Got it (my turn now).

Old Oct 8th 2004, 4:45 am
  #1  
Forum Regular
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: US
Posts: 36
lazyant is on a distinguished road
Talking Got it (my turn now).

So yesterday I got this nondescript brown envelope with the requests for our passports.

I just updated my timeline in yogi799.com, but again:

Skilled work class. I'm form Spain, wife's from South America, we got a child and we live in the US.

- Started collecting documentation around 2001. Almost applied in sept 2002 or so when they changed the law and requirements.
- Applied April 2003
- Acknowledgement July 2003
- Initial Assessment late April 2004. Interview waived, asked for updated financial letter and current employer letter.
- Medicals done in April 2003 or early May 2003, sent with rest of documents. In June the medical office called and one of us had to do again one of the medical tests. Results sent in June 2004.
- Final decision received yesterday. So not even 18 months in total.

----

Some comments about my application that may help someone; preparing a good initial application is the best (and only) thing you can do to make the process as fast as possible:

- I thought about the best way to present the documents in order to help the immigration official's task. I settled finally for grouping each section of documents mentioned in the checklist with a paper clip and a copy of the checklist at the front, with the item highlighted. According to their published guidelines (a must read for everyone), the first thing they look at is if you signed the forms and if you paid (maybe I'm forgetting something), so the main forms with the money order attached was the first thing in the envelope.

- As a general strategy, I avoided overkilling with documents that were not explicitly asked for, except for cases were I didn't have a document and I needed a substitute, in this case I would get the closest official thing I could.
For example, a company I worked for dissappeared several years ago, so I couln't get a letter from them, but I got an official paper from the Social Security administration of my country stating the numbers of full-time days I worked. Another case where I included extra documentation was if I found it highly relevant. For example for our education, besides the required transcripts, I sent an evaluation by a Canadian education accreditation organization (WEAS I think).

- I included a one-page presentation letter to briefly mentioned some of the particulars of my case, like the reasons for the extra or non-standard documentation, or to explain the relationship with the Canadian relative (I didn't go as far as to draw a diagram, but I described it so as facilitate the officer's job; things like for instance I have no middle name but I use two last names and the like).
Another thing I mentioned is the fact that in my US state notaries don't notarize documents (or copies), by law they just notarize your signature (I wrote on the copies "true copy" and signed, there are several messages in the board about this issue). The idea is to clarify briefly any point that would make the office stop and think.

- I also included a summarized version of my professional resume in one paper. I wrote Internet links, they look ugly but I think it helps if they are researching your claims to be able to confirm them online.

- I didn't take the ILTS test. There was no test centre nearby and I thought I could make a good case (besides I got plenty of other points, scored maximum in everything except zero for arranged employment and French), so I wrote a letter (as required), just one page, explaining that I've lived and worked in the US for such years, I've published here etc, and I also included some support docs, like my TOEFL test result (got like 98%). By the way, in case anyone wondered, more popular English tests like TOEFL are not chosen by CIC because they don't test the speaking hability.

There are some people that kid themselves by thinking that by studying some French they can boost up to the points they need to pass the mark. Well, if it's not the official French test, the other option is presenting a very strong case and this is close to impossible with claiming just the study or academy hours.

- Finally, in the section about my wife, I also wrote one page tallking about our adaptability and also her English skills as part of them, although at the end I decided no to include non-offical language support documentation for her. Although I didn't do it, a description of your job prospects and search in Canada wouldn't hurt.

- I included all the documents, police certificates etc in the application except for the final transcript of a degree I was about to obtain; I sent this transcript some months later. (I explained this as well in the presentation letter).

- I made a copy of the originals I was including and sent everything in a page size envelope with US post and using the "confirmation" option; they don't have to sign at Buffalo (they won't) but you got a tracking number and you can check online when it was delivered. I think USPS is cheaper in this case than UPS/FedEx.

- When I changed my address I tried faxing the form to the number written in their documents but it doesn't work, I faxed it to the number posted in the Buffalo's consulate web page. (There's another line of message about this in the forum). It worked.

- The e-client never worked for me (said it didn't recognize my data).

----

I think I've explained anything that can be of any value to the rest of applicants. Some other thoughts:

- If you're wondering if you should hire somebody to do the application for you, maybe here's a rule of thumb: do you do your own taxes?

- I'm trying now to open a Canadian bank account from the US (or a branch operating here), but I had no luck so far. I've tried the banks mentioned in:
http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...hreadid=222464

Thanks to all the good people giving their advice and support in this forum.
I'll be around to keep up with landing procedures, moving tips etc.


lazyant
lazyant is offline  
Old Oct 8th 2004, 6:02 am
  #2  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 100
vetal is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Got it (my turn now).

Congrats buddy! happy landing. Would you mind telling us your nationality and the countries you spent more than 6 months?


Originally Posted by lazyant
So yesterday I got this nondescript brown envelope with the requests for our passports.

I just updated my timeline in yogi799.com, but again:

Skilled work class. I'm form Spain, wife's from South America, we got a child and we live in the US.

- Started collecting documentation around 2001. Almost applied in sept 2002 or so when they changed the law and requirements.
- Applied April 2003
- Acknowledgement July 2003
- Initial Assessment late April 2004. Interview waived, asked for updated financial letter and current employer letter.
- Medicals done in April 2003 or early May 2003, sent with rest of documents. In June the medical office called and one of us had to do again one of the medical tests. Results sent in June 2004.
- Final decision received yesterday. So not even 18 months in total.

----

Some comments about my application that may help someone; preparing a good initial application is the best (and only) thing you can do to make the process as fast as possible:

- I thought about the best way to present the documents in order to help the immigration official's task. I settled finally for grouping each section of documents mentioned in the checklist with a paper clip and a copy of the checklist at the front, with the item highlighted. According to their published guidelines (a must read for everyone), the first thing they look at is if you signed the forms and if you paid (maybe I'm forgetting something), so the main forms with the money order attached was the first thing in the envelope.

- As a general strategy, I avoided overkilling with documents that were not explicitly asked for, except for cases were I didn't have a document and I needed a substitute, in this case I would get the closest official thing I could.
For example, a company I worked for dissappeared several years ago, so I couln't get a letter from them, but I got an official paper from the Social Security administration of my country stating the numbers of full-time days I worked. Another case where I included extra documentation was if I found it highly relevant. For example for our education, besides the required transcripts, I sent an evaluation by a Canadian education accreditation organization (WEAS I think).

- I included a one-page presentation letter to briefly mentioned some of the particulars of my case, like the reasons for the extra or non-standard documentation, or to explain the relationship with the Canadian relative (I didn't go as far as to draw a diagram, but I described it so as facilitate the officer's job; things like for instance I have no middle name but I use two last names and the like).
Another thing I mentioned is the fact that in my US state notaries don't notarize documents (or copies), by law they just notarize your signature (I wrote on the copies "true copy" and signed, there are several messages in the board about this issue). The idea is to clarify briefly any point that would make the office stop and think.

- I also included a summarized version of my professional resume in one paper. I wrote Internet links, they look ugly but I think it helps if they are researching your claims to be able to confirm them online.

- I didn't take the ILTS test. There was no test centre nearby and I thought I could make a good case (besides I got plenty of other points, scored maximum in everything except zero for arranged employment and French), so I wrote a letter (as required), just one page, explaining that I've lived and worked in the US for such years, I've published here etc, and I also included some support docs, like my TOEFL test result (got like 98%). By the way, in case anyone wondered, more popular English tests like TOEFL are not chosen by CIC because they don't test the speaking hability.

There are some people that kid themselves by thinking that by studying some French they can boost up to the points they need to pass the mark. Well, if it's not the official French test, the other option is presenting a very strong case and this is close to impossible with claiming just the study or academy hours.

- Finally, in the section about my wife, I also wrote one page tallking about our adaptability and also her English skills as part of them, although at the end I decided no to include non-offical language support documentation for her. Although I didn't do it, a description of your job prospects and search in Canada wouldn't hurt.

- I included all the documents, police certificates etc in the application except for the final transcript of a degree I was about to obtain; I sent this transcript some months later. (I explained this as well in the presentation letter).

- I made a copy of the originals I was including and sent everything in a page size envelope with US post and using the "confirmation" option; they don't have to sign at Buffalo (they won't) but you got a tracking number and you can check online when it was delivered. I think USPS is cheaper in this case than UPS/FedEx.

- When I changed my address I tried faxing the form to the number written in their documents but it doesn't work, I faxed it to the number posted in the Buffalo's consulate web page. (There's another line of message about this in the forum). It worked.

- The e-client never worked for me (said it didn't recognize my data).

----

I think I've explained anything that can be of any value to the rest of applicants. Some other thoughts:

- If you're wondering if you should hire somebody to do the application for you, maybe here's a rule of thumb: do you do your own taxes?

- I'm trying now to open a Canadian bank account from the US (or a branch operating here), but I had no luck so far. I've tried the banks mentioned in:
http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...hreadid=222464

Thanks to all the good people giving their advice and support in this forum.
I'll be around to keep up with landing procedures, moving tips etc.


lazyant
vetal is offline  
Old Oct 8th 2004, 6:02 am
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 159
nervous_wreck is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Got it (my turn now).

Congratulations lazyant on a job well done. Also, thanks for the very useful pointers as outlined in your post.
Have a happy landing
nervous_wreck is offline  
Old Oct 8th 2004, 6:23 am
  #4  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 48
Siona is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Got it (my turn now).

Congratulations! It must be a great feeling!
Siona is offline  
Old Oct 8th 2004, 6:42 am
  #5  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Kanata, Ontario
Posts: 40
scot is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Got it (my turn now).

Congratulations. It must feel great

I am almost the same timeframe as you so hopefully I will here something soon.

Originally Posted by lazyant
So yesterday I got this nondescript brown envelope with the requests for our passports.

I just updated my timeline in yogi799.com, but again:

Skilled work class. I'm form Spain, wife's from South America, we got a child and we live in the US.

- Started collecting documentation around 2001. Almost applied in sept 2002 or so when they changed the law and requirements.
- Applied April 2003
- Acknowledgement July 2003
- Initial Assessment late April 2004. Interview waived, asked for updated financial letter and current employer letter.
- Medicals done in April 2003 or early May 2003, sent with rest of documents. In June the medical office called and one of us had to do again one of the medical tests. Results sent in June 2004.
- Final decision received yesterday. So not even 18 months in total.

----

Some comments about my application that may help someone; preparing a good initial application is the best (and only) thing you can do to make the process as fast as possible:

- I thought about the best way to present the documents in order to help the immigration official's task. I settled finally for grouping each section of documents mentioned in the checklist with a paper clip and a copy of the checklist at the front, with the item highlighted. According to their published guidelines (a must read for everyone), the first thing they look at is if you signed the forms and if you paid (maybe I'm forgetting something), so the main forms with the money order attached was the first thing in the envelope.

- As a general strategy, I avoided overkilling with documents that were not explicitly asked for, except for cases were I didn't have a document and I needed a substitute, in this case I would get the closest official thing I could.
For example, a company I worked for dissappeared several years ago, so I couln't get a letter from them, but I got an official paper from the Social Security administration of my country stating the numbers of full-time days I worked. Another case where I included extra documentation was if I found it highly relevant. For example for our education, besides the required transcripts, I sent an evaluation by a Canadian education accreditation organization (WEAS I think).

- I included a one-page presentation letter to briefly mentioned some of the particulars of my case, like the reasons for the extra or non-standard documentation, or to explain the relationship with the Canadian relative (I didn't go as far as to draw a diagram, but I described it so as facilitate the officer's job; things like for instance I have no middle name but I use two last names and the like).
Another thing I mentioned is the fact that in my US state notaries don't notarize documents (or copies), by law they just notarize your signature (I wrote on the copies "true copy" and signed, there are several messages in the board about this issue). The idea is to clarify briefly any point that would make the office stop and think.

- I also included a summarized version of my professional resume in one paper. I wrote Internet links, they look ugly but I think it helps if they are researching your claims to be able to confirm them online.

- I didn't take the ILTS test. There was no test centre nearby and I thought I could make a good case (besides I got plenty of other points, scored maximum in everything except zero for arranged employment and French), so I wrote a letter (as required), just one page, explaining that I've lived and worked in the US for such years, I've published here etc, and I also included some support docs, like my TOEFL test result (got like 98%). By the way, in case anyone wondered, more popular English tests like TOEFL are not chosen by CIC because they don't test the speaking hability.

There are some people that kid themselves by thinking that by studying some French they can boost up to the points they need to pass the mark. Well, if it's not the official French test, the other option is presenting a very strong case and this is close to impossible with claiming just the study or academy hours.

- Finally, in the section about my wife, I also wrote one page tallking about our adaptability and also her English skills as part of them, although at the end I decided no to include non-offical language support documentation for her. Although I didn't do it, a description of your job prospects and search in Canada wouldn't hurt.

- I included all the documents, police certificates etc in the application except for the final transcript of a degree I was about to obtain; I sent this transcript some months later. (I explained this as well in the presentation letter).

- I made a copy of the originals I was including and sent everything in a page size envelope with US post and using the "confirmation" option; they don't have to sign at Buffalo (they won't) but you got a tracking number and you can check online when it was delivered. I think USPS is cheaper in this case than UPS/FedEx.

- When I changed my address I tried faxing the form to the number written in their documents but it doesn't work, I faxed it to the number posted in the Buffalo's consulate web page. (There's another line of message about this in the forum). It worked.

- The e-client never worked for me (said it didn't recognize my data).

----

I think I've explained anything that can be of any value to the rest of applicants. Some other thoughts:

- If you're wondering if you should hire somebody to do the application for you, maybe here's a rule of thumb: do you do your own taxes?

- I'm trying now to open a Canadian bank account from the US (or a branch operating here), but I had no luck so far. I've tried the banks mentioned in:
http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...hreadid=222464

Thanks to all the good people giving their advice and support in this forum.
I'll be around to keep up with landing procedures, moving tips etc.


lazyant
scot is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.