Crime in the Caribbean

Old May 23rd 2018, 10:58 pm
  #16  
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Yes, let's not kid ourselves, very few places here are 100% safe. This from today's DM:
British man dies of machete wounds in St Lucia | Daily Mail Online
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Old May 24th 2018, 6:37 am
  #17  
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Yes, people getting chopped by machete [cutlass is the local word] is the thing that usually happens in rum shop disputes, no guns you see...

Amusingly, some locals often keep a cutlass under the bed, just in case, i was once asked if i did, i had to say ‘no, but honestly there is a chainsaw’ :-) Actually, most people have military grade weedeaters in the house, 6 ft long, i think they make the ultimate defensive weapon should it be needed.

Because we all want cool breezes and dont want to invite a sneak thief, goats or mozzies into the house no matter how unlikely, most people have screens and bars on the open doors/windows.
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Old May 24th 2018, 4:16 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Originally Posted by uk_grenada View Post
Amusingly, some locals often keep a cutlass under the bed, just in case, i was once asked if i did, i had to say ‘no, but honestly there is a chainsaw’ :-)
Because we all want cool breezes and don't want to invite a sneak thief, goats or mozzies into the house no matter how unlikely, most people have screens and bars on the open doors/windows.

I've always argued against keeping a cutlass beside or under the bed. Anybody who breaks into my house is almost certain to be stronger than my wife or me, so would easily disarm us and use the weapon against us. Let him bring his own damn cutlass!

When we first came to Cayman 40 years ago there was virtually no crime. But it gradually grew, and we promised ourselves that when it got bad enough for us to need burglar-bars, we'd leave. But when it did, we didn't. Now, there are even occasional home-invasions, which is a scary thought - but they're generally restricted to homes where there's known to be money, and one glance inside our place would disabuse any burglar of that notion. He'd be more likely to leave us a few dollars out of his own pocket!
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Old May 24th 2018, 4:26 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

While theres almost no crime here, the police actually encourage ‘good people’ to own guns. I have several close friends who do, but i cant see the point unless we have a hurricane. I understand that for a while it gets a bit lawless, and those known to be armed are less likely to be in bother.

My chainsaws a random thing - though i imagine the noise [do i have to buy a ski mask?] would discourage :-)

I know the MD of a security/cash handling co, he is disarming his guys in favour of tasers and big sticks, sounds sensible.

A friend heard someone breaking into his shed - he fired his shotgun at it and got a phone call from his gardener who was trying to steal his lawnmower ‘boss is me you shoot, i need de hospital’ so he called the police and after the gardener did his 6 months - he re-employed him, the gardener saying he took his licks and learned, no issues...
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Old May 24th 2018, 4:28 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

l do think burglar bars make some sense, it means nobodys going to sneak up on you, though i cant imagine a local trying, they are too honest and nice generally, and any bad guys going to get quickly shopped.
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Old May 25th 2018, 2:20 am
  #21  
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

I wonder to what degree piracy will affect tourism in these parts. It's a scary prospect!

LONDON, May 23 (Reuters) - Pirate attacks around South American and Caribbean waters are growing, and violence is increasingly used during robberies committed on vessels at anchor, a report showed on Wednesday.

The Oceans Beyond Piracy (OBP) non-profit group recorded 71 incidents in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2017, a 163 percent increase over 2016. OBP said the majority of the attacks occurred in territorial waters, with around 59 percent of incidents involving robbery on yachts. Anchorages in Venezuela, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Colombia and St. Lucia were the regional hot spots during 2017, it said. "We have observed a significant increase in violent incidents and anchorage crime, particularly in the anchorages of Venezuela and the recent violent incidents off Suriname in the first part of this year," said the report's lead author Maisie Pigeon.

In late April a pirate attack off the coast of Suriname left at least a dozen fishermen from neighbouring Guyana missing and feared dead with three separate bodies found in what was described by Guyana's President David Granger as a "massacre". In a separate incident in May a fishing boat captain was shot dead after his vessel was attacked off Suriname while the rest of the crew survived.

OBP could not give a total economic cost for attacks in Latin America and the Caribbean, but said ship stores and crew belongings reported stolen were estimated to have totaled nearly $1 million in 2017.

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Old May 25th 2018, 6:25 am
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Haven’t heard about it locally really. Some floating boats and gin palaces left in a bay for the summer have been broken into, but that was a couple of local chancers, who were caught, and that’s burglary not piracy imho.

I think its it’s pretty easy for the police to sit by a bay and spot people attacking boats esp since trump gave them night vision kit. The police have lots of nice fast boats donated by drug runners.

Real piracy, of fishing boats? I’m guessing there’s a link with the drugs trade, smuggling is also alive and well. These are more concerning I think as a change as it’s locals on locals and just indicates an increase in violence, but that means a high probability they will be shopped if they don’t pay for privacy.
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Old May 25th 2018, 6:04 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Originally Posted by uk_grenada View Post
Real piracy, of fishing boats? I’m guessing there’s a link with the drugs trade, smuggling is also alive and well.
Yes, good point. There is a flourishing traffic in drugs from Jamaica to Cayman - mainly ganja, but not only.
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Old Jun 15th 2018, 12:04 am
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On the general topic of crime, let's not forget the corruption that seems to be endemic in our region. We have a Commission for Standards in Public Life, formed four years ago but which has been dormant ever since - and by the looks of things may be dormant for the next four years too. Sigh. You wonder why the politicians bother creating bodies that they don't intend to function! I don't even know if anybody has been appointed to our useless Commission. I couldn't find any Members' names when I checked online. I'm sure Cayman isn't the only place that avoids holding public servants and political appointees accountable for their actions. Can we hear from some of the other Caribbean territories?
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Old Jun 15th 2018, 3:42 am
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Is it a tick box or me too move? There is such a thing here plus laws on standards for public servants, but I don’t think it’s needed, they also don’t appear to do anything, because there’s no corruption in public life - of course....

Comes down to the independence of the judiciary. Till a judge is told of corruption and hauls a politician into court I won’t believe it.
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Old Jun 15th 2018, 7:52 am
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
On the general topic of crime, let's not forget the corruption that seems to be endemic in our region. We have a Commission for Standards in Public Life, formed four years ago but which has been dormant ever since - and by the looks of things may be dormant for the next four years too. Sigh. You wonder why the politicians bother creating bodies that they don't intend to function! I don't even know if anybody has been appointed to our useless Commission. I couldn't find any Members' names when I checked online. I'm sure Cayman isn't the only place that avoids holding public servants and political appointees accountable for their actions. Can we hear from some of the other Caribbean territories?
As I recall, this thread is an enlightenment for the uninformed regarding crime in the Caribbean.

When in the Caribbean, I used to worry incessantly about the levels of corruption in the police and in public office. After all, seemingly most political candidates don't typically run for any other reason than to participate in the ruling party's access to the keys to the cookie jar. It's simply a tribal thing and nothing to do with politics or even policies. Smart people go and find a good real job in tax havens and those that are left might choose to run for office for want of anything better.

HOWEVER, now in the big bad larger world we can all witness levels of corruption and even treasonous behaviour at the highest levels for which people would have been executed or given life sentences not so long ago. So give the Caribbean a break! You want to check the level of police perversion of the course of justice here in the UK? Cover-ups and politicians serving only the rich and at their beck and call in the US? The handling of the run-up to the Brexit referendum and the US election? Appalling polarizing media on both sides of the Atlantic in cahoots with the political parties. There are bigger fish to fry. The Caribbean's biggest problem now (for the last twenty years) is geographical and not just due to hurricanes. It's stuck in the trafficking lanes from the hard drug producers and locals need the 'business' when their cash crops such as bananas become near worthless. Sadly, the brain drain has always been there and opportunities outside of low-paid anti-social hours in tourism are now few and far between for the average Joe, particularly when governments squabble over how to deliver a half-decent public education system which would at least START to provide opportunities for the locals to participate in rewarding entry-level positions in the local international business job market.

Last edited by Pistolpete2; Jun 15th 2018 at 8:24 am. Reason: As I recall, this thread is an enlightenment for the uninformed regarding crime in the Caribbean.
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Old Jun 15th 2018, 11:07 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

You're right of course, Pete. The Caribbean problem is that in small communities everybody lives cheek by jowl with corrupt individuals. And the latter have re-defined "corruption". Last year our newspaper's editor left the Island hastily and in fear, for simply grumbling that corruption was rampant here. (I don't think he used the word "rampant", but that was implicit in his editorial.) Some of our politicians protested that he had been disloyal and indeed treasonous, and that there was virtually no corruption at all. The fact is that what the rest of us call "crony corruption" is not considered dishonest; unless large sums of money are slipped under doors in brown envelopes, it's not really corruption.
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Old Jun 16th 2018, 6:58 am
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
You're right of course, Pete. The Caribbean problem is that in small communities everybody lives cheek by jowl with corrupt individuals. And the latter have re-defined "corruption". Last year our newspaper's editor left the Island hastily and in fear, for simply grumbling that corruption was rampant here. (I don't think he used the word "rampant", but that was implicit in his editorial.) Some of our politicians protested that he had been disloyal and indeed treasonous, and that there was virtually no corruption at all. The fact is that what the rest of us call "crony corruption" is not considered dishonest; unless large sums of money are slipped under doors in brown envelopes, it's not really corruption.
I will restate that things can be very tribal. This is specifically how I saw the political side of things. In the run-up to an election there are parties 'funded' by the candidates - beer, rum, girls... Then the roads miraculously get fixed. Post-election there are debts to be paid but the losers could be near bankruptcy. To the victor go the spoils so they then, as I said, get the keys and there are public works contracts available for the BIG brown envelopes. The winners could even get their senior civil servants as Permanent Secretaries (as a reward for political loyalty) while the previous ones (if on the losing side) sit in some back office twiddling their thumbs. The constituencies or specific voter districts that voted the Government in get rewarded with improvement projects and certain picked individuals get jobs. Public works contracts aren't subject to an open process for bidding and grant of contracts and there's no proper control over politicians having offshore bank accounts.That's the way it has always been and comes as no surprise so the masses don't regard it as corrupt. So you vote with this whole process in mind.

I will say that in Bermuda, they have just gone through a process of examining the proceedings of a former administration with a view to finding serious corruption. In St Lucia, the current administration is seemingly in the process of 'sticking' the findings of a corruption review carried out about ten years ago to a previous administration - trying to cast them once and for all into the wilderness. Of course it's all political posturing. One even hears politicians say as much as "Well we admit we are corrupt, but the other lot are more corrupt" so who cares? Clearly the electorate don't. And If race is involved, it is simply a matter of scores being settled.

Last edited by Pistolpete2; Jun 16th 2018 at 8:57 am. Reason: So you vote with this whole process in mind.
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Old Jun 19th 2018, 2:15 am
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

Originally Posted by Pistolpete2 View Post
... If race is involved, it is simply a matter of scores being settled.
Yes, a common Caribbean problem. Cayman is unusual in that "race" in the normal usage of the word is not a problem, but our community is rife with ethnic prejudices, in various degrees. Two thirds of our town-size population are foreign-born - migrants and immigrants brought in to augment the local workforce - and they originate in a few dozen foreign nations scattered around the world, and speak (between them) probably thirty or forty different languages, plus dialects.

The foreigners are generally resented by the bloodlineCaymanians. "Mixed marriages" here are those between foreigners and bloodline Caymanians: nothing to do with race or colour. Caymanians have a monopoly on political offices. Foreigners are forbidden from standing for election, and in practice only a very few of us are allowed "inside the wagons" where government appointments are made. Thus, and thence, crony-corruption.
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Old Jul 14th 2018, 5:23 pm
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Default Re: Crime in the Caribbean

This is the kind of crap we're having to put up with these days in Cayman. What a shame!
https://www.caymanmarlroad.com/forum...ice-in-one-day
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