Forefeit of Irish Citizenship?

Old Sep 16th 2002, 8:47 pm
  #1  
Ceestand
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Posts: n/a
Default Forefeit of Irish Citizenship?

I am currently residing in the United States, a resident alien for
over 20 years. I have dual citizenship with Australia and Ireland. I
plan on getting naturalized in the U.S. I understand that the
Australians will boot me for getting naturalized here, that's fine.
However, I want to preserve my Irish citizenship. I know that in the
loyalty oath to the US I swear away my alliegience to all foreign
states, powers, etc... What exactly does that mean? I believe Ireland
will see me as an Irish citizen and the US will see me as an American
citizen. How do all other countries "see" me? As however I present
myself? Would I be able to present my Irish passport to customs in
Europe and enter back into the US on my American passport in the same
trip? How about entering the US on an Irish passport or entering
Ireland on a US passport?
 
Old Sep 16th 2002, 9:29 pm
  #2  
Jaj
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Default Re: Forefeit of Irish Citizenship?

Ireland will not take away your Irish citizenship if you become an
American, no matter what you say to the US authorities.

Since 4 April 2002, Australia will also let you keep your citizenship.
http://www.citizenship.gov.au

You will need to:
- always show a US passport to US officials on entering and leaving
the US
- always show an Australian passport to Australian officials on
entering and leaving Australia
- For Ireland (or anywhere else in the EU/EEA), you could use either
an Australian or American passport if you wished, however if you were
planning to stay for a long time or work, then you should use an Irish
passport.
- If you were planning to work in New Zealand you should show an
Australian passport.

Overseas, you can use whatever passport you like. It is advisable to
always use the same passport to exist a country as the one you used to
enter it on the same trip.

Jeremy



    >On 16 Sep 2002 13:47:08 -0700, [email protected] (ceestand) wrote:
    >I am currently residing in the United States, a resident alien for
    >over 20 years. I have dual citizenship with Australia and Ireland. I
    >plan on getting naturalized in the U.S. I understand that the
    >Australians will boot me for getting naturalized here, that's fine.
    >However, I want to preserve my Irish citizenship. I know that in the
    >loyalty oath to the US I swear away my alliegience to all foreign
    >states, powers, etc... What exactly does that mean? I believe Ireland
    >will see me as an Irish citizen and the US will see me as an American
    >citizen. How do all other countries "see" me? As however I present
    >myself? Would I be able to present my Irish passport to customs in
    >Europe and enter back into the US on my American passport in the same
    >trip? How about entering the US on an Irish passport or entering
    >Ireland on a US passport?
 
Old Sep 17th 2002, 2:04 am
  #3  
Stephen C. Gallagher
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Forefeit of Irish Citizenship?

    > I am currently residing in the United States, a resident alien for
    > over 20 years. I have dual citizenship with Australia and Ireland. I
    > plan on getting naturalized in the U.S. I understand that the
    > Australians will boot me for getting naturalized here,

Not anymore. Australia changed their nationality law earlier
this year, and you will no longer lose your Australian citizenship
by applying for and taking any other citizenship.

    > However, I want to preserve my Irish citizenship. I know that in the
    > loyalty oath to the US I swear away my alliegience to all foreign
    > states, powers, etc... What exactly does that mean?

As far as Ireland is concerned it has no effect to
your Irish citizenship. They do not view a renunciatory
statement made to "non-Irish" officials as having any
effect under Irish law.

What it means to you, is up to you.

    > I believe Ireland
    > will see me as an Irish citizen and the US will see me as an American
    > citizen.

True. Both Ireland the the US will see you as being one of
their citizens. Neither country will say that you are not
a citizen of any other country. Whether other countries view you as
being one of their citizens is immaterial.

    > How do all other countries "see" me? As however I present
    > myself?

Yes, pretty much. Since you would legally hold both
citizenships you could present yourself either way.

    > Would I be able to present my Irish passport to customs in
    > Europe and enter back into the US on my American passport in the same
    > trip?

Yes, absolutely. In fact, the US would require you to reenter the
US on your US passport.

    > How about entering the US on an Irish passport

That's not allowed. US law requires a US citizen to enter
the US using a US passport, even if he is also entitled to
hold a foreign passport.

    > or entering Ireland on a US passport?

I don't think that Ireland has a restriction on an Irish
citizen entering on a non-Irish passport, although
you will cause delays at the port of entry if you tell
them that you plan on doing something that you
would not entitled to do as a non-Irish citizen.

This doesn't mean that if you were an Irish citizen
and you entered Ireland on a non-Irish (or non EU)
passport, that you wouldn't be allowed to work there
if you were admitted as just a visitor. You would be
allowed to do so once admitted. But if you told
the immigration inspector that you planned to work,
but you only had a US passport, he might refuse to
admit you without proof that you were entitled to work
in Ireland.

Stephen Gallagher
 

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