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views on UK v Canada school curriculum

views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Old Apr 25th 2016, 12:49 am
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Originally Posted by Karen BC View Post
I did when I was 10, and I think my experience is still relevant today. I had skipped a grade (3) in Canada so wasn't' too 'behind' but the whole institution in Britain was so different, coupled with a new culture, that is was a massive change. I found school much more disciplined and authoritarian with less encouragement of independent growth and thought and instead, heavy emphasis purely on academics. In those days, the 11+ was still around, so within a year I was streamed into a girls grammar school and taught very traditionally. I remember going back to Canada for a visit when I was 16, and accompanying my cousins to their school to pick up their end-of-year papers, see their friends, etc., and being very surprised at how amicable their attitude to school was. There was a real sense of community; kids and teachers interacted in a friendly manner, there was a real camaraderie and team spirit in the high school; dances, football, softball, etc. I was jealous of the courses on offer (I remember graphic arts as that was up my alley), so much more than just the academics I was being taught.
I did get 9 'O' levels and 2 'A' levels but I regret not experiencing a high school graduation. After relocating to BC, when my sons were in grade 12, I made sure I was part of the parents committee involved in the graduation celebrations, to make up for it a bit!
Of course, they’re too busy having pajama day or beach day or dressing up as a rabbit day or some such nonsense The school outings seem to be to some kind of kids play park or to the water slides or some other gimmicky rubbish. Parental involvement in school also seems weak. All they do is organize pizza deliveries or movie nights. I know many lecturers at universities complain that the first year is most often spent on teaching remedial education to make up for the lack of academic basics because the students haven’t been taught them in high school.

Last edited by Oink; Apr 25th 2016 at 12:53 am.
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Old Apr 25th 2016, 2:18 am
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

But the University lecturers in the UK complain about having to engage in remedial education too, so not sure that the students coming through A levels are overall of higher quality.

My kids (ages 9 and 12) seem mostly happy to be at school and not half as stressed as their UK cousins. Whether that's down to personality, home life or schooling is hard to tell, but it's something I think about from time to time.
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Old Apr 25th 2016, 3:06 am
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Originally Posted by Oink View Post
Of course, they’re too busy having pajama day or beach day or dressing up as a rabbit day or some such nonsense The school outings seem to be to some kind of kids play park or to the water slides or some other gimmicky rubbish. Parental involvement in school also seems weak. All they do is organize pizza deliveries or movie nights. I know many lecturers at universities complain that the first year is most often spent on teaching remedial education to make up for the lack of academic basics because the students haven’t been taught them in high school.

They aren't exactly taxed academically throughout High School and as you say when they leave for University they have a rude awakening and can struggle as they then have to knuckle down. Thankfully my two have inherited my brains and intellect

Originally Posted by lifeisajourney View Post
But the University lecturers in the UK complain about having to engage in remedial education too, so not sure that the students coming through A levels are overall of higher quality.

My kids (ages 9 and 12) seem mostly happy to be at school and not half as stressed as their UK cousins. Whether that's down to personality, home life or schooling is hard to tell, but it's something I think about from time to time.
Where out of interest do you draw your evidence for your first paragraph?-things must have really changed in the UK although I have to say I have doubts with the validity of your statement.

I'm glad re your kids being happy, that kind of makes things worthwhile- they do have an easy time of it so are bound to have a good time. I strongly feel that there should be substantially more demands on a high school kids to prepare them for Uni. Not so vital at Elementary schools. Ultimately they graduate from school, then hopefully from Uni and end up in a job that they like, with any luck.
I do feel that overall the UK education is " better" but there again I am personally skewed experience wise having been in the private education system and pups having been through it before the move over here. Obviously workwise I have had experience with people going through the local public system schools and so feel able to compare the education systems.
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Old Apr 25th 2016, 3:23 am
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Originally Posted by Stinkypup View Post

They aren't exactly taxed academically throughout High School and as you say when they leave for University they have a rude awakening and can struggle as they then have to knuckle down. Thankfully my two have inherited my brains and intellect



Where out of interest do you draw your evidence for your first paragraph?-things must have really changed in the UK although I have to say I have doubts with the validity of your statement.

I'm glad re your kids being happy, that kind of makes things worthwhile- they do have an easy time of it so are bound to have a good time. I strongly feel that there should be substantially more demands on a high school kids to prepare them for Uni. Not so vital at Elementary schools. Ultimately they graduate from school, then hopefully from Uni and end up in a job that they like, with any luck.
I do feel that overall the UK education is " better" but there again I am personally skewed experience wise having been in the private education system and pups having been through it before the move over here. Obviously workwise I have had experience with people going through the local public system schools and so feel able to compare the education systems.
I think the high school experience is somewhat school dependent. My husband and I both have Physics degrees (albeit from different countries). We put a strong emphasis on academics in our house, and although (as I have said) being very worried about the level of education at the start of high school, we were pretty satisfied with the content of their courses by grade 12. Our eldest son commented when he went to University that there was a huge gap between his knowledge and some of his peers. Apparently the level of Grade 12 education at some schools is weak compared to his.
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Old Apr 25th 2016, 4:13 am
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Originally Posted by HGerchikov View Post
I think the high school experience is somewhat school dependent. My husband and I both have Physics degrees (albeit from different countries). We put a strong emphasis on academics in our house, and although (as I have said) being very worried about the level of education at the start of high school, we were pretty satisfied with the content of their courses by grade 12. Our eldest son commented when he went to University that there was a huge gap between his knowledge and some of his peers. Apparently the level of Grade 12 education at some schools is weak compared to his.
Yep, I agree with you re school variability and this obviously would apply in the UK. I think that you both "keep/kept tabs" on things as your children progress through school, I'm sure more so than a lot of their peers and it seems to pay off. Let them drift and they will really struggle if they are less " academically able"
We in part chose the area to live with a view to good schools in the area as felt obviously that this was important. We too have kep a close eye on things with our two.My opinion re the two systems doesn't change however despite them going to a decent high school. (Eldest pup now out the other end, at Uni)

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Old Apr 25th 2016, 12:50 pm
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Default Re: views on UK v Canada school curriculum

Originally Posted by Stinkypup View Post

They aren't exactly taxed academically throughout High School and as you say when they leave for University they have a rude awakening and can struggle as they then have to knuckle down. Thankfully my two have inherited my brains and intellect
That depends. My kids were certainly pushed at their Toronto high school; regular classes and exams, ib classes exams and extended essays, (US) SAT cramming and exams. Some of the classes spilled over into night school. One of them reported being bored rigid in the first year of university, the other took a year off in order to forget everything, which was probably a good idea.
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