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UK nurse moving to Canada

UK nurse moving to Canada

Old Feb 4th 2018, 11:24 pm
  #31  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by Yorkiechef View Post
Yes I am. In Canada, it is common practice to use brand names, it would be frowned upon in UK.

Just to take your education one step further, Tylenol 3 has 15mg of codine and is a controlled drug that is accounted for in the Cd cupboard......unlike UK.

Different jurisdiction and rules, Tylenol 2 has 8mg, care to make a guess at that...cd or not? Well? I'll let you google that........
erm...almost. Tylenol 1 8 mg (over the counter)
Tylenol 2 15 mg
Tylenol 3 30 mg
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 11:48 pm
  #32  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by anders101 View Post
erm...almost. Tylenol 1 8 mg (over the counter)
Tylenol 2 15 mg
Tylenol 3 30 mg
Oh >snip<....you're right! Proof that we should leave this stuff to dedicated professionals. Funny.

See that is how you deal with being corrected, with humour and humility.

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Old Feb 5th 2018, 1:01 am
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by Yorkiechef View Post
Yes I am. In Canada, it is common practice to use brand names, it would be frowned upon in UK.

Just to take your education one step further, Tylenol 3 has 15mg of codine and is a controlled drug that is accounted for in the Cd cupboard......unlike UK.

Different jurisdiction and rules, Tylenol 2 has 8mg, care to make a guess at that...cd or not? Well? I'll let you google that........

wow


I didn't know any of that. I must be really really stupid. I wonder how I've managed to get this stage of my life without knowing it




I won't post to you if you stop posting to me, enough is enough.
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Old Feb 5th 2018, 3:15 am
  #34  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

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Old Feb 8th 2018, 5:50 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Hey guys...


Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this thread! I am a Scottish NICU Nurse. I am moving to Ontario with my husband in the next few months, just awaiting our PR to be accepted and completed.


I have completed NNAS and got a "non comparable" result, which is not of shock to me as I am a child branch trained nurse and worked in NICU for 10 years. I applied to CNO and my next step is to sit the CNO Jurisprudence Examination. I am currently looking at materials for studying... 3 hours and 175 questions I think it said.

Does anyone know what the next step after this is likely to be? I always thought it would be the NCLEX to test my knowledge but I keep hearing conflicting information.

Any insight would be fab...I am prepared to be told I will need to do some sort of bridging as my knowledge is paeds focused but ever hopeful I could pass NCLEX with the right study materials....
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Old Feb 8th 2018, 11:55 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by lauriet465 View Post
Hey guys...


Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this thread! I am a Scottish NICU Nurse. I am moving to Ontario with my husband in the next few months, just awaiting our PR to be accepted and completed.


I have completed NNAS and got a "non comparable" result, which is not of shock to me as I am a child branch trained nurse and worked in NICU for 10 years. I applied to CNO and my next step is to sit the CNO Jurisprudence Examination. I am currently looking at materials for studying... 3 hours and 175 questions I think it said.

Does anyone know what the next step after this is likely to be? I always thought it would be the NCLEX to test my knowledge but I keep hearing conflicting information.

Any insight would be fab...I am prepared to be told I will need to do some sort of bridging as my knowledge is paeds focused but ever hopeful I could pass NCLEX with the right study materials....
Hi, I cant help with insight into your bridging courses etc, however, I did sit the jurisprudence exam a few years ago. All I can say is don't bother studying for that. The CNO give you study guides before you sit. All the answers are there and it is an open book exam. The biggest thing is your skill in searching the articles at speed. I am being completely honest when I say I sat the exam with 2 friends at the table..(not nurses) and we each had a set of documents open on separate computers. We only just managed to finish it on time and it was exhausting. Some of it is common sense, but the rest you just wouldn't know without searching the phrases out in the documents. Just make sure you have a documenter friend with you and you will be fine. I needed a stiff gin after. At least you find out if you have passed within minutes of submitting your final answer. Good luck
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Old Feb 9th 2018, 1:28 am
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by lauriet465 View Post
Hey guys...


Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this thread! I am a Scottish NICU Nurse. I am moving to Ontario with my husband in the next few months, just awaiting our PR to be accepted and completed.


I have completed NNAS and got a "non comparable" result, which is not of shock to me as I am a child branch trained nurse and worked in NICU for 10 years. I applied to CNO and my next step is to sit the CNO Jurisprudence Examination. I am currently looking at materials for studying... 3 hours and 175 questions I think it said.

Does anyone know what the next step after this is likely to be? I always thought it would be the NCLEX to test my knowledge but I keep hearing conflicting information.

Any insight would be fab...I am prepared to be told I will need to do some sort of bridging as my knowledge is paeds focused but ever hopeful I could pass NCLEX with the right study materials....
I'm sure you could. I was an xray tech until recently and help an RN friend study for her NCLEX. We went though many many of the test questions, looked at the answers. Worked out her supposedly weak areas. It's fine, no big deal.
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Old Feb 9th 2018, 3:18 pm
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Firstly don’t book anything!!!

I’m canadian and trained in uk. I’m a year and a half into the process and still no light at the end of the tunnel. The nnas is just the beginning. You see no one tells you anything about how the process really works or how much you have to do or how much it’ll cost!!! You’ll have assessments to do and they have gone up in price now the computer assessment is now $500 and sim lab is $1500. That’s just the start. It’s all about money and de-skilling good nurses.

I’ve also been told I need to do the return to practice course. I’m ok with this. Except now I’ve been told I need to be either an hca or Lpn working. Now this was never disclosed to me and the uni says I need 1600 hours before getting in the course???? Crnbc have told me this course needs to be completed in 3 years! Hmmm how am I supposed to do all this??? The whole idea was for me to become an RN again. Can anyone help

Last edited by christmasoompa; Feb 9th 2018 at 3:31 pm. Reason: Posts merged - there's an edit button you can use if you think of something you want to add just after posting.
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Old Feb 9th 2018, 4:41 pm
  #39  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by anders101 View Post
Hi, I cant help with insight into your bridging courses etc, however, I did sit the jurisprudence exam a few years ago. All I can say is don't bother studying for that. The CNO give you study guides before you sit. All the answers are there and it is an open book exam. The biggest thing is your skill in searching the articles at speed. I am being completely honest when I say I sat the exam with 2 friends at the table..(not nurses) and we each had a set of documents open on separate computers. We only just managed to finish it on time and it was exhausting. Some of it is common sense, but the rest you just wouldn't know without searching the phrases out in the documents. Just make sure you have a documenter friend with you and you will be fine. I needed a stiff gin after. At least you find out if you have passed within minutes of submitting your final answer. Good luck
Thanks so much for the advice, I did know it was an open book but figured I wouldn't have the time to search for answers and finish in time. I'll definitely recruit some friends to help out. Good to know the pass/fail is almost instant. So much waiting around already!

Originally Posted by bats View Post
I'm sure you could. I was an xray tech until recently and help an RN friend study for her NCLEX. We went though many many of the test questions, looked at the answers. Worked out her supposedly weak areas. It's fine, no big deal.
I have an app on my phone that has NCLEX questions, at the moment I'm getting around 40-45% pass. Admittedly I haven't looked at it for ages but I'm hopeful with enough study I can pass it. I have a General RN nurse who could help me (although I scored 2% better in the app lol). Good to know it can be done though. Every little bit helps to try and cut down the time it will take to get registered.

Originally Posted by Ridiculousprocess View Post
Firstly don’t book anything!!!

I’m canadian and trained in uk. I’m a year and a half into the process and still no light at the end of the tunnel. The nnas is just the beginning. You see no one tells you anything about how the process really works or how much you have to do or how much it’ll cost!!! You’ll have assessments to do and they have gone up in price now the computer assessment is now $500 and sim lab is $1500. That’s just the start. It’s all about money and de-skilling good nurses.

I’ve also been told I need to do the return to practice course. I’m ok with this. Except now I’ve been told I need to be either an hca or Lpn working. Now this was never disclosed to me and the uni says I need 1600 hours before getting in the course???? Crnbc have told me this course needs to be completed in 3 years! Hmmm how am I supposed to do all this??? The whole idea was for me to become an RN again. Can anyone help
I'm not planning to book anything until I am told to...I wouldn't risk it as I don't know what I will need to do next. I am a little frustrated that I've not been told the process but at the same time I am very open to what hoops I need to jump through. I think it seems different for everyone depending on the training they've had and Province they apply to. I'm in this for the long haul.

Is the return to practice in the UK or Canada? As long as the clinical hours are kept up then there shouldn't be a reason for RTP in the UK. I've already met my clinical hours in the UK until October 2019 so I'm not too concerned as I essentially have until October 2022 to meet my practice hours. I'm hoping to not still be trying to register in Canada in 4 years time :/
I can't speak for what happens in Canada though and why you'd need to do the return to practice if you've been studying.
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Old Feb 9th 2018, 5:41 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

The return to practice is in Canada. I have my uk hours until 2019 but they don’t appear to count. The uni said specifically Lpn hca 1600 hours. Crazy yes why do a job I have no intention of staying in. The RRNP has a 300 hour placement so surely that’s good enough to evaluate my competencies. I feel the new crnbc rules system was thrown together and is only about money! It is beyond frustrating when at every turn something else is thrown at you. The process should be an open book and you should be able to see the whole process on their website. Not one step at a time. Like I said this is almost 2 years for me and $1000s out of pocket. Not to mention everyday I’m se skilling.
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Old Feb 13th 2018, 11:07 am
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by lauriet465 View Post
Hey guys...


Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this thread! I am a Scottish NICU Nurse. I am moving to Ontario with my husband in the next few months, just awaiting our PR to be accepted and completed.


I have completed NNAS and got a "non comparable" result, which is not of shock to me as I am a child branch trained nurse and worked in NICU for 10 years. I applied to CNO and my next step is to sit the CNO Jurisprudence Examination. I am currently looking at materials for studying... 3 hours and 175 questions I think it said.

Does anyone know what the next step after this is likely to be? I always thought it would be the NCLEX to test my knowledge but I keep hearing conflicting information.

Any insight would be fab...I am prepared to be told I will need to do some sort of bridging as my knowledge is paeds focused but ever hopeful I could pass NCLEX with the right study materials....
Hi,

Thanks for getting in on the thread, the more info the better.
I have decided to scrap british columbia altogether, I agree with what some of the other commenters have said about them just trying to make money, nearly £500 just to be told I have to be competency assessed, even though they already knew I would have to be.

I have done a new NNAS for Ontario and added NS on just as an extra.

I am adult trained intially on the advanced diploma and then completed my degree and 2 years of my masters in NICU.

I just hope Ontario take into account work experience and time served etc...

I managed to speak to CNO and they said each application is assessed individually rather than looking to see what CRNBC have said first so fingers crossed, they also said on the phone that although they obviosuly couldnt say for sure, it didn't sound like I would need to be comptency assessed.

Nicole.
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Old Feb 21st 2018, 7:55 am
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

I wouldn't advise anyone apply to CRNBC or CNO for their first license. I got some really good advice that helped me circumnavigate a lot of the extra stuff some of you have gone through. I just got my license last year. It still took a year to get but...
I applied to Nova Scotia for my first license. They were happy to accept my UK RN hours, they reviewed my experience and decided that even as an adult branch trained nurse, because I had worked in an emergency department, I had the requisite entry level skills for paeds, mental health and maternity. They can ask you to do a bridging programme or a practical exam but I didn't have to do either. Some other provinces make every IEN do a bridging programme or practical exam, definitely research your first license location. Once you have a Canadian license, you can have it endorsed to any other province or territory within a couple of weeks, no extra checks other than police check required.
it took me 13 months in total:
6 months from applying to NNAS and submitting all of my documents until I got a report that said my pre-reg education was somewhat comparable (you have t lead your university through the paperwork and tell them exactly what you want it to say).
It then took 3 months for CRNNS to assess my post-reg quals and experience and decide they were happy for me to sit the NCLEX.
I had my exam date 3 months later.
The last month of the process was the open book jurisprudence exam online (so easy, only spent a day reading through the materials first) and getting my license issued.
I'm actually now practicing in Yukon and the process to have my license transferred took 7 working days. no hassle.
I think I was lucky, I obviously had to pay the NNAS fees and the application and licensing fees but I didn't have the costs of practical exams and bridging programmes. I couldn't have afforded to do that and certainly wouldn't have been working here as a HCA.
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Old Feb 21st 2018, 12:32 pm
  #43  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by mikey8954 View Post
I wouldn't advise anyone apply to CRNBC or CNO for their first license. I got some really good advice that helped me circumnavigate a lot of the extra stuff some of you have gone through. I just got my license last year. It still took a year to get but...
I applied to Nova Scotia for my first license. They were happy to accept my UK RN hours, they reviewed my experience and decided that even as an adult branch trained nurse, because I had worked in an emergency department, I had the requisite entry level skills for paeds, mental health and maternity. They can ask you to do a bridging programme or a practical exam but I didn't have to do either. Some other provinces make every IEN do a bridging programme or practical exam, definitely research your first license location. Once you have a Canadian license, you can have it endorsed to any other province or territory within a couple of weeks, no extra checks other than police check required.
it took me 13 months in total:
6 months from applying to NNAS and submitting all of my documents until I got a report that said my pre-reg education was somewhat comparable (you have t lead your university through the paperwork and tell them exactly what you want it to say).
It then took 3 months for CRNNS to assess my post-reg quals and experience and decide they were happy for me to sit the NCLEX.
I had my exam date 3 months later.
The last month of the process was the open book jurisprudence exam online (so easy, only spent a day reading through the materials first) and getting my license issued.
I'm actually now practicing in Yukon and the process to have my license transferred took 7 working days. no hassle.
I think I was lucky, I obviously had to pay the NNAS fees and the application and licensing fees but I didn't have the costs of practical exams and bridging programmes. I couldn't have afforded to do that and certainly wouldn't have been working here as a HCA.
Thanks for replying. I'm currently just waiting for my second advisory report. I had a fully comparable score originally so should be the same this time. I've applied to Ontario and Nova Scotia so will just see what happens I think. I'm adult trained but have then specialised in neonates so I'm hoping that helps things!
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Old Feb 24th 2018, 1:47 am
  #44  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by mikey8954 View Post
I wouldn't advise anyone apply to CRNBC or CNO for their first license. I got some really good advice that helped me circumnavigate a lot of the extra stuff some of you have gone through. I just got my license last year. It still took a year to get but...
I applied to Nova Scotia for my first license. They were happy to accept my UK RN hours, they reviewed my experience and decided that even as an adult branch trained nurse, because I had worked in an emergency department, I had the requisite entry level skills for paeds, mental health and maternity. They can ask you to do a bridging programme or a practical exam but I didn't have to do either. Some other provinces make every IEN do a bridging programme or practical exam, definitely research your first license location. Once you have a Canadian license, you can have it endorsed to any other province or territory within a couple of weeks, no extra checks other than police check required.
it took me 13 months in total:
6 months from applying to NNAS and submitting all of my documents until I got a report that said my pre-reg education was somewhat comparable (you have t lead your university through the paperwork and tell them exactly what you want it to say).
It then took 3 months for CRNNS to assess my post-reg quals and experience and decide they were happy for me to sit the NCLEX.
I had my exam date 3 months later.
The last month of the process was the open book jurisprudence exam online (so easy, only spent a day reading through the materials first) and getting my license issued.
I'm actually now practicing in Yukon and the process to have my license transferred took 7 working days. no hassle.
I think I was lucky, I obviously had to pay the NNAS fees and the application and licensing fees but I didn't have the costs of practical exams and bridging programmes. I couldn't have afforded to do that and certainly wouldn't have been working here as a HCA.
That's good advice but we are already committed to Ontario & I've already applied to CNO. I've never worked in adults so I'm fully expecting the exams and bridging course. CNO emailed me today and said they had sent out a letter so I'm hoping that outlines the steps I need to take. I looked into NS but I think my nursing options would be extremely limited there as I have been a neonatal nurse for the last 10 yrs.
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Old Feb 24th 2018, 4:10 am
  #45  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by lauriet465 View Post
That's good advice but we are already committed to Ontario & I've already applied to CNO. I've never worked in adults so I'm fully expecting the exams and bridging course. CNO emailed me today and said they had sent out a letter so I'm hoping that outlines the steps I need to take. I looked into NS but I think my nursing options would be extremely limited there as I have been a neonatal nurse for the last 10 yrs.
You may find this site helpful - http://www.neonatalcann.ca/

McMaster Childrens Hospital is looking for a neonatal nurse
Job number: 69539 https://hhsc.taleo.net/careersection...ch.ftl?lang=en

Last edited by Siouxie; Feb 24th 2018 at 4:13 am.
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