settlement.org/index.html
    > http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/index.html
    > http://www.promptinfo.ca/TorontoStar...s%20Sept5.html
    > http://www.tcscanadainc.com
    > http://ca.search.yahoo.com/search/ca?vc=&p=IELTS
    > http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/menu/jobs.shtml
    >
    > > Thank you very much for your opinions.
    > >
    > >
    > > Oak
 
Old Oct 15th 2003, 1:58 am
  #10  
Benaam
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

The canadian experience syndrome has always been a bane for
immigrants. It is a well known fact.
as far back as 1969, one person I know, migrated to canada from UK
after studying and working in the field of wireless RF frequency
communications.
He too was aked to show Canadian experience so simply left Canada and
settled in USA where no one asked fro american experience.
Fast forward to year 1998. Another friend of mine, a brillient
mechanical engineer form Pakistan for trying desperately for jobs,
even odd jobs.
He went to one restaurent for dishwashing job and hold your
breath...what was he asked to show? Canadian experience of course.
he left Canada the next week forever.
So it is indeed a serious problem but don't think it is just racist
strategy or anything.
Actually the businessmen here in Canada are still very conservative
and thats why this problem exists.
secondly the media tends to prortray other countries as backward,
almost primitive so employers have pre baked notions.
Thirdly it is more of a learnt response sysndrome....a asks for it
because he saw B asking for it and so on.
It is frustrating but you have to be pateint, and learn ho to beat the
system...talk to others who did it.
 
Old Oct 15th 2003, 2:21 am
  #11  
Oak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

To S P Arif Sahari Wibowo, Robert, and Kismit:


I really appreciate you guys' opinions which had given me a very good lesson.


Take care, my friends!



Oak
 
Old Oct 17th 2003, 3:30 am
  #12  
Benaam
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

This

http://www.thestar.ca/NASApp/cs/Cont...=1066255810946


[email protected] (Oak) wrote in message news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > To S P Arif Sahari Wibowo, Robert, and Kismit:
    >
    >
    > I really appreciate you guys' opinions which had given me a very good lesson.
    >
    >
    > Take care, my friends!
    >
    >
    >
    > Oak
 
Old Oct 19th 2003, 1:51 pm
  #13  
Oak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help: What does Canadian Experience mean exactly?

Hi Benaam,


I have to apologize that I didn't have internet access so I miss your
post. I love the article so much. Thank you very much. Well, I
guess it's gonna to take a while for me to find a job.



[email protected] (benaam) wrote in message news:<[email protected] om>...
    > This
    >
    > http://www.thestar.ca/NASApp/cs/Cont...=1066255810946
    >
    >
    > [email protected] (Oak) wrote in message news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > > To S P Arif Sahari Wibowo, Robert, and Kismit:
    > >
    > >
    > > I really appreciate you guys' opinions which had given me a very good lesson.
    > >
    > >
    > > Take care, my friends!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Oak
 

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