Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Old Feb 21st 2019, 9:05 am
  #16  
 
BritInParis's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Not in Paris
Posts: 16,705
BritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond reputeBritInParis has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Originally Posted by Bingbing25 View Post
My point of raising the issue of legitimacy was that it'd be unfair if people who have resided in the UK legally for 5, 10, or 20 years and now are deemed eligible to receive that status as permanent resident or citizen face significant difficulties due to very high fees. In fact, some people already are struggling at £2,300. At the point where one has established one's life in the country and has nowhere really to go back, to tell them 'if the process seems unfair, you are free to choose to not to undertake it' seems a little harsh.
Five years maybe, not ten or twenty.
BritInParis is offline  
Old Feb 21st 2019, 9:10 am
  #17  
Forum Regular
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 127
Bingbing25 will become famous soon enoughBingbing25 will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Originally Posted by BritInParis View Post
It was a Coalition government policy objective to make the Home Office fully self-funded by 2019/2020 hence the huge rise in fees over the past ten or so years. With the last round of minor fee increases it appears they have now achieved this goal. We’ll see what happens in April.
I see, thanks for the information.
Bingbing25 is offline  
Old Feb 21st 2019, 9:37 am
  #18  
BE Forum Addict
 
michali's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,221
michali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond reputemichali has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
It's not a NHS surcharge, NHS is the National Health Service. It's the IHS, International Health Surcharge.
Nor is it 'ridiculously overpriced'. £400 per year for full healthcare is a bargain in anyone's book.
I totally agree with you!
michali is offline  
Old Feb 21st 2019, 9:55 am
  #19  
Forum Regular
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 127
Bingbing25 will become famous soon enoughBingbing25 will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

I agree that £400 per year for full healthcare is indeed a bargain. When I was a student in Canada, I paid 650CAD per year, so about the same, and it was considered generally a very good deal. However, those who hold work visas or work on family visas are effectively paying much more than that.
Bingbing25 is offline  
Old Feb 21st 2019, 10:04 am
  #20  
Prisoner of Her Majesty
 
Pollyana's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: Keep true friends and puppets close, trust no-one else...
Posts: 92,797
Pollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond reputePollyana has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Originally Posted by Bingbing25 View Post
My point of raising the issue of legitimacy was that it'd be unfair if people who have resided in the UK legally for 5, 10, or 20 years and now are deemed eligible to receive that status as permanent resident or citizen face significant difficulties due to very high fees. In fact, some people already are struggling at £2,300. At the point where one has established one's life in the country and has nowhere really to go back, to tell them 'if the process seems unfair, you are free to choose to not to undertake it' seems a little harsh.
Not really. Its no different in any other western nation.
Its a common theme in Australian immigration forums, for example, where many people arrive on temporary visas and manage to convince themselves that they will be able to stay for life. They fail to acknowledge that a temporary visa is just that, temporary, and the chances of gaining permanent residency are not always that good. People can find out after 5, 10, 15 years in Aus that they cannot extend their temporary status any longer and they need to leave. Harsh, but fair. The same applies to the next step, gaining citizenship. It is not a right, its a privilege, and if one fails to meet the requirements, financial or otherwise, after weeks, months or years, then one has to leave. Simple as that.
Pollyana is offline  
Old Feb 21st 2019, 12:55 pm
  #21  
Forum Regular
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 127
Bingbing25 will become famous soon enoughBingbing25 will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Your prognosis on future settlement fees?

Originally Posted by Pollyana View Post
Not really. Its no different in any other western nation.
Its a common theme in Australian immigration forums, for example, where many people arrive on temporary visas and manage to convince themselves that they will be able to stay for life. They fail to acknowledge that a temporary visa is just that, temporary, and the chances of gaining permanent residency are not always that good. People can find out after 5, 10, 15 years in Aus that they cannot extend their temporary status any longer and they need to leave. Harsh, but fair. The same applies to the next step, gaining citizenship. It is not a right, its a privilege, and if one fails to meet the requirements, financial or otherwise, after weeks, months or years, then one has to leave. Simple as that.
I think one must consider the difference between temporary visas and settlement visas. The latter is given on the assumption that the applicant is entering the country in view of settling and establishing life there. And their 'rights' to do so, as long as they are not burdens to taxpayers (and sometimes even when they are), are recognised under article 8 of ECHR on family life. So it's more correct to view the 5-year period as a provisional period rather than a temporary stay.

I would be more inclined to agree with you if we're only looking at work or study visas, where the idea is that the immigrant's stay in the country is tied to his or her employment or studies there. In this case, it is indeed expected of them to return home when the employment or studies ceases. Receiving indefinite stay after 10 years would be closer to a privilege in this case. But even then, there is some recognition of their rights to private life. If there was no recognition of such rights, settlement would be permissible only when their continuing stay in the country was deemed extremely beneficial to it.

I disagree with your statement that Western nations consider it entirely a privilege to be able to stay in a country indefinitely. The EU states unequivocally that you as well as your family members acquire the right of permanent residence in an EU nation after 5 years of lawful residence. Also a number of Western countries (Canada, the US, Ireland, etc.) have a shorter or no provisional period before one becomes a permanent resident of the country as a family member of a citizen. It is possible that such measures are in place, not because these countries respect the rights to family life, but because doing so is beneficial to them. But I don't believe any of them claim this. So I am inclined to believe that there is minimal recognition of such rights.

All in all, immigration is neither fully a privilege nor a right. It is of course a privilege to be eligible for residence in a foreign country. You then have access to more economic, cultural, and social resources than were you only allowed to stay in your home country. However, various official legal sources show that there is also recognition of rights to family life and private life by Western nations. Therefore it's more correct to view the restrictions on who may become permanent residents/citizens after a certain period as justified not because this is entirely a privilege, but because the rights of to-be citizens may conflict with the rights of those who are already citizens.

Last edited by Bingbing25; Feb 21st 2019 at 12:59 pm.
Bingbing25 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.