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UK nurse moving to Canada

UK nurse moving to Canada

Old Nov 29th 2022, 6:31 am
  #196  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by Legally_olive View Post
Hi I am a Canadian PR and a British Citizen. Yes i trained in the UK and I am NMC registered.
OK, thanks for clarifying. So just checking, but if you trained in the UK and are newly qualified, you’ve spent enough time in Canada (or are living with a Canadian spouse?). Just wanted to check you have kept your PR status. I’m sure you’re fine and well aware of it all, but we sometimes have people that don’t realise what their residency obligations are to maintain PR status so thought I’d flag it just in case.
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Old Nov 29th 2022, 9:34 am
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

christmasoompa thank you for your response. I applied by myself through the express entry and only recently obtained my PR in March 2022 - which means I can still live outside Canada for another 3 years before I move permanently there to fulfill the 2 years (730 days) out of 5 years requirement to maintain PR status. However, since finishing my nursing, I have been travelling and will be travelling back and forth Canada and those days too will count.
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Old Nov 29th 2022, 9:47 am
  #198  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by Legally_olive View Post
christmasoompa thank you for your response. I applied by myself through the express entry and only recently obtained my PR in March 2022 - which means I can still live outside Canada for another 3 years before I move permanently there to fulfill the 2 years (730 days) out of 5 years requirement to maintain PR status. However, since finishing my nursing, I have been travelling and will be travelling back and forth Canada and those days too will count.
Ah, perfect. Just wanted to check! Hopefully you'll get your registration sorted before the 3 years is up so have plenty of leeway.
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Old Nov 29th 2022, 12:18 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by Legally_olive View Post
christmasoompa thank you for your response. I applied by myself through the express entry and only recently obtained my PR in March 2022 - which means I can still live outside Canada for another 3 years before I move permanently there to fulfill the 2 years (730 days) out of 5 years requirement to maintain PR status. However, since finishing my nursing, I have been travelling and will be travelling back and forth Canada and those days too will count.
Hello, well now you have to get through NNAS, and start asap. make sure u apply for both LPN and RpN. so you can work as LPN along with RN license journey.

As I am going through express entry at the moment ,on what basis did u apply for PR through EE? on HCA? experience?

Last edited by aftabahmed112; Nov 29th 2022 at 12:32 pm.
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Old Nov 29th 2022, 1:11 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Yes NNAS will be my next step now. No I applied EE-FSW as a corporate lawyer who then went on to train as RMN. I've got my bachelor and masters in law.
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Old Dec 7th 2022, 12:24 pm
  #201  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by 7InBC View Post
Hi,
I'm from the UK, and live and work in BC as an RPN. But I studied for that qualification here, so am not great with the NNAS side of things, sorry.
What I can tell you is that you will only need to sit EITHER the NCLEX or the RPNC, not both. From a quick search of the BCNM site, once you have your NNAS assessment, you would apply for registration through the BCNM and they assess your eligibility to sit the licensing exam. Without creating a new account, I can't progress further through that process to tell you what it looks like.
From what I hear, the NCLEX is the harder exam, but there is a wealth of study information available both online and in book form. The RPNC recently moved to computer based testing in line with the NCLEX, and is offered three times per year. In my experience there are less specifically psych related study resources, but the one available from the RPNC itself gives a decent look of what the test look like.
Depending on your NNAS assessment, you may want to sit the NCLEX over the RPNC if eligible, as it greatly increases your options for employment, should you have difficulty finding work in mental health (right now, that definitely won't be a problem!) RNs can work pretty much anywhere, possibly needing to take some specialty courses after graduation, but RPNs are pretty much restricted to mental health wards and facilities or long term care or other specialist units. I guess it depends if you value flexibility in the future. Right now, in BC at least, RPNs are paid exactly the same as RNs whether degree for diploma educated.
In any event, I would recommend doing as much study prep as you can as regularly as you can, because believe me, your ability to answer test questions as per the Gold Standard deteriorates very quickly once we have lived experience and what we actually do in practice differs from he textbook answer.
Good luck in your journey.
PS, come work in Kamloops BC, we have a great tertiary mental health facility and great scenery!
Hi 7inBC - it's great to have an RPN on the forum whom is actually working over in BC. We're part way through the process and my Wife is hoping to sit the RPNC exam once NNAS/NCAS have assessed her. I'm curious as to the type of work she can expect to find once registered with the BCCNM. Right now, she works in Primary Care, assessing those presenting to their GP surgery and will liaise with the GP commence on an anti-depressant, or signpost them to other services within PC (psychological therapy services, drug/alcohol services, social prescribing etc.), or refer to Secondary Care services. Before that, she worked in the Perinatal Mental Health Community Team supporting perinatal clients with anxiety/depression. She isn't keen on returning to inpatient services due to the unsociable hours and repetitive nature of the work, but she's also aware that she may have to start from the ground up again and spend some time on a ward. Is the pathway from ward to community-based work easy enough? Are the opportunities there? We're hoping to move to the Okanagan (Vernon possibly) if that makes any difference?
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Old Dec 7th 2022, 5:22 pm
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by mdonald1987 View Post
Hi 7inBC - it's great to have an RPN on the forum whom is actually working over in BC. We're part way through the process and my Wife is hoping to sit the RPNC exam once NNAS/NCAS have assessed her. I'm curious as to the type of work she can expect to find once registered with the BCCNM. Right now, she works in Primary Care, assessing those presenting to their GP surgery and will liaise with the GP commence on an anti-depressant, or signpost them to other services within PC (psychological therapy services, drug/alcohol services, social prescribing etc.), or refer to Secondary Care services. Before that, she worked in the Perinatal Mental Health Community Team supporting perinatal clients with anxiety/depression. She isn't keen on returning to inpatient services due to the unsociable hours and repetitive nature of the work, but she's also aware that she may have to start from the ground up again and spend some time on a ward. Is the pathway from ward to community-based work easy enough? Are the opportunities there? We're hoping to move to the Okanagan (Vernon possibly) if that makes any difference?
Vernon is lovely, about an hours drive from, and roughly half the population of Kamloops where I live and work in a provincial tertiary mental health facility. There are community services in Vernon, though I would guess much more limited than here in Kamloops, or in Kelowna (Vernon is roughly half way between the two). Vernon Jubilee Hospital, Kelowna General Hospital and Royal Inland Hospital (in Kamloops) offer psychiatric inpatient services and often transfer to my facility for a longer stay/escalation of treatment. RIH also employs RPNs in the emergency room (I would guess Kelowna does too, not sure VGH is big enough, but possibly). Services in all three towns are run by Interior Health Authority. Typically new grads (as I was due to my career change) will start out in a hospital setting or long term care. This is a good grounding and consolidates skills, but it sounds like your wife has experience in buckets. Moves to community are seen as desirable for many of the reasons your wife identifies, though mostly to avoid shift work. Pay in the community is less overall though as there are no unsocial hours payments or stat holiday pay, which can be lucrative. Interior Health operates on a seniority based model when it comes to job awards (and things like leave allocation etc) which means that once you have met the eligibility requirements for a job posting, you will be awarded based on length of service. If a job is posted in my facility, I have a three day window to apply before it is posted to the rest of interior health authority, and then after a set time if it remains unfilled it is posted externally. I don't know how seniority would work for an out of country applicant though. What I will say is that right now, as in the UK, there is a shortage of nurses. My facility has multiple open lines, though if you look online, not all are posted for some strange reason. We have seen a number of staff move to the community as there has recently been an expansion of those services. Because of the job posting process, people already working in IHA will have first access to community jobs, and I would argue fewer of them sit open for long (if any), so being employed in any setting will greatly increase your chances. Casual work can mitigate the shift work if you don't like nights, but you have to work a set number of hours before being eligible to purchase benefits/pension (though the cost of benefits is refundable at year end). When you are ready, it may be useful to reach out to the IHA recruiter for your chosen area or you can look on the IHA website - room to grow - that also lists career opportunities. Worth noting, my relative works in my facility and worked as a metal health nurse in the UK in a psychiatric hospital, he says that the scope of practice here is less than he was used to in the UK, ie he does less for more money (pay is better here, though many people consider BC an expensive place to live in comparison). He moved over ten years ago and at that time IHA were actively recruiting IENs and so he had a job lined up before arrival, just had to sit the exam after landing. Those days are long gone, but I wonder if we may see a smoothing of the path for IENs in the near future as staffing shortages are a real issue here. Good luck in your journey.
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Old Apr 1st 2023, 12:41 pm
  #203  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Hi everyone, just an update... I finally have my nursing licence! (British UK adult nurse applicant)

- Applied to NNAS Jan 2021
- IELTS taken and passed may 2021
- NNAS report comparable Jan 2022

- Applied to CNO Jan 2022,
- CNO deemed me as comparable and allowed me to sit NCLEX without additional bridging Feb 2022

- Passed Jurisprudence exam Jan 2022.
- NCLEX attempt on May 2022 - Fail
- NCLEX exam attempt 2 Feb 2023 - Pass
- CNO sent confirmation of NCLEX pass march 2023
- RN title with restrictions added April 2023 - this means I can apply for jobs in Ontario but am not allowed to practice until I submit evidence of residency to CNO which is fine.


I have no idea how much it has cost me in total, I dread to think but it's in the thousands with postage, travel, NCLEX fees, IELTS fee, registration fee etc etc but I'm finally at the finish line, just the job offer then visa to go. let me know if you have any questions

J
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Old Apr 8th 2023, 10:29 am
  #204  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by JD1990 View Post
Hi everyone, just an update... I finally have my nursing licence! (British UK adult nurse applicant)

- Applied to NNAS Jan 2021
- IELTS taken and passed may 2021
- NNAS report comparable Jan 2022

- Applied to CNO Jan 2022,
- CNO deemed me as comparable and allowed me to sit NCLEX without additional bridging Feb 2022

- Passed Jurisprudence exam Jan 2022.
- NCLEX attempt on May 2022 - Fail
- NCLEX exam attempt 2 Feb 2023 - Pass
- CNO sent confirmation of NCLEX pass march 2023
- RN title with restrictions added April 2023 - this means I can apply for jobs in Ontario but am not allowed to practice until I submit evidence of residency to CNO which is fine.


I have no idea how much it has cost me in total, I dread to think but it's in the thousands with postage, travel, NCLEX fees, IELTS fee, registration fee etc etc but I'm finally at the finish line, just the job offer then visa to go. let me know if you have any questions

J
Congratulations
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Old Apr 8th 2023, 10:32 am
  #205  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by 7InBC View Post
Hi,
I'm from the UK, and live and work in BC as an RPN. But I studied for that qualification here, so am not great with the NNAS side of things, sorry.
What I can tell you is that you will only need to sit EITHER the NCLEX or the RPNC, not both. From a quick search of the BCNM site, once you have your NNAS assessment, you would apply for registration through the BCNM and they assess your eligibility to sit the licensing exam. Without creating a new account, I can't progress further through that process to tell you what it looks like.
From what I hear, the NCLEX is the harder exam, but there is a wealth of study information available both online and in book form. The RPNC recently moved to computer based testing in line with the NCLEX, and is offered three times per year. In my experience there are less specifically psych related study resources, but the one available from the RPNC itself gives a decent look of what the test look like.
Depending on your NNAS assessment, you may want to sit the NCLEX over the RPNC if eligible, as it greatly increases your options for employment, should you have difficulty finding work in mental health (right now, that definitely won't be a problem!) RNs can work pretty much anywhere, possibly needing to take some specialty courses after graduation, but RPNs are pretty much restricted to mental health wards and facilities or long term care or other specialist units. I guess it depends if you value flexibility in the future. Right now, in BC at least, RPNs are paid exactly the same as RNs whether degree for diploma educated.
In any event, I would recommend doing as much study prep as you can as regularly as you can, because believe me, your ability to answer test questions as per the Gold Standard deteriorates very quickly once we have lived experience and what we actually do in practice differs from he textbook answer.
Good luck in your journey.
PS, come work in Kamloops BC, we have a great tertiary mental health facility and great scenery!
That’s so good to know. Starting the process and I hope it works out. Will look into Kamloops when looking for a job 😊
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Old Yesterday, 9:05 pm
  #206  
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Default Re: UK nurse moving to Canada

Originally Posted by aja424 View Post
The unit/module which I've started has cost £300. The next two are around £400 each so just over £1000 in total. You only do one at a time so the cost is spread.
Does this have to be done inside Canada or can it be done online from UK?
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