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help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

Old Aug 25th 2003, 4:21 am
  #1  
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Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 31
LadyAri will become famous soon enoughLadyAri will become famous soon enough
Default help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

Hello Everyone,

On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.

Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?

For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner, things like that? or just trips far away from home.

Thank you
LadyAri is offline  
Old Aug 25th 2003, 9:30 am
  #2  
Renee
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

I don't think they're looking for every instance that you went out to dinner
or a movie. But if you went out with friends, or you have proof of going
out to a specific event, it's good to include photos of it, ticket stubs,
and things like that.

In my application, I included copies of ticket stubs from the many NHL
hockey games we attended together along with the mass transit tickets. I
listed some things like a hiking trip that we took with some friends because
I had photos of the four of us together.

When Chris visited me in the U.S. I took him to our favorite NHL team's
practice facility. He met several players and had photos from that. I
included a couple of those. On the same trip, he met my family (mother,
sister, and maternal grandfather), so I included photos of everyone
together. Some photo places show the date on the back of the photo when
it's processed, so that helps show that the date matched the period of a
visit.

You could also include copies of hotel bills if you went on a trip together.
If you had theatre tickets or some other major event, copies of the stubs
can go in the application.

Of course, anyone can have ticket stubs, mass transit passes, and those
types of things, so it's not necessarily proof that you two used them
together. The dates on mine match the time periods of our visits, as can be
seen on the boarding passes we submitted. Just in case, I included photos
from outings when I could do that as well.

Good luck!

Renee

--
Timeline so far:
19 Feb 2003: Moved to Calgary on 6 month TRV
12 May 2003: Did medicals in Calgary
20 June 2003: Applied for TRV extension
5 July 2003: Wedding Date
17 July 2003: CIC received inland spouse PR application
15 Aug 2003: Received 6 month TRV extension
20 Aug 2003: CIC request for work history dates (which were sent with
application)


"LadyAri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Hello Everyone,
    > On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of
    > outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.
    > Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?
    > For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner,
    > things like that? or just trips far away from home.
    > Thank you
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 9:35 am
  #3  
Renee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

Oops...one more thing regarding photos of outings together. I've been
growing my hair out since the beginning of last year, so it's changed a lot
over the course of my relationship with my now-husband.

A CIC officer reviewing those outing and family photos will notice that I
started out with short hair, I had many stages in between, and now it's past
my shoulders. That may be grasping at straws, but it does show the two of
us together over the passage of time.

Hey, anything helps. I guess I could be *really* devious and be wearing six
different wigs, but that would be a lot of trouble when the rest of the
application is totally in order.

Renee

--
Timeline so far:
19 Feb 2003: Moved to Calgary on 6 month TRV
12 May 2003: Did medicals in Calgary
20 June 2003: Applied for TRV extension
5 July 2003: Wedding Date
17 July 2003: CIC received inland spouse PR application
15 Aug 2003: Received 6 month TRV extension
20 Aug 2003: CIC request for work history dates (which were sent with
application)
"LadyAri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Hello Everyone,
    > On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of
    > outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.
    > Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?
    > For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner,
    > things like that? or just trips far away from home.
    > Thank you
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Aug 25th 2003, 12:34 pm
  #4  
Simon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

I didn't include anything like that with my application - it's none of
their business. I seem to recall some really bizarre personal questions
on that form, so I just put a big cross through them... still got PR
okay though



LadyAri wrote:

    > Hello Everyone,
    >
    >
    >
    > On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of
    > outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.
    >
    >
    >
    > Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?
    >
    >
    >
    > For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner,
    > things like that? or just trips far away from home.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thank you
    >
    >
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com


--
For those with nothing better to do: http://littleblog.com/simon
http://www.s80.net ~ simon at s80 dot net
 
Old Aug 26th 2003, 4:57 am
  #5  
Ron Beirnes
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

The purpose of the question is to provide detailed information about
the relationship and how it evolved as the immigration officer has to
make a determination about the bona fides of the relationship and
having been an immigrtion officer for over 20 years if you cross out
the questions and refuse to answer them you can expect in the vast
majority of cases to simply have your application refused for failure
to complete the required application. This is the same situation for
applicants moving from the old act to the new act and they must fill
out the new forms if they did not receive a selection decision by the
required date and if they do not submit the required forms they will
be refused not on points but on their failure to provide a completed
application.
Ron Beirnes
R.B. Global Immigration Consultants Ltd.
825-409 Granville Street.
Vancouver, BC V6C 1T2
Phone (604) 688-3081 fax 688-3015
email [email protected]
Webb page http://www3.telus.net/rbglobal

Simply provide some pictures and evidence over a period of time to
demonstrate the evolution of the relationship.

On Mon, 25 Aug 2003 18:34:29 -0600, Simon
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >I didn't include anything like that with my application - it's none of
    >their business. I seem to recall some really bizarre personal questions
    >on that form, so I just put a big cross through them... still got PR
    >okay though
    >LadyAri wrote:
    >> Hello Everyone,
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of
    >> outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner,
    >> things like that? or just trips far away from home.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Thank you
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Posted via http://britishexpats.com
    >--
    >For those with nothing better to do: http://littleblog.com/simon
    >http://www.s80.net ~ simon at s80 dot net
 
Old Aug 26th 2003, 6:44 am
  #6  
Renee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

To a certain extent, you're right, there are some things that are personal.
But really, we are playing by their rules when we ask to be admitted to
Canada. There are good reasons behind their questions, especially when you
think about all the fraudulent cases.

I included all the information I did because my romantic relationship with
my now-husband originated from an online friendship on a hockey message
board back in August 2001. Our romantic sparks started in March 2002, but
we didn't meet in person until July 5, 2002.

Our relationship is completely legitimate, but the fact remains that it
originated because of an online introduction. The fact that it was not on
a dating site specifically geared to hooking up, and that it happened
unexpectantly thanks to a hockey team's message boards, is really
irrelevant...CIC will still base their evaluation of our relationship on a
variety of factors, including how we met. They specifically ask that
question.

Because we spent a lot of "real time" together during visits as our
relationship evolved (not that our IM and telephone marathons were
meaningless, because they were precious to both of us when that's all we had
that day), we felt that we needed to show the CIC officer reviewing our case
that our relationship was not just based on two people over a computer, but
on two people who may have found their spark there, but who also have a very
cherished relationship that has naturally grown in the "real world."

By sharing our visits, our outings and meetings with friends, and a few of
the things we've done since we began living together in February of this
year, we've established a solid timeline to assure CIC that I am applying
for permanent residency for all the right reasons.

Renee

--
Timeline so far:
19 Feb 2003: Moved to Calgary on 6 month TRV
12 May 2003: Did medicals in Calgary
20 June 2003: Applied for TRV extension
5 July 2003: Wedding Date
17 July 2003: CIC received inland spouse PR application
15 Aug 2003: Received 6 month TRV extension
20 Aug 2003: CIC request for work history dates (which were sent with
application)
21 Aug 2003: CIC received work history reply by overnight post
"Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I didn't include anything like that with my application - it's none of
    > their business. I seem to recall some really bizarre personal questions
    > on that form, so I just put a big cross through them... still got PR
    > okay though
    > LadyAri wrote:
    > > Hello Everyone,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > On this questionnaire, they ask you to describe the types of
    > > outings/trips you and your sponsor have taken.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Does anyone know what exactly they are looking for?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > For instance, do they want to know if you went to the movies, dinner,
    > > things like that? or just trips far away from home.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Thank you
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
    > --
    > For those with nothing better to do: http://littleblog.com/simon
    > http://www.s80.net ~ simon at s80 dot net
 
Old Aug 26th 2003, 7:19 am
  #7  
Simon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

How do any of the following questions prove whether a relationship is
genuine or not?

--
Question: "Describe the circumstances of your first meeting"
(Possible Answer: "Met in a bar, went home, and had sex")

It is absolutely NONE of their business how you met, and it cannot
measure how 'bona-fide' a relationship is. Writing "I prefer not to
disclose this information" should be allowed and is also not good enough
reason to deny an application.

--
Question: "Did your parents attend the ceremony"

What does it matter if they attended the ceremony or not? It's not as
if CIC calls them up to confirm! Whether parents approve of a
relationship is irrelevent.

--
Question: "Was there a honeymoon?"

How does this prove anything? Again, irrelevent.

--
Seriously, I am surprised they don't ask how many times you have had sex!


ron beirnes wrote:

    > The purpose of the question is to provide detailed information about
    > the relationship and how it evolved as the immigration officer has to
    > make a determination about the bona fides of the relationship and
    > having been an immigrtion officer for over 20 years if you cross out
    > the questions and refuse to answer them you can expect in the vast
    > majority of cases to simply have your application refused for failure
    > to complete the required application. This is the same situation for
    > applicants moving from the old act to the new act and they must fill
    > out the new forms if they did not receive a selection decision by the
    > required date and if they do not submit the required forms they will
    > be refused not on points but on their failure to provide a completed
    > application.
    > Ron Beirnes
    > R.B. Global Immigration Consultants Ltd.
    > 825-409 Granville Street.
    > Vancouver, BC V6C 1T2
    > Phone (604) 688-3081 fax 688-3015
    > email [email protected]
    > Webb page http://www3.telus.net/rbglobal
    >
    > Simply provide some pictures and evidence over a period of time to
    > demonstrate the evolution of the relationship.
    >

--
For those with nothing better to do: http://littleblog.com/simon
http://www.s80.net ~ simon at s80 dot net
 
Old Aug 27th 2003, 12:47 am
  #8  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Posts: 35
JnQn is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Get over it.
Another purpose for these, what you term "useless" questions is to be able to cross reference and put a "total" picture together. Remember, people are immigrating from many different countries/situations around the world. Not all applications are legit. Trying to determine if a relationship/marriage is genuine is a difficult process -- remember, they don't know you.

I wouldn't advise people not to answer questions -- may be an ego boost and give you a sense of pride, but I am sure it doesn't do a lot of help for the applications. Guess it depends on how bad you want to get in. Failure to answer could also signal something to hide.
JnQn is offline  
Old Aug 27th 2003, 3:08 am
  #9  
Renee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

"Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

    >How do any of the following questions prove whether a >relationship is
genuine or not?

    >Question: "Describe the circumstances of your first >meeting"
    >(Possible Answer: "Met in a bar, went home, and had >sex")

    > It is absolutely NONE of their business how you met, and it cannot measure
how 'bona-fide' a relationship is. Writing "I prefer not to disclose this
information" should be allowed and is also not good enough reason to deny an
application.


Actually, I respectfully disagree with that one. How do you know that there
aren't people out there whose honest answer to the question would be
something like this....

"We never did meet in person until the day we got married. The applicant is
the friend of my mother's boss who REALLY wants to come to Canada, and my
mom REALLY wants a big promotion, and I don't care about a temporary
marriage of convenience."

Sounds far fetched? There wouldn't be safeguards against marriages of
convenience and people gaining immigration for the wrong reasons if there
weren't so many people who tried it, in Canada as well as other countries.


    > Question: "Did your parents attend the ceremony"
    > What does it matter if they attended the ceremony or not? It's not as if
CIC calls them up to confirm! Whether parents approve of a relationship is
irrelevent.


You're right on one hand. On another, maybe they're trying to see if you
just threw together a quickie wedding or whether you planned the event and
invited people as important as many people's parents are to them.

I'm sure people elope all the time, and I'm sure there are also people who
honestly entered Canada to visit and then decided to tie the knot after they
got here. I'm not sure this question alone would be enough to refuse an
applicant, I think they're just trying to get a picture of how much the
spouse enters into the rest of your life...does he/she know your parents or
not? In some families, if you marry someone your parents don't even know,
that would be considered out of the ordinary.

In my case, both my fiance and I have been estranged from our fathers for
the last ten years or so. We haven't seen or spoken to them, and they are
not in our lives. I put that in the reasoning for their non-attendance.
Chris's mom has passed away, so that went on there too. There's all kinds
of similar things that can apply, and they can't hold that against you.
However, when a family splits over someone's perceived-unacceptable spouse,
and the parents refused to attend the wedding, it might make the CIC wonder
whether it's for a reason that should concern them for the long-term. After
all, even if someone legitimately divorces after a short time, they're still
guarding against people entering Canada by marriage and then getting a
quickie divorce once the PR is done.


    > Question: "Was there a honeymoon?"
    > How does this prove anything? Again, irrelevent.

It's become so much of a tradition, that most people have one. Again, you
probably won't get refused just because you don't have a honeymoon. But it
does show that you celebrated your marriage. *shrugging shoulders* I guess
you could have done that in your own bed and it's still a honeymoon. I
don't think this needs to be on there either, but I didn't mind answering
the question.


    > Seriously, I am surprised they don't ask how many times you have had sex!

*laughing with you* Yeah, I thought that too at the time I was spending
hours on supporting documentation for the whole application. I didn't mind
any of the questions, really...CIC has too much of a backlog and steady
stream of applicants to get any sort of jollies from these questions...they
read them all day long. I did my college internship in a hospital medical
records department, and had access to all kinds of "juicy" psychiatric
files, but it's just part of the job, and you don't pay attention to it
other what you need to accomplish your tasks. CIC is just trying to protect
the interests of the country and make sure that everyone who receives PR
status is going to share that value.

Renee
 
Old Aug 27th 2003, 3:19 am
  #10  
Renee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

*laughing* A thump on the head to me for not proof-reading before hitting
send. I used the word fiance when I should have said husband! I still
occasionally do that since he was my fiance a lot longer than he's been my
spouse.

I swear, we really do adore each other!!

Renee

--
Timeline so far:
19 Feb 2003: Moved to Calgary on 6 month TRV
12 May 2003: Did medicals in Calgary
20 June 2003: Applied for TRV extension
5 July 2003: Wedding Date
17 July 2003: CIC received inland spouse PR application
15 Aug 2003: Received 6 month TRV extension
20 Aug 2003: CIC request for work history dates (which were sent with
application)
21 Aug 2003: CIC received work history reply by overnight post


"Renee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >How do any of the following questions prove whether a >relationship is
    > genuine or not?
    > >Question: "Describe the circumstances of your first >meeting"
    > >(Possible Answer: "Met in a bar, went home, and had >sex")
    > > It is absolutely NONE of their business how you met, and it cannot
measure
    > how 'bona-fide' a relationship is. Writing "I prefer not to disclose this
    > information" should be allowed and is also not good enough reason to deny
an
    > application.
    > Actually, I respectfully disagree with that one. How do you know that
there
    > aren't people out there whose honest answer to the question would be
    > something like this....
    > "We never did meet in person until the day we got married. The applicant
is
    > the friend of my mother's boss who REALLY wants to come to Canada, and my
    > mom REALLY wants a big promotion, and I don't care about a temporary
    > marriage of convenience."
    > Sounds far fetched? There wouldn't be safeguards against marriages of
    > convenience and people gaining immigration for the wrong reasons if there
    > weren't so many people who tried it, in Canada as well as other countries.
    > > Question: "Did your parents attend the ceremony"
    > > What does it matter if they attended the ceremony or not? It's not as
if
    > CIC calls them up to confirm! Whether parents approve of a relationship
is
    > irrelevent.
    > You're right on one hand. On another, maybe they're trying to see if you
    > just threw together a quickie wedding or whether you planned the event and
    > invited people as important as many people's parents are to them.
    > I'm sure people elope all the time, and I'm sure there are also people who
    > honestly entered Canada to visit and then decided to tie the knot after
they
    > got here. I'm not sure this question alone would be enough to refuse an
    > applicant, I think they're just trying to get a picture of how much the
    > spouse enters into the rest of your life...does he/she know your parents
or
    > not? In some families, if you marry someone your parents don't even know,
    > that would be considered out of the ordinary.
    > In my case, both my fiance and I have been estranged from our fathers for
    > the last ten years or so. We haven't seen or spoken to them, and they are
    > not in our lives. I put that in the reasoning for their non-attendance.
    > Chris's mom has passed away, so that went on there too. There's all kinds
    > of similar things that can apply, and they can't hold that against you.
    > However, when a family splits over someone's perceived-unacceptable
spouse,
    > and the parents refused to attend the wedding, it might make the CIC
wonder
    > whether it's for a reason that should concern them for the long-term.
After
    > all, even if someone legitimately divorces after a short time, they're
still
    > guarding against people entering Canada by marriage and then getting a
    > quickie divorce once the PR is done.
    > > Question: "Was there a honeymoon?"
    > > How does this prove anything? Again, irrelevent.
    > It's become so much of a tradition, that most people have one. Again, you
    > probably won't get refused just because you don't have a honeymoon. But
it
    > does show that you celebrated your marriage. *shrugging shoulders* I
guess
    > you could have done that in your own bed and it's still a honeymoon. I
    > don't think this needs to be on there either, but I didn't mind answering
    > the question.
    > > Seriously, I am surprised they don't ask how many times you have had
sex!
    > *laughing with you* Yeah, I thought that too at the time I was spending
    > hours on supporting documentation for the whole application. I didn't
mind
    > any of the questions, really...CIC has too much of a backlog and steady
    > stream of applicants to get any sort of jollies from these
questions...they
    > read them all day long. I did my college internship in a hospital medical
    > records department, and had access to all kinds of "juicy" psychiatric
    > files, but it's just part of the job, and you don't pay attention to it
    > other what you need to accomplish your tasks. CIC is just trying to
protect
    > the interests of the country and make sure that everyone who receives PR
    > status is going to share that value.
    > Renee
 
Old Aug 27th 2003, 5:02 am
  #11  
Forum Regular
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 31
LadyAri will become famous soon enoughLadyAri will become famous soon enough
Default

Thank you all for responding, i have no intention of not answering any questions.
We have been friends for 5yrs and been together for 1 yr now. we also have a 1 month old son, and I really want to get back to him asap, so we can all be together. Just the thought of us being apart for any length of time is hard on both of us.
LadyAri is offline  
Old Aug 27th 2003, 6:44 am
  #12  
Simon
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: help with Spouse/Partner Questionnaire

I agree with pretty much everything you say, but at the end of the day,
whats stopping a immigration officer from discriminating against you
because of something you wrote on the questionnaire - nothing. Just
because you wrote things that the aforesaid officer didn't like, it
doesn't mean that the relationship is any less genuine.

Fortunately, the person who evaluated _my_ questionnaire was decent
enough to realise that it a basic human right for a husband to live with
his wife and blood daughter! Good job I didn't get somebody like Ron

There are alot of people who get married for convenience, but the
government's paranoia makes the process long, tedious and expensive for
the genuine folk like myself and you.

In fact, I'm willing to bet those rogue people who *do* want in Canada
for sake of convenience are still going to get in, no matter how many
forms there are to complete - after all they got married for the wrong
reasons - a questionnaire is going to be a walk in the park.

Citizenship & Immigration Canada is getting alot of bad press at the
moment in the local media, I hope it continues, then maybe some
Canadians will realise just how bad the whole system can be.


Renee wrote:
<snip>



--
For those with nothing better to do: http://littleblog.com/simon
http://www.s80.net ~ simon at s80 dot net
 

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