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Canada's vacation politics

Canada's vacation politics

Old Sep 14th 2017, 5:25 pm
  #196  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by dbd33 View Post
As long as there are kebabs, the infrastructure is the equal of that in the UK.
Agreed! And there is always the added bonus of the donair pizza with donair sauce, Maritimes style...
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Old Sep 14th 2017, 5:27 pm
  #197  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by h35j34 View Post

I do agree that moving to one city and then traveling to other cities there isn't much point as they are pretty much the same. However arriving new to Canada I'd like to visit few other places, but I guess this could be included in a trip before settling down for work etc.
This remark reminded me of the time when we first left the UK in 1977 on the way to a post-doc job near Los Angeles. Being effectively impoverished, despite being well qualified, we took advantage of the £50 one way airfare to New York offered by Laker Airways and of a two week student rail pass on Amtrak for a bit less than that in dollars.

We travelled from NY to Washington DC, to New Orleans and then on (with a few stops) to LA.

I can't recommend any better way to enlighten a UK newbie to North America about the gobsmacking vastness of the place (and this from someone who had hitchhiked all over Europe and even in parts of North Africa in the previous 7 years or so).
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Old Sep 14th 2017, 8:53 pm
  #198  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by dbd33 View Post
But the Victorian semi had stood for a century and is likely still there now. Even if you patch up the NS house every ten years or so when the shingles crack and blow off it's only good for fifty years or so. It seems to me that, when comparing houses that last for hundreds of years with those that last less than a lifetime, it's perverse to claim better quality for the throwaway ones.

our little house is built of wood, with vinyl siding, warm in winter and cool in summer (without air conditioning .......... and it is already over 70 years old

There are many houses all over Canada built of wood and well over 100 years old.

Another fallacy exploded!


Just like brick houses, a wood houses will last for many generations as long as it is well looked after!
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Old Sep 14th 2017, 8:58 pm
  #199  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Novocastrian reminds me .................


crossing Canada by train takes 6 days, only 1 night of which is spent in a hotel .... and is a fantastic way to understand the vastness of this country, and how small is the population.

I agree that crossing either the US or Canada by train is a great way to see either country.
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Old Sep 15th 2017, 12:42 am
  #200  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by scilly View Post
our little house is built of wood, with vinyl siding, warm in winter and cool in summer (without air conditioning .......... and it is already over 70 years old

There are many houses all over Canada built of wood and well over 100 years old.

Another fallacy exploded!


Just like brick houses, a wood houses will last for many generations as long as it is well looked after!
I wouldn't go exploding fallacies indoors in Canada, you'll be buried in a pile of sticks, drywall and plastic siding, like a trailer park after a tornado.
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Old Sep 16th 2017, 3:57 pm
  #201  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by dbd33 View Post
America has loads of different places to visit but it's expensive to fly there from Canada so, if exploring is the aim, I'd choose to live in Canada as close as possible to a US airport so as to be able to take a bus to it and fly from there. In this context living in Hamilton or Windsor suddenly makes sense.
Can't speak for Windsor/DTW but from what I understand, flights out of hub airports can be more expensive than tacking on a connector flight in to the hub for then taking said same flight.

The thing about the dead cheap flights out of BUF/ROC is that they are the very early ones - but you can work this in your favour by driving down the night before, airport hotel (get them to match the cheapest parking rate you can find if there aren't any park'n'fly deals - but these usually aren't cost-effective for weekend/week-long trips). It also means more time at your destination, so you can make the most of a long weekend trip.
Airport hotels around BUF are a very good way to use hotel points (and a good reason to churn hotel credit cards in particular).

This approach isn't for everyone (which is why there's such a premium on direct flights with nice timings), but if you can make it work for you it's a great way to do trips on the cheap and make the most of your time at your destination.

Weirdly, sometimes it can be cheaper to fly to/from the US in and out of YYZ - not always, but depending on your location and circumstances (i.e. if you have a Nexus card - YYZ transborder can be brutal otherwise) prices can be pretty close to make the schlep across the border not worth the additional expense.

The nice thing about Hamilton in this instance is that you can get the YYZ in 45 mins, and BUF 60-75 mins depending on what side of the city you're starting from (assuming you have Nexus and the line isn't going across the Peace Bridge - Whirlpool is a safe bet for lines, but longer drive time).

The other way to maximize exploring US cities is to play with google flights and see if you can engineer long layovers (i.e. less than 24 hours - more, and it's a stopover and can cost more, although not always). Depends on the city, but some have great transit links to where you want to explore, and lots of competition for well priced hotels. Or, if you're flying further afield, early start flight to a hub, have a day trip, and then sleep on the red-eye - we've had a day exploring Philly and overnights in Boston before going on to Europe, for example.
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Old Sep 17th 2017, 12:33 am
  #202  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

Originally Posted by bgpz View Post
Can't speak for Windsor/DTW but from what I understand, flights out of hub airports can be more expensive than tacking on a connector flight in to the hub for then taking said same flight.

The thing about the dead cheap flights out of BUF/ROC is that they are the very early ones - but you can work this in your favour by driving down the night before, airport hotel (get them to match the cheapest parking rate you can find if there aren't any park'n'fly deals - but these usually aren't cost-effective for weekend/week-long trips). It also means more time at your destination, so you can make the most of a long weekend trip.
Airport hotels around BUF are a very good way to use hotel points (and a good reason to churn hotel credit cards in particular).

This approach isn't for everyone (which is why there's such a premium on direct flights with nice timings), but if you can make it work for you it's a great way to do trips on the cheap and make the most of your time at your destination.

Weirdly, sometimes it can be cheaper to fly to/from the US in and out of YYZ - not always, but depending on your location and circumstances (i.e. if you have a Nexus card - YYZ transborder can be brutal otherwise) prices can be pretty close to make the schlep across the border not worth the additional expense.

The nice thing about Hamilton in this instance is that you can get the YYZ in 45 mins, and BUF 60-75 mins depending on what side of the city you're starting from (assuming you have Nexus and the line isn't going across the Peace Bridge - Whirlpool is a safe bet for lines, but longer drive time).

The other way to maximize exploring US cities is to play with google flights and see if you can engineer long layovers (i.e. less than 24 hours - more, and it's a stopover and can cost more, although not always). Depends on the city, but some have great transit links to where you want to explore, and lots of competition for well priced hotels. Or, if you're flying further afield, early start flight to a hub, have a day trip, and then sleep on the red-eye - we've had a day exploring Philly and overnights in Boston before going on to Europe, for example.
I bow to the depth of analysis here. All I can be bother to do is to add up the cost of the flight and the cost of the parking ($25/day in Toronto, $4/day in Detroit) and take the cheapest one. Buffalo is an attractive airport because it's small and because the surrounding hotels offer free parking with one night's stay. Drive to Buffalo, check into the Holiday Inn, go for wings; it's like you're already on vacation.

Oh, one neat thing about flying back to Buffalo is the sense of passenger solidarity. They've all seen "Once Upon a Time in America", they know people not going to Buffalo are laughing at them. Appropriately, last time around, the plane announcements were in broad scouse.

Last edited by dbd33; Sep 17th 2017 at 12:37 am.
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Old Sep 17th 2017, 3:09 am
  #203  
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Default Re: Canada's vacation politics

I'll typically use Bellingham,WA or Seattle when flying. The past 2 times though the fare was YVR was the same in CAD$ as the fares from Seattle but in US$ so YVR it was

As long as you don't fly into YVR in the 10am to 3pm time frame customs wait are minimal.
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