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Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

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Old Jan 10th 2018, 11:09 pm
  #46  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
I doubt too many would say life was better now rather than last century.
Half seem to think so.

Half of Australians think life is better now than it was in the Swinging Sixties - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
The con trick being played out would be close to a generation old. Work to you drop in order to pay off inflated hose prices, a pension that guarantees the most basic of living standards, ever higher costs in education for their kids, yet of declining standard, a government that wanted to cease the dole for all under thirty, more costs for parents if in that situation......It goes on of course.
Bunnings does a wide range of hoses and even has one to suit your insufficient budget.

Pensions in Australia support the most basic of living and more. If you want, you can even dabble in pensions and super. Its enough to pay the annual golf club membership and the beers down the lawn bowls club. That's a pretty good life for a retiree and well beyond the basics.

McDonalds pays more than the dole. They are always looking for staff. If you can work in McD's you don't need the dole.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
They are after the money of the majority to reward themselves in the most basic of terms. (I can explain it in great detail, but you are a poor student)
OK I am all ears.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
On top of that you label the masses being coned 'entitlement' .....amazing.
No just you.
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Old Jan 10th 2018, 11:16 pm
  #47  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
It is perfectly clear. Far removed from being mumbo jumbo. It on the contrary further supports what economists and social commentators have been stating for some time. The rich are getting richer. Vastly so in many instances while the rest go backwards.
The obvious conclusion is that there is a need to rebalance the taxation, such that the taxation on assets increases to make the rate of return less than that of GDP activities - so you can't just sit on it.

And that is required to be global, so there is no way to escape. Obviously with some asset classes (eg land and property) that's easier than others.

So the need is a type of globalisation where instead of zero import tarrifs and free movement of money, there is equality of how tax is setup so there's no escape route. Globalisation 2.0

And that means asking the turkeys to vote for christmas - it's not going to happen, and certainly not this side of automation doing it's slash and burn (which also needs to be addressed)

What it seems to be all pointing towards is a new political ideology; not unrestrained capitalism, not socialism, but something focused on the global scale, shared benefits as well as reward for personal achievement, and not growth centric (eg less role for interest). When you think about it, we are overdue a new binding model and ideology...
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Old Jan 10th 2018, 11:22 pm
  #48  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by GarryP View Post
The obvious conclusion is that there is a need to rebalance the taxation, such that the taxation on assets increases to make the rate of return less than that of GDP activities - so you can't just sit on it.

And that is required to be global, so there is no way to escape. Obviously with some asset classes (eg land and property) that's easier than others.

So the need is a type of globalisation where instead of zero import tarrifs and free movement of money, there is equality of how tax is setup so there's no escape route. Globalisation 2.0

And that means asking the turkeys to vote for christmas - it's not going to happen, and certainly not this side of automation doing it's slash and burn (which also needs to be addressed)

What it seems to be all pointing towards is a new political ideology; not unrestrained capitalism, not socialism, but something focused on the global scale, shared benefits as well as reward for personal achievement, and not growth centric (eg less role for interest). When you think about it, we are overdue a new binding model and ideology...
Good to see you looking at this from a political global level rather than an "attack the corporation" level.

The EU recently gave this a crack.

https://www.icij.org/investigations/paradise-papers/bermuda-luxembourg-new-eu-blacklist-omits-major-tax-havens/
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Old Jan 10th 2018, 11:45 pm
  #49  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
Half seem to think so.

Half of Australians think life is better now than it was in the Swinging Sixties - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)



Bunnings does a wide range of hoses and even has one to suit your insufficient budget.

Pensions in Australia support the most basic of living and more. If you want, you can even dabble in pensions and super. Its enough to pay the annual golf club membership and the beers down the lawn bowls club. That's a pretty good life for a retiree and well beyond the basics.

McDonalds pays more than the dole. They are always looking for staff. If you can work in McD's you don't need the dole.



OK I am all ears.



No just you.
Oh I thought you'd gone away on your annual jaunt to the ski fields of Europe, joining the tens of thousands Europeans, whom consider it a normal season turn of events, and certainly nothing very special.


Glad you decided to abstain this year. A lot of rather nasty accidents happen to novices whom attempt to out perform their actual ability with a pair of skies.


A bit like bean counters and home economics I suppose. Now who said anyone that allowed me a golf membership, I wouldn't want to be a member? Food for thought with the eagerness to impress.


Now what was your line again? Rather convoluted and not the easiest to understand. A bit of rational argument after refection of the position really should be the order of the day. I se you try hard to be part of the Jonathon's I discussed on another thread. Perhaps you'll get there although the sense of 'elan' remains rather lacking.
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Old Jan 11th 2018, 12:39 am
  #50  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Oh I thought you'd gone away on your annual jaunt to the ski fields of Europe, joining the tens of thousands Europeans, whom consider it a normal season turn of events, and certainly nothing very special.


Glad you decided to abstain this year. A lot of rather nasty accidents happen to novices whom attempt to out perform their actual ability with a pair of skies.
Europe in January. No thanks. Apart from being the most horrible time of the European year there isn't enough base snow down. Early March is when I go. Plenty of base, still good snow coming through and the sun is out.

But joining tens of thousands of Europeans, Australians, Americans and an ever increasing number of Asians is testament to how the quality of life is improving for all. Only something available to a very few last century.

You keep tripping over your message about quality of life.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post

A bit like bean counters and home economics I suppose. Now who said anyone that allowed me a golf membership, I wouldn't want to be a member? Food for thought with the eagerness to impress.

Now what was your line again? Rather convoluted and not the easiest to understand. A bit of rational argument after refection of the position really should be the order of the day. I se you try hard to be part of the Jonathon's I discussed on another thread. Perhaps you'll get there although the sense of 'elan' remains rather lacking.
Like the old retirees on the golf course and at lawn bowls I am just one of the many regular people who like nice things and are prepared to work to get it.

You on the other hand are peddling a message about getting it all for nothing.

Its not rocket science why your quality of life has gone down hill. Everyone else's is going up.
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Old Jan 11th 2018, 9:18 am
  #51  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
Europe in January. No thanks. Apart from being the most horrible time of the European year there isn't enough base snow down. Early March is when I go. Plenty of base, still good snow coming through and the sun is out.

But joining tens of thousands of Europeans, Australians, Americans and an ever increasing number of Asians is testament to how the quality of life is improving for all. Only something available to a very few last century.

You keep tripping over your message about quality of life.



Like the old retirees on the golf course and at lawn bowls I am just one of the many regular people who like nice things and are prepared to work to get it.

You on the other hand are peddling a message about getting it all for nothing.

Its not rocket science why your quality of life has gone down hill. Everyone else's is going up.
Blinkers off a few deep breaths and reflect on life around. Trying not to be so smug and self satisfied mat be of assistance as well.


Good snow in March can be a gamble. My life quality is not the issue. Having had a holiday house in the French Alps on going in summers as well, as only an hours drive away, all old hat and not that impressive.
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Old Jan 11th 2018, 10:17 am
  #52  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Blinkers off a few deep breaths and reflect on life around. Trying not to be so smug and self satisfied mat be of assistance as well.
I really thought I was Mr Average until I read your ramblings, then for a minute I thought I was well above average. Then reality bit and I realised something went seriously wrong with your assessment of life. Back to reality and Mr Average for me.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Good snow in March can be a gamble. My life quality is not the issue. Having had a holiday house in the French Alps on going in summers as well, as only an hours drive away, all old hat and not that impressive.
Sounds lovely, but how did you lose that holiday house in France and everything else? Do tell. It might explain the resentment.
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Old Jan 19th 2018, 6:59 am
  #53  
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
I really thought I was Mr Average until I read your ramblings, then for a minute I thought I was well above average. Then reality bit and I realised something went seriously wrong with your assessment of life. Back to reality and Mr Average for me.



Sounds lovely, but how did you lose that holiday house in France and everything else? Do tell. It might explain the resentment.


When you stop attempting to impress. self realisation may become apparent. One thing that clearly shines out is that you do want to be, nor thought of as Mr Average. Far from it. It is usually people of a' humble' back ground that concern themselves with the posing of such a question.


To answer part of your question nothing was 'lost' , people move on and non portable ties with Europe remain in place.
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Old Jan 20th 2018, 3:25 am
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
Europe in January. No thanks. Apart from being the most horrible time of the European year there isn't enough base snow down. Early March is when I go. Plenty of base, still good snow coming through and the sun is out.
Spring skiing. Touring in VIC or NSW in late August is often great after a big dump - longer days.

I did ski in Italy once in April and it was a bit crap - still the price reflected that.

My downhill interest is waning but my touring interest is gaining and gaining.
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Old Jan 22nd 2018, 8:45 am
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Default Re: Australia’s Economy is a House of Cards

Originally Posted by BadgeIsBack View Post
Spring skiing. Touring in VIC or NSW in late August is often great after a big dump - longer days.

I did ski in Italy once in April and it was a bit crap - still the price reflected that.

My downhill interest is waning but my touring interest is gaining and gaining.
I remember many years ago skiing in Canada in May. 2 days before close of season. Knee high powder and a 4 metre base.
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