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-   -   If not a teacher, then what? (https://britishexpats.com/forum/canada-56/if-not-teacher-then-what-728527/)

Des and Chris Aug 14th 2011 7:38 am

If not a teacher, then what?
 
I am constantly reading that teaching is almost impossible to rely on as a source of income in Canada.
This worries me somewhat as it's all I know, I went straight from school, straight to uni and straight into teaching.
Twenty years in and I'm the head teacher of a primary school in England and it's a job I love.
I have no worries about having to return to the classroom in Canada but this looks difficult in the current climate.
I'd be interested to hear from other teachers who have made the move as to success stories they have had either within education or where their teaching skills and knowledge have helped them to secure employment elsewhere.
There must be some success stories somewhere?
We intend to move to Canada next summer and Alberta, BC and Ontario are all still in the running, even after this years recce trip.

ann m Aug 14th 2011 4:25 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
I'm interested in your motivation to leave behind a career and position you love. :)

ExKiwilass Aug 14th 2011 4:36 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by ann m (Post 9558846)
I'm interested in your motivation to leave behind a career and position you love. :)


+1

Des and Chris Aug 14th 2011 5:55 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
Probably because I don't want to get old wondering what if, I realise it's a risk, but I am of the mindset what will be will be. I want to see if there is something different / better/ as good as out there and the holidays I have spent in Canada I have loved. A risk worth taking? I don't know. .... But I don't want to regret not ever knowing.
I do love my job and my school and that potentially is a huge personal wrench for me - not being involved with children and education.

Steve_P Aug 14th 2011 6:34 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by Des and Chris (Post 9558073)
I am constantly reading that teaching is almost impossible to rely on as a source of income in Canada.
This worries me somewhat as it's all I know, I went straight from school, straight to uni and straight into teaching.
Twenty years in and I'm the head teacher of a primary school in England and it's a job I love.
I have no worries about having to return to the classroom in Canada but this looks difficult in the current climate.
I'd be interested to hear from other teachers who have made the move as to success stories they have had either within education or where their teaching skills and knowledge have helped them to secure employment elsewhere.
There must be some success stories somewhere?
We intend to move to Canada next summer and Alberta, BC and Ontario are all still in the running, even after this years recce trip.

If you decide that Alberta is somewhere you'd like to live then I'd suggest a PM (Personal Message) to the originator of this thread might help.

http://britishexpats.com/forum/showthread.php?t=727240

As for actually getting a position that could be difficult. The Alberta government is currently underfunding education. Calgary Board of Education has recently had to reduce its teacher numbers by attrition and lay-offs. Other boards seem to be in similar positions although some rural boards seem to be fairing better.

JonboyE Aug 14th 2011 6:43 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
In BC it can also be easier and quicker to get teaching work if you are prepared to go to some of the more remote locations.

charlottyb Aug 14th 2011 6:48 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
Another option is working in a Private School. My kids go to a great private elementary school where there are a couple of British teachers. I understand it may be 'easier' to get in that way?

I am a Nurse, and for me the move was backwards as far as my career goes. But we didn't move to further my career, if you get what I mean?!

Des and Chris Aug 14th 2011 6:52 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by charlottyb (Post 9559040)
Another option is working in a Private School. My kids go to a great private elementary school where there are a couple of British teachers. I understand it may be 'easier' to get in that way?

I am a Nurse, and for me the move was backwards as far as my career goes. But we didn't move to further my career, if you get what I mean?!

I am considering the private school option and trawling their web sites. My partner is a nurse too and jobs look more optimistic for him in Alberta. His specialism is oncology and stroke research.

Steve_P Aug 14th 2011 6:55 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by Des and Chris (Post 9559044)
I am considering the private school option and trawling their web sites. My partner is a nurse too and jobs look more optimistic for him in Alberta. His specialism is oncology and stroke research.

To teach even in private schools in Alberta you would still have to be accredited by Alberta Education.

http://education.alberta.ca/teachers/certification.aspx

From the above website:

Please be aware of the following when completing an application for the Alberta Interim Professional Certificate and submitting documents to this Office:
Prior to commencement of employment in the Alberta school system (public, separate, private, charter, francophone, and band schools); a teacher must hold an Interim Professional Certificate or other valid Alberta teaching authority. It is the responsibility of the hiring school authority and individual teacher to ensure that a teacher does not teach in an Alberta classroom before holding valid teaching authority

Oink Aug 14th 2011 7:42 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by Des and Chris (Post 9558975)
Probably because I don't want to get old wondering what if, I realise it's a risk, but I am of the mindset what will be will be. I want to see if there is something different / better/ as good as out there and the holidays I have spent in Canada I have loved. A risk worth taking? I don't know. .... But I don't want to regret not ever knowing.
I do love my job and my school and that potentially is a huge personal wrench for me - not being involved with children and education.



Not trying to be flippant but you don't want to regret it if you do it. I've known a few teachers that have given up headships in the UK only to have to do crap jobs over here or the US, have then become too entrenched, isolated and impoverished to ever go back. Then of course there's the pension issue. I'd stick with either holidays, a sabbatical or try a job swap for six months or a year.

RubyRose Aug 14th 2011 8:04 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by Des and Chris (Post 9558975)
Probably because I don't want to get old wondering what if, I realise it's a risk, but I am of the mindset what will be will be. I want to see if there is something different / better/ as good as out there and the holidays I have spent in Canada I have loved. A risk worth taking? I don't know. .... But I don't want to regret not ever knowing.
I do love my job and my school and that potentially is a huge personal wrench for me - not being involved with children and education.

:thumbup:

Dear Des and Chris,

I am a teacher in BC and I made the move to Canada in September 2009 for very similar reasons as yours. Four months after arriving in the lower mainland I was hired by SD43 - I was interviewed and hired on the spot. I taught in inner city secondary schools in the UK prior to my arrival. Initially I was hired on a part time continuing contract, however this academic year (2011 /12) I will be on a full time continuing contract.

Please contact me through PM and I will share further. All school districts in the lower mainland have a huge shortage in kindergarten (which comes under elementary, an area you are familiar with) and if you are bilingual i.e. competent to a fairly high level in both English and French, you stand a good chance of landing a job in French immersion. The BC supreme court found in favour of the British Columbia Teachers Federation that bills 27 and 28 which deals with class size, composition etc was unconstitutional and that it infringed on teachers rights, now this will create a situation necessitating corrections in these imbalances which would shift the balance towards hiring well qualified experienced teachers especially in the early years and special needs. This is part of the discourse in the current strike we are involved in.

Take care
Ruby

Oink Aug 14th 2011 8:42 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by RubyRose (Post 9559164)
:thumbup:

Dear Des and Chris,

I am a teacher in BC and I made the move to Canada in September 2009 for very similar reasons as yours. Four months after arriving in the lower mainland I was hired by SD43 - I was interviewed and hired on the spot. I taught in inner city secondary schools in the UK prior to my arrival. Initially I was hired on a part time continuing contract, however this academic year (2011 /12) I will be on a full time continuing contract.

Please contact me through PM and I will share further. All school districts in the lower mainland have a huge shortage in kindergarten (which comes under elementary, an area you are familiar with) and if you are bilingual i.e. competent to a fairly high level in both English and French, you stand a good chance of landing a job in French immersion. The BC supreme court found in favour of the British Columbia Teachers Federation that bills 27 and 28 which deals with class size, composition etc was unconstitutional and that it infringed on teachers rights, now this will create a situation necessitating corrections in these imbalances which would shift the balance towards hiring well qualified experienced teachers especially in the early years and special needs. This is part of the discourse in the current strike we are involved in.

Take care
Ruby

My guess is that you're a high school teacher with a speciality. As with the UK, employment is not too bad if you're a modern language specialist but the situation at the elementary level in BC is extremely over saturated, we turn out teachers here in droves.

And good luck with that strike of yours. There are some surprises in store for the BCTF if they think they'll garner public support in this economic environment.

ExKiwilass Aug 14th 2011 9:19 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
I agree with Oink. The BCTF can get f88ked if they think anyone supports their desire for even more $$$ and yet again, threatening strike action right int time for September - nice. Holding parents, and children, hostage yet again. Oh, and how about getting rid of bad teachers while they're at it? Oh no, that would never do. Teachers are never wrong and must be protected at all costs! :rolleyes:

I wish the BCTF were disbanded, honestly. It was needed in the past, now it's hard to see it as anything but an organization out to protect itself and it's members, not the interests of children.

ExKiwilass Aug 14th 2011 9:21 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 

Originally Posted by RubyRose (Post 9559164)
:thumbup:

Dear Des and Chris,

I am a teacher in BC and I made the move to Canada in September 2009 for very similar reasons as yours. Four months after arriving in the lower mainland I was hired by SD43 - I was interviewed and hired on the spot. I taught in inner city secondary schools in the UK prior to my arrival. Initially I was hired on a part time continuing contract, however this academic year (2011 /12) I will be on a full time continuing contract.

Please contact me through PM and I will share further. All school districts in the lower mainland have a huge shortage in kindergarten (which comes under elementary, an area you are familiar with) and if you are bilingual i.e. competent to a fairly high level in both English and French, you stand a good chance of landing a job in French immersion. The BC supreme court found in favour of the British Columbia Teachers Federation that bills 27 and 28 which deals with class size, composition etc was unconstitutional and that it infringed on teachers rights, now this will create a situation necessitating corrections in these imbalances which would shift the balance towards hiring well qualified experienced teachers especially in the early years and special needs. This is part of the discourse in the current strike we are involved in.

Take care
Ruby

Teacher's rights?

How about children's rights?

And the BCTF wonders why it is losing support.

Des and Chris Aug 14th 2011 10:45 pm

Re: If not a teacher, then what?
 
Ruby

We will be in touch via pm..... We have 101 questions (well not quite that many) and are interested in your experience.

Speak soon

Des


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