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perkinsgap Aug 16th 2004 10:39 am

how cold is cold
 
Hi
Just want know when you are talking about it being cold how cold is that and are there places which are not as cold as other places or any where that dose not get snow and the best place for skiing not the ones we all know about are most of the roads ok in the snow.
thanks :cool: :rolleyes:

Toontje Aug 16th 2004 11:56 am

Re: who cold is cold
 

Chilly: below zero with blowing wind and sleet

Nippy: well below zero with gale-force winds, ten-foot-high snowbanks and roaming polar bears

Cold: minus 40 with a wind-chill factor of at least 100 below (also known as "Jesus H. Christ, it's cold!")

Really cold: exposed flesh freezes in ten minutes

Very cold: exposed flesh freezes in five minutes

Damn cold: two minutes

Really very damn cold: one minute

Freezing: who needs ten fingers anyway?

Too cold to go to the mall: theoretical temperature used only in scientific hypotheses (like the infinity symbol, only more abstract)

Note: none of this applies to people living in Victoria, the [email protected]@rds.

Source: How to be a Canadian, by Will Ferguson & Ian Ferguson

KimS Aug 16th 2004 12:55 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by perkinsgap
Hi
Just want know when you are talking about it being cold how cold is that and are there place which are not as cold as other place or any where that dose not got snow and the best place for skiing not be the ones we all know
are most road ok in the snow
thanks :cool: :rolleyes:

Hello, Perkinsgap,

I'm a Canuck who has been away a few years, and I can only really speak for the East Coast.

It's difficult to equate temperatures, as I only really understand degrees C, but anything minus zero C is quite simply freezing, and there should be no second thoughts about dressing accordingly. (Yes, you will see high school students with open jackets and University students with shorts, but if they live, they'll learn!)

Personally, when I hear the words, "windchill factor," that's when I sit up and take notice. Even moderate windchill feels like a white hot knife on your skin, so try not to leave too much exposed!

The Mounties are very good about telling Canadians when to stay off the roads during inclement weather, and that's another red flag that should not be ignored. Schools are generally closed on particularly nasty days, although I do recall once standing at the end of our impossibly long rural driveway, waiting for a bus in -50 C (windchill factored) weather! With snow tires (non-negotiable: expect to own some) or chains, most people cope reasonably well. I know here in the UK a light dusting causes havoc, but it's only because cars are not equipped for it.

Anywhere that skiiing is possible can be very cold in winter, but conversely, most places that offer skiing can also be very nice (i.e. warm) in summer. I can't think of anywhere in Canada that simply does not ever get snow at some time, as even living as close to the southern limit as you can is no guarantee of being snow-free. I think BC tends to run warmer and have more "green Christmas's", so I guess that is the best place to exerience the least amount of snow and cold.

ksct97 Aug 16th 2004 1:04 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
do those of you living in canada expect a harsh winter? heard its been a fairly decent summer, so...?

iaink Aug 16th 2004 2:10 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by ksct97
do those of you living in canada expect a harsh winter? heard its been a fairly decent summer, so...?

Where did you hear that? East of the Rockies its been the worst summer for ages, loads of rain, very few hot sunny days.

Course we expected a harsh winter, but I was surprised how sunny it is most of the time, and the layer of snow gives everything a clean layer of respectability. I actually enjoy the first couple of months of winter, but come March it starts to drag.

Iain

Glaswegian Aug 16th 2004 2:27 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by iaink
but come March it starts to drag.

Can you imagine what it's like when it's still snowing in May?
Calgary gets one of the shortest summers in Canada - day and night temperatures can differ by 10 to 20 degrees C.
It's August - we get warm days and cooler nights - I'm expecting to see snow before the end of September.

iaink Aug 16th 2004 2:46 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by Glaswegian
Can you imagine what it's like when it's still snowing in May?
Calgary gets one of the shortest summers in Canada - day and night temperatures can differ by 10 to 20 degrees C.
It's August - we get warm days and cooler nights - I'm expecting to see snow before the end of September.

I've seen snow in Early may (with 0.5in freezing rain on top) in Ontario, I was just saying come march its beginning to drag :) Usually done by Mid april to be fair. This "summer" certainly has sucked big time though. Some of the trees around here are starting to turn already!

Iain

joggerjo Aug 16th 2004 3:50 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by perkinsgap
Hi
Just want know when you are talking about it being cold how cold is that and are there places which are not as cold as other places or any where that dose not get snow and the best place for skiing not the ones we all know about are most of the roads ok in the snow.
thanks :cool: :rolleyes:

Hi

We don't get much snow here in the Okanagan, most of it falls at the ski resorts! Our winters are mild, you get an odd day where it is very cold but not that often. Our summers are always hot and dry and we have a very low rainfall. Canada is such a big country it really does depend where you are.

JJ

Glaswegian Aug 16th 2004 6:24 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
In Calgary its sunny a lot of the time. Its usually very dry(except this summer). This helps with the cold. When we first arrived I was very surprised how "mild" minus 17 felt when the sun shines. I now think of it as 'cold' when it reaches -25C. At -30 and below its too cold to walk the children to school - we drive!

In the last three years school has not been closed due to bad weather - we have had weather where it is -40something (with windchill). At those times there is just no playground time - the children go in as soon as they arrive at school and stay in for recess.

I expect the first winter snow (as opposed to summer snow) to fall mid September and the last of the spring snow to fall in May! In the first two years we were here only the one July was without snow!

So far the weather has been breaking records -hottest, coldest, driest etc. I'm just waiting for the news to declare that this is 'the wettest summer since.....'

Mrs G

willmore Aug 16th 2004 8:40 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
I grew up (partly) in Manitoba/Ontario. Winnipeg had beautiful clear/sunny but incredibly cold days. I use to walk to/from school in -30 degree weather (no lie) and do lots of outdoor activities in the winter (we had an outdoor skating rink so my brother could practice his hockey and my sister/I could skate). The reason - the prairies have a different cold - it's a 'dry cold' where although you certainly feel the cold and must dress accordingly...the "dryness" allows you to still be very active outside. I can remember still having some snow in May and very short extremely dry summers and then the snow would start again by the middle of September.

In Ontario - (although some may argue) it's a very "damp" cold" where the dampness seems to get right into your bones no matter how active you are. that didn't stop us from having lots of fun outside - but funny enough my parents were more concerned about the kids playing outside in the dampness in winter in Ontario and us being outside in winnipeg.




Originally Posted by Glaswegian
In Calgary its sunny a lot of the time. Its usually very dry(except this summer). This helps with the cold. When we first arrived I was very surprised how "mild" minus 17 felt when the sun shines. I now think of it as 'cold' when it reaches -25C. At -30 and below its too cold to walk the children to school - we drive!

In the last three years school has not been closed due to bad weather - we have had weather where it is -40something (with windchill). At those times there is just no playground time - the children go in as soon as they arrive at school and stay in for recess.

I expect the first winter snow (as opposed to summer snow) to fall mid September and the last of the spring snow to fall in May! In the first two years we were here only the one July was without snow!

So far the weather has been breaking records -hottest, coldest, driest etc. I'm just waiting for the news to declare that this is 'the wettest summer since.....'

Mrs G


iaink Aug 16th 2004 8:50 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by willmore

In Ontario - (although some may argue) it's a very "damp" cold" where the dampness seems to get right into your bones no matter how active you are. that didn't stop us from having lots of fun outside - but funny enough my parents were more concerned about the kids playing outside in the dampness in winter in Ontario and us being outside in winnipeg.


I would definetely argue with that one. Compared to the UK (if not winterpeg) it is a very dry cold. We have found moisturisers etc are a necessity to prevent dry skin problems in the winter, and a humidifier for the furnace is a must as well otherwise our sinuses let us know all about it.

Iain

Corky Aug 16th 2004 9:04 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
It is really cold when your nose hairs freeze and break....And your nose sticks together. Now thats cold!

willmore Aug 16th 2004 11:32 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
That is so....true....I can remember as a kid in Winnipeg blowing my nose and everything "freezing" before I had a chance to finish!!!!!!, and being skating and having your inner clothes stick to you because it was so cold. Great memories


Originally Posted by Corky
It is really cold when your nose hairs freeze and break....And your nose sticks together. Now thats cold!


willmore Aug 16th 2004 11:35 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
Well, I guess it depends on your definition of "damp" and where you live in Ontario. True, Sudbury and further North it is dry - but still not as dry cold as Winnipeg I found. . I was in the UK in March/April and it was very damp/cold.

When my husband/I/kids go back to Kitchener (in Southern Ontario) for xmas each year, we really feel the "dampness" and we live in Victoria!!

Growing up we definitely had the same problem with dry skin, etc - but when my parents changed from oil to gas the problem was gone for the most part.


Originally Posted by iaink
I would definetely argue with that one. Compared to the UK (if not winterpeg) it is a very dry cold. We have found moisturisers etc are a necessity to prevent dry skin problems in the winter, and a humidifier for the furnace is a must as well otherwise our sinuses let us know all about it.

Iain


oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 4:55 am

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by iaink
I would definetely argue with that one. Compared to the UK (if not winterpeg) it is a very dry cold. We have found moisturisers etc are a necessity to prevent dry skin problems in the winter, and a humidifier for the furnace is a must as well otherwise our sinuses let us know all about it.

Iain

Willmore is absolutely correct comparing the relative "dampness" of a southern Ontario winter versus the "dry cold" of the Canadian prairie winter. The fact that you have to humidify your home is totally irrelevant to the argument.

shriver9 Aug 17th 2004 6:04 am

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by KimS
Hello, Perkinsgap,


Personally, when I hear the words, "windchill factor," that's when I sit up and take notice. Even moderate windchill feels like a white hot knife on your skin, so try not to leave too much exposed!

The Mounties are very good about telling Canadians when to stay off the roads during inclement weather, and that's another red flag that should not be ignored. .

Do you still hear of news / stories of people, who perhaps ignored the Mounties warning, got stuck in a blizzard and were found frozen to death in their cars the next day?

Cheers.

SimonG Aug 17th 2004 1:26 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Willmore is absolutely correct comparing the relative "dampness" of a southern Ontario winter versus the "dry cold" of the Canadian prairie winter. The fact that you have to humidify your home is totally irrelevant to the argument.

Have to agree with Ian. With the last winter being our first it was surprising how comfortable you felt outside even when it was really cold. Coming from the North East of England where the wind can really blow off the North Sea it was really nice not to feel the damp in your bones, and still to be able to ski, skate etc.

ukjo Aug 17th 2004 1:34 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
You want to know cold, damp, wet and windy weather?? Come to Nova Scotia!!!!!! I got off the plane back in January to minus 35 degrees. 6 weeks later we get the worst snowfall for 60 years and it won't bloody melt for another 2 months!! And as for the dampness....I've never known anywhere that it takes 3 days just to dry a pair of kids shorts indoors!! Everywhere we step in barefoot in the house feels damp and cold. It's now the middle of August and the rain is lashing down the front of the house as I speak. Atleast it makes me feel as though I am at home so the homesickness isn't as bad!!!lol

Oh and we had a week of glorious sunshine back in June that made me look as though I had just spent a month in Barbados. Why on earth am I moaning?????lol :rolleyes:

iaink Aug 17th 2004 1:44 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Willmore is absolutely correct comparing the relative "dampness" of a southern Ontario winter versus the "dry cold" of the Canadian prairie winter. The fact that you have to humidify your home is totally irrelevant to the argument.

You just love an argument dont you. This is the BRITISH expats forum. Anyone coming from britain would not consider an Ontario winter anything but low humidity.

oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 2:45 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by iaink
I would definetely argue with that one.


Originally Posted by iaink
You just love an argument dont you. This is the BRITISH expats forum. Anyone coming from britain would not consider an Ontario winter anything but low humidity.

Actually, I was agreeing with willmore. If I argued, I had some company. ;)

Sorry Iaink, I thought willmore was comparing southern Ontario winters with those of Winnipeg. Some Brits might be interested in the difference between the winter climate of those two parts of Canada.

thornhill Aug 17th 2004 3:09 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Willmore is absolutely correct comparing the relative "dampness" of a southern Ontario winter versus the "dry cold" of the Canadian prairie winter. The fact that you have to humidify your home is totally irrelevant to the argument.

according to CHMC the inside of a home is a Micro-climate and is therefore relevent.

oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 3:18 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by thornhill
according to CHMC the inside of a home is a Micro-climate and is therefore relevent.

The problem that occurs on the Canadian prairies in the winter, is when you turn up the humidifier, the addition moisture often condenses on the windows and forms ice when it is particularly cold. I've seen it as thick as 2 inches on windows. When that occurs, there's little you can do to increase the humidity in the home. Whereas in southern Ontario (where I grew up), it generally doesn't get cold enough for that to occur. Ergo, efforts to humidify the indoor air will be successful.

daisymoll Aug 17th 2004 4:13 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by ukjo
You want to know cold, damp, wet and windy weather?? Come to Nova Scotia!!!!!! I got off the plane back in January to minus 35 degrees. 6 weeks later we get the worst snowfall for 60 years and it won't bloody melt for another 2 months!! And as for the dampness....I've never known anywhere that it takes 3 days just to dry a pair of kids shorts indoors!! Everywhere we step in barefoot in the house feels damp and cold. It's now the middle of August and the rain is lashing down the front of the house as I speak. Atleast it makes me feel as though I am at home so the homesickness isn't as bad!!!lol

Oh and we had a week of glorious sunshine back in June that made me look as though I had just spent a month in Barbados. Why on earth am I moaning?????lol :rolleyes:


Couldn't agree more, winter seems to last forever in NS so be warned to all those going out there!!!

willmore Aug 17th 2004 4:28 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
I WAS and STILL AM comparing Manitoba/Ontario winters. Once you have lived in both places you will know the difference between "dry" cold and "damp" cold. Even the snow is different - the snow in Winnipeg (for the most part) is soft and flaky, the snow in Ontario is usually so wet you can hardly shovel it without having a heart attack with all those ice chunks!!!!

We get dry skin and chapped lips in the winter......and we live in Victoria on Vancouver Island where it is a "virtual rain forest".....so your argument about dry skin doesn't hold up!!!!!!!!



Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Actually, I was agreeing with willmore. If I argued, I had some company. ;)

Sorry Iaink, I thought willmore was comparing southern Ontario winters with those of Winnipeg. Some Brits might be interested in the difference between the winter climate of those two parts of Canada.


oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 4:53 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by willmore
I WAS and STILL AM comparing Manitoba/Ontario winters. Once you have lived in both places you will know the difference between "dry" cold and "damp" cold. Even the snow is different - the snow in Winnipeg (for the most part) is soft and flaky, the snow in Ontario is usually so wet you can hardly shovel it without having a heart attack with all those ice chunks!!!!

We get dry skin and chapped lips in the winter......and we live in Victoria on Vancouver Island where it is a "virtual rain forest".....so your argument about dry skin doesn't hold up!!!!!!!!

Yes, I agree. The dry skin comes from low humidity inside the home, not outside. :)

iaink Aug 17th 2004 5:24 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Yes, I agree. The dry skin comes from low humidity inside the home, not outside. :)

So why is the air in my home so dry in the winter if it is not because it is coming in from outside, where it is too cold to hold much moisture? I dont see how you can separate the conditions inside and outside, the first will affect the second, just as it will get humid inside in the summer. All you can do is try to work around it iwth humidifiers, AC, whatever.

I am not arguing that Ontario is dryer than Manitoba here, all I am saying is that the average brit will find it dry in Ontario compared to the UK winter. Cant argue with physics, cold air will carry less moisture, and its colder in manitoba than...well almost anywhere:)

I can only imagine how uncomfortable I would be in Manitoba.

Iain

willmore Aug 17th 2004 8:34 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 
Ah, you must be a engineer - you're thinking too logically.

How do you heat your house? I can tell you that my parents heated with "oil" for many many years - finally got 3 different recommendations from the internet and furnace/air experts who told them that heating with "gas" would make a difference - less dry skin, sinus problems, etc. They claim that (even with the expense) it was worthwhile to change, although my mom finds the house doesn't get as warm with the gas as with oil - go....figure......

You are correct with the notion of how damp/cold it is in the UK. I spent 2 months in England/Ireland/Scotland/Wales in March/April. I have never been so cold - I finally had to buy a thermo sweater to wear under my gortex jacket on top of 2 other warm sweaters!!!!!

Funny, though, I don't think you would be as cold in Manitoba. As kids we spent a great deal of time outside with sports, building caves, walking to school, etc. as I said before, I never felt the cold in the same way as I did in Ontario.

In the end, it's whatever you're use to, I guess!!!!!

Iain[/QUOTE]

iaink Aug 17th 2004 8:51 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by willmore
Ah, you must be a engineer - you're thinking too logically.

:D

We have oil heat suplimented by the occasional wood fire. Gas isnt an option where I am, otherwise we would go that way for economic reasons alone, although as you pointed out oil will get hotter quicker. Just last week we finally replaced the leaking dragon in the basement and had a new oil fired furnace and water heater put in. $$$$ :(

I really dont see how the heat source affects anything (sorry, being logical again), as the actual hot air that circulates is separated from the fuel by the heat exchanger. None of the combustion air should make it into the house, or else you risk CO poisoning. Electric heat was just as bad when we were in an apartment, but even more expensive. We are glad to be rid of our electric water heater.

Ive a feeling that as kids none of us feel the cold as much as we do as adults, my daughter certainly doesnt seem to care as much as her mum does about her going out in the cold.

Its certainly true that you get used to it, I dont really think about the winter weather as bad anymore, must be going native!

Iain

oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 8:58 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by iaink
So why is the air in my home so dry in the winter if it is not because it is coming in from outside, where it is too cold to hold much moisture? I dont see how you can separate the conditions inside and outside, the first will affect the second, just as it will get humid inside in the summer. All you can do is try to work around it iwth humidifiers, AC, whatever.

I am not arguing that Ontario is dryer than Manitoba here, all I am saying is that the average brit will find it dry in Ontario compared to the UK winter. Cant argue with physics, cold air will carry less moisture, and its colder in manitoba than...well almost anywhere:)

I can only imagine how uncomfortable I would be in Manitoba.

Iain

I understand your point, now I'll explain mine in more detail comparing Winnipeg with a southern Ontario city like Belleville.

While it is true that the absolute amount of moisture (absolute humidity) that air can hold is proportional to the temperature of the air, other factors influence the relative humidity of the air. During the winter in southern Ontario, you get more overcast days, and the temperature is often only a few degrees below freezing. Snow only a few degrees below freezing tends to be slushy (heavy) and can add moisture to the air more readily than colder (light) snow. The greater number of overcast days (in southern Ontario) also contributes to an average higher relative humidity even when the temperature is the same (during the winter) when compared to sunnier Winnipeg.

You're near Belleville, which is ranked #41 in Canada for sunniest winters (289 hours). Whilst Winnipeg is ranked #2 in that category (358 hours).

For the "driest winter air", Belleville is ranked #56 in Canada (.37 kPa - lowest average hourly vapor pressure), while Winnipeg is ranked #8 (.20 kPa - lowest average hourly vapor pressure). In general, when you are outside in the winter, it often feels somewhat damper and colder in Belleville than in Winnipeg even at the same wind speed and temperature. Moist air will transfer heat away from the skin more quickly than dry air at the same temperature.

Your furnace (among other things) allows air from outside to enter your home. The drier winter air in Winnipeg will require (relative to Belleville) much more moisture to be added to attain the same relative humidity inside the home. Certainly, during the winter, you will find the air inside your home in Belleville to be dry if you don't humidify it. In Winnipeg, even if you humidify the air, the added moisture will often form ice on the inside of the windows because the glass is so cold, and the inside air will remain rather dry.

In turn, Belleville winter air would seem dry relative to what you experienced in the UK.

iaink Aug 17th 2004 9:11 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
You are of course correct as always, but the original statement I was arguing with was "In Ontario - (although some may argue) it's a very "damp" cold"

OK compared to Manitoba, the driest coldest place around, that may be true, but to anyone coming from the UK it seems like a strange statement, as it is by no stretch of the imagination VERY damp. I guess its all a case of "Relative Humidity". Duck / Grin...sorry, couldnt help myself, its a techy joke.

Iain

oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 9:20 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by iaink
You are of course correct as always, but the original statement I was arguing with was "In Ontario - (although some may argue) it's a very "damp" cold"

OK compared to Manitoba, the driest coldest place around, that may be true, but to anyone coming from the UK it seems like a strange statement, as it is by no stretch of the imagination VERY damp. I guess its all a case of "Relative Humidity". Duck / Grin...sorry, couldnt help myself, its a techy joke.

Iain

In the winter, just be sure to be sure to maintain a relatively high relative humidity, or you'll be in for some static - not from me - but from mother nature herself in the form of static electicity. ;)

iaink Aug 17th 2004 9:27 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
In the winter, just be sure to be sure to maintain a relatively high relative humidity, or you'll be in for some static - not from me - but from mother nature herself in the form of static electicity. ;)

Thats a shocker :D:D:D

OK. Lets stop this now.

KimS Aug 17th 2004 9:28 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by shriver9
Do you still hear of news / stories of people, who perhaps ignored the Mounties warning, got stuck in a blizzard and were found frozen to death in their cars the next day?

Cheers.

Hi, Shriver9,

I haven't been in Canada for a few years, but I don't recall any specific stories to that effect. I think most people who traditionally die in their cars (whether warned to stay off the roads or not) actually succumb to exhaust fumes after trying to warm themselves by keeping the engine and heater running. I think more cars slide off the road and get stuck in ditches than actually have to stop for being snowbound, so injuries might play a part in cases like that, too.

I think the Mounties chiefly warn us so they don't have to preside over all the prangs that result when cars skid into one another! ;)

oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 9:45 pm

Re: how cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by KimS
Hi, Shriver9,

I think most people who traditionally die in their cars (whether warned to stay off the roads or not) actually succumb to exhaust fumes after trying to warm themselves by keeping the engine and heater running. I think more cars slide off the road and get stuck in ditches than actually have to stop for being snowbound, so injuries might play a part in cases like that, too.

;)

Often the reason they die from exhaust fumes (CO in the fumes actually), is because they have leaks in the exhaust system of the vehicle. It's a good idea to get this checked at a muffler place late in the autumn, so the same doesn't happen to you in the winter.

It's even more important to get the heat exchanger on your furnace checked for holes, leaks or any damage before winter. That's probably a more common way to die in Canada from CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning. My sister's neighbors nearly died from CO poisoning because the heat exchanger on their furnace was corroded.

willmore Aug 17th 2004 10:43 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
You two are unbelievable!!! You must both be engineers!!!!. I think you should both become marine biologists like myself where you can be less logical and sensible!!!!!

But just remember that the original statement was made comparing Manitoba to Ontario NOT to the UK!!!!!!! which is like comparing apples to oranges instead of apples to nectarines!!!!

Sorry....very bad joke.....just finished an all-nighter and I'm a bit crazed!!!!


Originally Posted by iaink
Thats a shocker :D:D:D

OK. Lets stop this now.


oceanMDX Aug 17th 2004 11:01 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
Since you're into biology, when will Okanagan nectarines and apples be in season around here? Better be before I go back to Mexico in about 3 weeks.

willmore Aug 17th 2004 11:18 pm

Re: who cold is cold
 
We got some nectarines and cherries from the Okanagan through a friend who just came back from a camping trip there - absolutely delicious

This was at least a week ago...... we didn't get any apples....and the ones you buy in the store are still terrible......but we have picked a few from our tree already - really good.

By the way, in case you don't know.....a marine biologist's field really isn't the ripening time of Okanagan fruit!!!!! I'm into the marine plant and organisms (tidal pools are my thing)....I know!!!! not as interesting as being a engineer.....


Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Since you're into biology, when will Okanagan nectarines and apples be in season around here? Better be before I go back to Mexico in about 3 weeks.


thornhill Aug 18th 2004 1:59 am

Re: who cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by oceanMDX
In the winter, just be sure to be sure to maintain a relatively high relative humidity, or you'll be in for some static - not from me - but from mother nature herself in the form of static electicity. ;)

Moisture in the house or even worse trapped between the vapour barriers in wall/ceiling system can be a disaster for the framing.

saying this actually feeling the dampness in the cold air is a way worse (to me) than the -40 -50 and bone dry temps of the arctic, that I could stand.
I flew from the North to Glasgow via Calgary in late January I was working at Coppermine arrived in Glasgow to 2 celcius and a wind .I was Frozen, I never felt like I was warm on the whole trip untill a cousin arrived home from a fishing trip off Iceland and the Banks . he gave me a new wool sweater and longs to wear,I swear I was still Frozen couple of days later we had sub -5 days and clear ,I felt warmer. All in the head?? who knows ,no doubt some of you boffins will have the thery

oceanMDX Aug 18th 2004 2:11 am

Re: who cold is cold
 

Originally Posted by thornhill
Moisture in the house or even worse trapped between the vapour barriers in wall/ceiling system can be a disaster for the framing.

saying this actually feeling the dampness in the cold air is a way worse (to me) than the -40 -50 and bone dry temps of the arctic, that I could stand.
I flew from the North to Glasgow via Calgary in late January I was working at Coppermine arrived in Glasgow to 2 celcius and a wind .I was Frozen, I never felt like I was warm on the whole trip untill a cousin arrived home from a fishing trip off Iceland and the Banks . he gave me a new wool sweater and longs to wear,I swear I was still Frozen couple of days later we had sub -5 days and clear ,I felt warmer. All in the head?? who knows ,no doubt some of you boffins will have the thery

The circumstances during the winter in your location in Port Coquitlam is very different than in Ontario, or the Canadian prairies. Where you are the constant winter dampness can lead to internal rot if the home is not properly protected against it. Remember the "leaky condo" fiasco in BC? I refuse to store my motor home outdoors in the lower mainland of BC due to the dampness problem. Storing it in Merritt (much drier) poses no such problem. In most other parts of the country, just don't humidify to the point where the moisture condenses on the windows and rot should not be a self-inflicted problem.

willmore Aug 18th 2004 2:21 am

Re: who cold is cold
 
Forgot to add.....you're not planning to take the fruit back to Mexico with you are you? How do you plan to get it through the States? I went to the UK in the spring and threw an apple/banana in my knapsnack - the "sniffing dog at customs in Seattle found them immediately and I was taken aside and my precious "fruit" was taken away after being thoroughly searched (you know how shifty these Canadians can be)!!!!


Originally Posted by oceanMDX
Since you're into biology, when will Okanagan nectarines and apples be in season around here? Better be before I go back to Mexico in about 3 weeks.



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