90's born Aus Kids.

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Old Jan 18th 2018, 2:43 am
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Default 90's born Aus Kids.

I've basically got two generations of kids, with a ten-year gap between the 2nd oldest and my 3rd oldest child.

There is a massive difference in their outlook. I'm just wondering if anyone else is noticing this with their young adults/ late teen kids.

They seem to be turning away from Europe and the US in droves in their outlook and fully taking on closer ties with Asia. One of the factors in this is my just about to turn 20YO son and his mates. All of them have Japan or China as their No1 go-to destinations, they are not really interested in anything European... Save for East European and German Techno... Which apparently is usurped currently by the techno scene and fashions in Japan and Korea.

Another factor with these youngsters is how interested they are in food, and I mean good food.... No fast food for them, it's real authentic ethnic food they seem to be after, or they make it themselves. That's another factor all the boys cook and they cook well.

Just wondering whether this is an Inner Melbourne bubble that's happening or it's countrywide? Or it could be a trend that's going to happen countrywide.

Certainly very different to the 80's born kids, that's for sure.... Very definitely not primarily European or US orientated anymore.

My 19yo son is off to Japan on the 4th of Feb, on his lonesome, he is following the large wave of kids that he knows that have all done similar things. He's taking an empty suitcase and coming back with 40kg's of records he reckons.

Blimey!
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Old Jan 18th 2018, 3:10 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Perhaps more mainstream than past. Don't forget many Aussie kids, along with western kids, from especially Germany and France, some USA and UK, took off across Asia in the sixties and seventies, on a different trail, one far less trodden, as things Indian/Nepalese /Afghani/ Iranian down to Thailand became vogue. I expect the talk was very similar back then, as tens of thousands under took the Hippy Trail.


Asia is pretty much mainstream these days. I have over the past decade plus come across loads of Aussies both young and not so young relocating to Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, Korea, in the main to work. China very common to visit in recent times.( I think many of those had at least visited Europe, if not worked.) The Bamboo Curtain kept it closed in distant times.


You will still find loads of Aussies in London. Just far more choice now and less doing unskilled work than decades back.


I guess Asia has certainly picked up in numbers working and visiting but not to the exclusion of North America and/or Europe.


As Asia increasingly dominates the Australian landscape I expect far more interaction within the region. Perhaps with the inclusion for Asian languages as well. Something that sadly went into decline this century.
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Old Jan 18th 2018, 7:40 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

When they think enter the dragon is software code its a generational gap.
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Old Jan 19th 2018, 6:49 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

There was a decline in Asian studies during the nineties, when the dreadful Howard Conservative government cut funding for the teaching of Asian languages at school.


A very regressive step as well as reducing other important ties like Radio Australia to Asian regions.


At university level Chinese language studies are principally undertaken by those of Chinese ethnicity. Hence hardly a lot of evidence there.


Although more can use chop sticks these days and travel to Asia, there is a considerable amount of work still needed to make Australians Asian literate, IMO.
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Old Jan 20th 2018, 2:36 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Found out the term for them..... Gen Z's This lot is very different. Fewer property aspirations, Less long-term job aspirations, more likely to be self-employed or start businesses, able to go with the flow. Anti Facebook, far more caring about their friends and associates. Very accepting of other cultures. Fewer Selfies, good with handling money, happy to wear second-hand clothes. Great Cooks.

Looks like the best generation in decades to me.
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Old Jan 20th 2018, 10:07 pm
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by ozzieeagle View Post
Found out the term for them..... Gen Z's This lot is very different. Fewer property aspirations, Less long-term job aspirations, more likely to be self-employed or start businesses, able to go with the flow. Anti Facebook, far more caring about their friends and associates. Very accepting of other cultures. Fewer Selfies, good with handling money, happy to wear second-hand clothes. Great Cooks.

Looks like the best generation in decades to me.



Although a less material outlook, was largely a result of it being forced on them. Do you agree? House prices beyond the reach of many, or at least a very hefty price to be paid if undertaken. As for jobs, well so ,many only on casual contracts, along with degrees not being an entry into a dream job anymore.


I agree with the acceptance of other cultures more so, something I mention myself.


While Facebook is wanning, 'old hat' so hardly unsurprising they are still 'very connected' to social media.
I have certainly not come across fewer of the dreaded selfies. Good with handling money, probably very debateable.


More inclined to want 'to fit in' compared to segments at least of my generation. Not as questioning nor very politically inclined either, I am not sure I find a lot of difference, but the 'time' is certainly different, something I have noticed over twelve years, with a movement away from housing debt and more 'freelancing' abroad, for those with the skills to do so.


The recent 'tampering' with superannuation appears to be bearing results with more First Home Buyers entering the market. Which kind of supports my point.


But I sincerely hope they are different in a true sense and question the world they will be increasingly influencing...
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Old Jan 20th 2018, 10:55 pm
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
More inclined to want 'to fit in' compared to segments at least of my generation. Not as questioning nor very politically inclined either,
I think social media has made them much more concerned with their public persona - to the extent of culling from their lives anything which doesn't fit with that constructed persona. Problem is, its a copied persona - derived from others. They tend not to be original or cognitive in their own right. They parrot - which then means they are passive in a real social sense (eg politics), they do as they are told.

All of which is a big problem going forward, where innovation and new concepts will be prized and where reproducing what others have done first will be left to the automation.

Aus has always been poor in this regard, with only very occasional flashing of creators moving beyond pastiche - but it's going to really hurt going forward.
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Old Jan 21st 2018, 3:04 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by GarryP View Post
I think social media has made them much more concerned with their public persona - to the extent of culling from their lives anything which doesn't fit with that constructed persona. Problem is, its a copied persona - derived from others. They tend not to be original or cognitive in their own right. They parrot - which then means they are passive in a real social sense (eg politics), they do as they are told.

All of which is a big problem going forward, where innovation and new concepts will be prized and where reproducing what others have done first will be left to the automation.

Aus has always been poor in this regard, with only very occasional flashing of creators moving beyond pastiche - but it's going to really hurt going forward.


That would be my take exactly. Public persona as seen through social media. Always appear cool and not negative. Even if the world is crushing in around them. Nobody wants to read/hear the bad stuff....hence the adolescent grief and mental distress experienced alone. Not to mention the bullying experienced online.......
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Old Jan 21st 2018, 7:07 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
That would be my take exactly. Public persona as seen through social media. Always appear cool and not negative. Even if the world is crushing in around them. Nobody wants to read/hear the bad stuff....hence the adolescent grief and mental distress experienced alone. Not to mention the bullying experienced online.......
I think you and GarryP are overly negative, to be honest..there are real pressures - but I think we forget how resilient kids can be. There are real pitfalls yes, but not to ensnare all. I like to think that the internet and social media shares info which was previously restricted - that levels the field somewhat. I can remember in the mid 90s making decisions on the sum total of a single book I referenced in a library - now I could join any no of forums and google away..

The thing is though is that social media was soaring during their late teens so I don't see how mid-90s born kids completely escaped the pressures of social media.

If anything, its the current crop of mid-30s who avoided it, who are just getting established into their careers - Gen Y? they are the interesting ones with full access to info in a way the people in their mid-40s (Gen X) might not have had...they had full-use of social media to network and advance careers - not their adolescence - and are old enough to be scaling the ladder with work experience.

funny how people talk about Milennials (are these Y or Z?) and of late Gen X seen to get forgotten about between Gen Y.Z and Boomers. I sometimes think Gen X are Boomer-lite - the last to get into the property market and get some free tertiary education (if they made the right decisions). This generation is soon to inherit in the job stakes....

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Old Jan 22nd 2018, 5:14 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by BadgeIsBack View Post
I think you and GarryP are overly negative, to be honest..there are real pressures - but I think we forget how resilient kids can be. There are real pitfalls yes, but not to ensnare all. I like to think that the internet and social media shares info which was previously restricted - that levels the field somewhat. I can remember in the mid 90s making decisions on the sum total of a single book I referenced in a library - now I could join any no of forums and google away..

The thing is though is that social media was soaring during their late teens so I don't see how mid-90s born kids completely escaped the pressures of social media.

If anything, its the current crop of mid-30s who avoided it, who are just getting established into their careers - Gen Y? they are the interesting ones with full access to info in a way the people in their mid-40s (Gen X) might not have had...they had full-use of social media to network and advance careers - not their adolescence - and are old enough to be scaling the ladder with work experience.

funny how people talk about Milennials (are these Y or Z?) and of late Gen X seen to get forgotten about between Gen Y.Z and Boomers. I sometimes think Gen X are Boomer-lite - the last to get into the property market and get some free tertiary education (if they made the right decisions). This generation is soon to inherit in the job stakes....

Well not really. Resilience lies with the human spirit to carry on against the odds. That is age and gender unrelated. If anything, kids perhaps are more to the contrary , with a naivety that comes with youth and an eagerness to 'fit in'. Most would desire from my experience exactly what past generations found easier to obtain. That being house status and money, but events have scarpered plans for now for many.


Social media is a force for good and bad. Just as much crap can be sourced as useful info, don't see anything overly negative about airing reality.
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Old Jan 22nd 2018, 9:02 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Well not really. Resilience lies with the human spirit to carry on against the odds. That is age and gender unrelated. If anything, kids perhaps are more to the contrary , with a naivety that comes with youth and an eagerness to 'fit in'. Most would desire from my experience exactly what past generations found easier to obtain. That being house status and money, but events have scarpered plans for now for many.


Social media is a force for good and bad. Just as much crap can be sourced as useful info, don't see anything overly negative about airing reality.
I consult to a team of 20 somethings a day a week. They don't believe they will ever afford a house in a trendy hip area.

However they do believe they can afford an apartment in a not so hip area now.

Only a few have the foresight to do that.

This is no different to my generation or those before it.

Its called the property ladder.

Other than that they are quite happy souls with a very positive outlook on life. 3 took European holidays over Christmas, 2 went skiing in Japan. Life of the 20 something seems pretty good to me.
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Old Jan 22nd 2018, 10:26 am
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Default Re: 90's born Aus Kids.

Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
I consult to a team of 20 somethings a day a week. They don't believe they will ever afford a house in a trendy hip area.

However they do believe they can afford an apartment in a not so hip area now.

Only a few have the foresight to do that.

This is no different to my generation or those before it.

Its called the property ladder.

Other than that they are quite happy souls with a very positive outlook on life. 3 took European holidays over Christmas, 2 went skiing in Japan. Life of the 20 something seems pretty good to me.

I'm getting the prospect of them buying with their friends, or siblings, it's a distinct possibility in their eyes. Not just one of them suggesting this either. Property ownership not exactly high on the priority list. Whereas traveling and working overseas is.
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Old Jan 22nd 2018, 7:18 pm
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Originally Posted by ozzieeagle View Post
I'm getting the prospect of them buying with their friends, or siblings, it's a distinct possibility in their eyes. Not just one of them suggesting this either. Property ownership not exactly high on the priority list. Whereas traveling and working overseas is.
Yep. To be fair I remember when one of my mates bought an investment apartment when we were about 22. Then another one did. They were not great apartments and they weren't in great areas but their goal was to climb the property ladder as quickly as possible. The rest of us were too busy travelling and pissing our money up against the wall.

The apartment buyers never had the desire to travel. One of them got married to the first hotty that came along then lost his apartment in the expected divorce.

Each to their own but I firmly believe your 20's and even 30's is a time for life experiences. Some want to do that once they've paid off their houses and the kids are all grown up later in life but by then you have commitments, responsibilities and the body is just not a capable in keeping up as it was in your 20's.

Nothing is really different today. If you want to get on that property ladder young you can, like back then, it takes commitment and compromise and your first property is never going to be your last, thats why its called a property ladder.
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Old Feb 13th 2018, 5:49 am
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Well I agree with everything of the above post apart from the last paragraph. This times of easy leverage bur inflated product are hardly the formula of wise investment in most cases.
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Old Mar 2nd 2018, 11:41 pm
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An interesting thread. Shame it hasn't further developed. Or has all been said on the matter? Not long ago had two North European teenagers stay over with us, both boys, oldest nineteen other sixteen. I attempted to gauge a 'difference' both between them, though only a few years apart and Aussies their age. Although both have experienced a classical education, one plays the cello which he plays across borders in Europe, both realised his dream to play professionally is probably just that. His brother the older, was a registered ski instructor, was in his regions swimming team, both spoke three languages fluently, and one another less than fluent.
One intends to work in CH (Switzerland) as a teacher (great pay) other unsure if can't break into the music world.
Both very clothes and style conscious. They are educated to succeed one feels. Even so their music of choice while here was gangster rap type stuff, perhaps a show that they are attempting to display not being as conservative as lifestyle and education would otherwise suggest?
Both will inherit so little concern regarding property.


Hard to come to conclusions. Compared to my generation, these were a little 'spoiled" perhaps? No chance they'd stay in cheap $1 a night hostels on the road to Mandalay or Kathmandu, as I would have done. Straight into luxury hotels in Bali and other points abroad. High status girl friends that must 'fit the desired look' , yes somewhat different but hardly all inspiring.....to experience the best so young.......
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