'Dual' citizenship

Old Mar 11th 2018, 9:51 pm
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Default 'Dual' citizenship

Hello,

Sorry if this in in the wrong section.

Originally, we had the plan of me moving to America using the fiance route next year (submitting the i-129f within the next month) and for me to then look into the idea of university in the states.

After a lot of research, it seems that going to a UK university is 'easier' and quicker compared to America. We're toying with the idea of my partner moving to England once out of the Air Force (start of next year) and living here until I complete my degree, and then apply to go to the states.

I've not fully researched into moving into the UK as of yet however I saw this on the gov website:

"You and your partner must intend to live together permanently in the UK after you apply."

Has anyone ever been in this situation where they've lived in the UK with their partner, and then moved over to the US? I did see a couple on Youtube that originally lived in the UK for around 3 years, and then moved over to the US. (Although as soon as the UK partner's conditional green card expired, they broke up).

I also assume that when moving over to the US from the UK through the spouse or fiance visa, you don't give up your British citizenship?

Thanks
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Old Mar 11th 2018, 10:26 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Your plan is perfectly workable providing you meet the requirements. Once married your partner could spend 33 months in the UK on a spouse visa and just return to the US when it expires. I don’t really understand your second question - why would holding a US visa mean giving up your British citizenship?
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Old Mar 11th 2018, 10:49 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Lifer View Post
Hello,

Sorry if this in in the wrong section.

Originally, we had the plan of me moving to America using the fiance route next year (submitting the i-129f within the next month) and for me to then look into the idea of university in the states.

After a lot of research, it seems that going to a UK university is 'easier' and quicker compared to America. We're toying with the idea of my partner moving to England once out of the Air Force (start of next year) and living here until I complete my degree, and then apply to go to the states.

I've not fully researched into moving into the UK as of yet however I saw this on the gov website:

"You and your partner must intend to live together permanently in the UK after you apply."

Has anyone ever been in this situation where they've lived in the UK with their partner, and then moved over to the US? I did see a couple on Youtube that originally lived in the UK for around 3 years, and then moved over to the US. (Although as soon as the UK partner's conditional green card expired, they broke up).

I also assume that when moving over to the US from the UK through the spouse or fiance visa, you don't give up your British citizenship?

Thanks
You would initially move to the US on a spouse visa or fiancée visa, become a permanent resident, then after three years of residing in the US you are eligible to apply for US citizenship—if you want to. This application will have zero effect on your UK citizenship.
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Old Mar 11th 2018, 11:03 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

How do you propose to get a UK visa for your partner ? Are you aware of the financial requirements ?
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Old Mar 11th 2018, 11:47 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

I think you're confusing visas, residency and citizenship.
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 1:21 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Nutmegger View Post
then after three years of residing in the US you are eligible to apply for US citizenship—if you want to.
Assuming they are still married to each other.
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 2:27 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Twinkle0927 View Post
Assuming they are still married to each other.
And if not, he can do it in 5 years.
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 3:56 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

If you want to take it literally then I assume the requirement means you need to live forever.
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 7:38 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Lifer View Post
Hello,

Sorry if this in in the wrong section.

Originally, we had the plan of me moving to America using the fiance route next year (submitting the i-129f within the next month) and for me to then look into the idea of university in the states.

After a lot of research, it seems that going to a UK university is 'easier' and quicker compared to America. We're toying with the idea of my partner moving to England once out of the Air Force (start of next year) and living here until I complete my degree, and then apply to go to the states.

I've not fully researched into moving into the UK as of yet however I saw this on the gov website:

"You and your partner must intend to live together permanently in the UK after you apply."

Has anyone ever been in this situation where they've lived in the UK with their partner, and then moved over to the US? I did see a couple on Youtube that originally lived in the UK for around 3 years, and then moved over to the US. (Although as soon as the UK partner's conditional green card expired, they broke up).

I also assume that when moving over to the US from the UK through the spouse or fiance visa, you don't give up your British citizenship?

Thanks
As you are enquiring about your partner living in the UK...I’ve moved your thread over to our UK Immigration forum.

Should you have any questions about moving to the US please post them in the following forum...

Marriage Based Visas - British Expats
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 9:46 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Yes I'm aware of the financial requirements (£18,600 income?)

I'm not married yet, but we are intending to marry. I'm trying to figure out whether it's better to marry first, and then apply for a visa or use a fiance visa etc.

Although it sounds like getting a US visa (K1) for myself is easier than getting a UK visa for my partner.
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Old Mar 12th 2018, 9:48 am
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

You marrying in the US on the VWP and then your wife applying for a UK spouse visa from the US is the easiest way of doing it in terms of paperwork and fees.
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 3:39 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Lifer View Post
Yes I'm aware of the financial requirements (£18,600 income?)

I'm not married yet, but we are intending to marry. I'm trying to figure out whether it's better to marry first, and then apply for a visa or use a fiance visa etc.

Although it sounds like getting a US visa (K1) for myself is easier than getting a UK visa for my partner.
Unlike the UK where your USC fiancée requires a fiancée visa in order to marry and I believe there are other criteria as well, you can fly into the US, get married that same day and have an 80 day honeymoon and fly back to the UK.

You can then file for your then spouse's UK spousal visa immediately after the marriage when you have the paperwork completed, etc.
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 3:41 pm
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Default Re: 'Dual' citizenship

Originally Posted by Rete View Post
Unlike the UK where your USC fiancée requires a fiancée visa in order to marry and I believe there are other criteria as well, you can fly into the US, get married that same day and have an 80 day honeymoon and fly back to the UK.

You can then file for your then spouse's UK spousal visa immediately after the marriage when you have the paperwork completed, etc.
Slight correction - a fiancée visa isn't required to marry but it is required to marry and then be able to apply for Leave to Remain. Your overall point stands however as the OP's fiancée would need a Marriage Visitor visa to marry in the UK even if she returned to the US to apply for her spouse visa and therefore it is easier to marry in the US.
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