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They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Australia

They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Australia

Old Jun 24th 2020, 1:55 pm
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by Amazulu View Post
I don't get involved in house price discussions on here as it's pointless but there is one undeniable fact about the place you live in - you either pay your own mortgage or you pay someone else's. Another point is that the state provided pension systems in Germany and other Western European countries are in structural trouble. Increased life expectancy and health outcomes means more old people taking more out of the pot, leaving less for the next generation. This, with a lack of property ownership as an asset, means that there's big problems being stored up. Countries that have a big private pension system and high levels of home ownership - UK, USA, Canada, Australia, Ireland, Netherlands etc - are in a much better long-term position
You are right and house price discussions make no sense. You either buy at the right time/sell at the right time or buy at the wrong time/sell at the wrong time and if you rent, you're paying someone else's mortgage. I just don't agree with this: many prefer renting not because they can't afford to purchase, just they don't see the need. Renting in Germany comes with protections, unimaginable in Australia. You are very right and a lack of property ownership will certainly cause many problems, which is already showing in Germany. Unless it's state owned social housing, you then end up with fewer landlords who own multiple properties and they can control the rental market. This is already the case in Germany and many pensioners can't afford the rent.

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Old Jun 25th 2020, 12:05 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by Moses2013 View Post
You are right and house price discussions make no sense. You either buy at the right time/sell at the right time or buy at the wrong time/sell at the wrong time and if you rent, you're paying someone else's mortgage. I just don't agree with this: many prefer renting not because they can't afford to purchase, just they don't see the need. Renting in Germany comes with protections, unimaginable in Australia. You are very right and a lack of property ownership will certainly cause many problems, which is already showing in Germany. Unless it's state owned social housing, you then end up with fewer landlords who own multiple properties and they can control the rental market. This is already the case in Germany and many pensioners can't afford the rent.
It wasn't me that said that BTW. Agree with your sentiment though
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Old Jun 26th 2020, 3:15 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by Moses2013 View Post
Sure but things have changed in Germany too and the high standards often only come into play when it's your own home + you have a population of 80 million. Germany is only cheap when you want an apartment and houses with decent land are only cheap if they are in the East, or places where unemployment is high. The Germans also have a contemporary taste, while the British seem to love everything old and the Irish unfortunately follow the same kind of taste. Most landlords here in Ireland seem to be farmers, so you know what you can expect and during the boom is was just a quick profit. Luckily the mentality is changing and now you see more heat pumps, less oil heaters and better window suppliers etc. I still wouldn't want to rent here but since we bought after the boom and have a good mix of German and Scandinavian fixtures that we put in, the standards as you say are better and we had enough cash left to do it. No doubt it all comes down to timing and there are good times and bad times.
Only partially true. It is true about contemporary taste and land having shot up in price, but still very possible to buy for a good price an older 'farmhouse' (very well built) in villages in Baden Württemberg in The South.(not really a farm, just title) Spotted one on the market just recently. Thing being the up keep for such houses can be enormous. Roof repairs alone a small fortune. We own two rental properties in the area and though costs around the rent have risen, the rent has only risen a little and does barely cover increased costs . That part of Germany, has a tradition of buying own property. The population are very thrifty with money and good at making it. A little 'alien' to other Germans in many things perhaps, especially in speech.

Actually that experience led my decision to not purchase in Berlin, what would have been a great deal in appreciation stakes but renting is so hit and miss. We are reasonably convinced foreign criminals inhabit one of the places. Police have broken down the door on one occasion after firearms reported on property. Nothing found. They remain there. Nothing we can do to get them out as rent always paid and rental protection laws in Germany do what thewy say on the package.
Not been back to Ireland for decades since the sale of the house on Lake Corrib, Co Galway. Odd I suppose in the sense that was purchased by a German woman artist. She would have done very well though with the substantial leap in prices not too long after.



The fact is investment in Real Estate has taken off in a large part due to so little on offer to place money for a return in Germany.
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Old Jun 26th 2020, 3:30 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by Amazulu View Post
I don't get involved in house price discussions on here as it's pointless but there is one undeniable fact about the place you live in - you either pay your own mortgage or you pay someone else's. Another point is that the state provided pension systems in Germany and other Western European countries are in structural trouble. Increased life expectancy and health outcomes means more old people taking more out of the pot, leaving less for the next generation. This, with a lack of property ownership as an asset, means that there's big problems being stored up. Countries that have a big private pension system and high levels of home ownership - UK, USA, Canada, Australia, Ireland, Netherlands etc - are in a much better long-term position
When houses are over priced and personal debt levels are at all times highs, it counters the usually given benefits of house ownership. The obscene price rises over recent times, have shackled a big per cent to life time and beyond debt or indeed excluded many from the market altogether.
There have already been' tampering' with most Western European social security and pension systems. No one can know how effective the Australian private system will prove longer term. A reliance on the stock market together with future government
interference' in getting 'their hands' on the money, may prove irresistible as we move into very uncertain times economically. Not to say the excessive fees charged in the process of private companies being spoon fed by government.
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Old Jun 28th 2020, 10:05 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Well, she's right about one thing, "flies are everywhere". I absolutely can't stand the bush flies, even though they don't bite, and would never consider living inland enough where they are a problem. It even bothers me to watch other people trying to ignore them on the TV news, when they crawl across people's faces.

And even worse are the midgies, near swampier parts of the coast.

However, Australian mosquitoes I can live with, even though after 15 years here I still get serious welts from their bites. They are sneakier (less noisy in flight) than North American mosquitoes, but they don't come in such numbers.

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Old Jun 28th 2020, 11:37 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by abner View Post
Well, she's right about one thing, "flies are everywhere". I absolutely can't stand the bush flies, even though they don't bite, and would never consider living inland enough where they are a problem. It even bothers me to watch other people trying to ignore them on the TV news, when they crawl across people's faces.

And even worse are the midgies, near swampier parts of the coast.

However, Australian mosquitoes I can live with, even though after 15 years here I still get serious welts from their bites. They are sneakier (less noisy in flight) than North American mosquitoes, but they don't come in such numbers.
Yep, sand flies are the worst.
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Old Jul 5th 2020, 6:27 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
German house prices have risen considerably in recent times. It depends where exactly in Germany. There are countless houses in villages, still to be found at decent rental prices. Many of those 'villages' would be classified as almost suburbs, in the Australian context.
German houses are built to a high standard as well. I have lived in Ireland (a new build in Co Galway)and found the places not at all built for the climate. Same goes for Australia. The real estate bubble, a result of the 'Celtic Boom' years, encouraged far to much investment into housing, which collapsed, but too few lessons apparently learnt.
Ireland is behind Germany, simply because they are a less advanced economic country.
Can you describe how new Irish houses were not built for the climate as the building code for housing aswell as in most of Europe would be among the highest in the world? I can't speak for Australia but for New Zealand which has the worst quality of housing for the climate i have ever experienced. The standards are so low here that having a home that is warm throughout is classed as a luxury rather than a standard. It's not even requirement for a building company to provide any heating in a newly built home, this in a country where in the bottom half of the South island regularly see's Freezing temperatures in winter. As for the real estate bubble and the Celtic Boom, those years have passed. Ireland is once against flourishing economically though like most of the west not everyone is benefiting from it leaving left wing Sinn Fein benefiting from the discontent. There has also in recent years been a drastic change to a high tech economy with the biggest industries now being ICT and Pharmaceutical so to call it less advanced would be incredible naive. Also you say few lessons have been learnt yet after the last recession in 2014 Ireland was the fastest growing economy in Europe, lessons were learnt not to return to the boom/bust days of the past. I wouldn't imagine Australia for the most part would need housing to be at the same standard in terms of insulation and heating as most of the populated areas rarely see the freezing temperatures common in most of Europe. Also it appears you get more bang for your buck especially in the likes of Perth.
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Old Jul 5th 2020, 6:53 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by paddy234 View Post
Can you describe how new Irish houses were not built for the climate as the building code for housing aswell as in most of Europe would be among the highest in the world? I can't speak for Australia but for New Zealand which has the worst quality of housing for the climate i have ever experienced. The standards are so low here that having a home that is warm throughout is classed as a luxury rather than a standard. It's not even requirement for a building company to provide any heating in a newly built home, this in a country where in the bottom half of the South island regularly see's Freezing temperatures in winter. As for the real estate bubble and the Celtic Boom, those years have passed. Ireland is once against flourishing economically though like most of the west not everyone is benefiting from it leaving left wing Sinn Fein benefiting from the discontent. There has also in recent years been a drastic change to a high tech economy with the biggest industries now being ICT and Pharmaceutical so to call it less advanced would be incredible naive. Also you say few lessons have been learnt yet after the last recession in 2014 Ireland was the fastest growing economy in Europe, lessons were learnt not to return to the boom/bust days of the past. I wouldn't imagine Australia for the most part would need housing to be at the same standard in terms of insulation and heating as most of the populated areas rarely see the freezing temperatures common in most of Europe. Also it appears you get more bang for your buck especially in the likes of Perth.
Well new build in Co Galway was forever damp. We had no central heating but relied on wood fire for warmth. This was last century so have standards improved? My impression was the over building, during the 'boom' years, involved a lot of very dodgy builds,.
I note Irish real estate has increased considerably in value, recapturing much of the loss when the market crashed. Has it learnt from past excesses? I'm not on the ground so not in a position to state from personal experience, but know a number of Irish, who
hold grave doubts for the continued health of the economy.

I am aware that Sinn Fein is polling well in Ireland. On both sides of the border, as I gather. A break of the old two party system would likely really shake up Irish politics. Perhaps what is needed? Although I leave that country's politics to others, with a more direct interest,
as well as greater understanding to arrive at a conclusion. I long ago learned to stay well aware from Irish politics.

Australian houses, in my opinion are rather poorly built on too many occasions. Especially with the price expectation. I have looked over the years at many, many dozens. I know from others the standard of New Zealand houses is very poor. Especially in relation to warmth.
In Australia, too many houses are built as if Australia is a country of eternal heat. Believe me the temperature does fall in winter and many houses are ill built for cold winter months.
I have read on forums, as this, that a number of Brit's have found it surprisingly cold, more so than they felt in England, where houses are generally more suited to colder conditions.






More to cash in on the housing frenzy of the time and making money. Perhaps my standards were too high after experiencing housing in the German market and French previously.
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Old Jul 5th 2020, 7:21 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Well new build in Co Galway was forever damp. We had no central heating but relied on wood fire for warmth. This was last century so have standards improved? My impression was the over building, during the 'boom' years, involved a lot of very dodgy builds,.
I note Irish real estate has increased considerably in value, recapturing much of the loss when the market crashed. Has it learnt from past excesses? I'm not on the ground so not in a position to state from personal experience, but know a number of Irish, who
hold grave doubts for the continued health of the economy.

I am aware that Sinn Fein is polling well in Ireland. On both sides of the border, as I gather. A break of the old two party system would likely really shake up Irish politics. Perhaps what is needed? Although I leave that country's politics to others, with a more direct interest,
as well as greater understanding to arrive at a conclusion. I long ago learned to stay well aware from Irish politics.

Australian houses, in my opinion are rather poorly built on too many occasions. Especially with the price expectation. I have looked over the years at many, many dozens. I know from others the standard of New Zealand houses is very poor. Especially in relation to warmth.
In Australia, too many houses are built as if Australia is a country of eternal heat. Believe me the temperature does fall in winter and many houses are ill built for cold winter months.
I have read on forums, as this, that a number of Brit's have found it surprisingly cold, more so than they felt in England, where houses are generally more suited to colder conditions.






More to cash in on the housing frenzy of the time and making money. Perhaps my standards were too high after experiencing housing in the German market and French previously.
Well it being last century i can't say as i was too young though in all my years of living there until 2013 i never knew of anyone living in new housing where central heating wasn't a standard or any housing built where it wasn't standard. I do remember much older homes being more damp and cold though they were built before the era of double Glazing and central heating which became widely adopted in the 1980s. In actual fact going home in Christmas 2018 i felt houses were too hot lol, people have their central heating cranked way up. I remember walking down Dublin high street with the temperature being 4 degrees wearing a thick jacket and as soon as we walked into a store or home we had to take it off as within seconds as we were sweating. I have completely acclimatized to the point where i never noticed the significant temperature difference between indoor and outdoor as i did when i went home. Seeing people still wearing woolly jumpers in hot restaurants and pubs just blew us away, we obviously weren't used to having such well heated homes even in winter. I have made sure mine is however like i said most people here think that is a luxury and to talk about it would make one appear that they are bragging lol.

As for Australia, i suppose if you acclimatize to a regular temperature of 30-35 degrees in the summer then 7-10 degrees at night in winter would feel very cold. I don't think most people in the UK and Ireland understand that, i feel it's the issue that hurts this side of the world most, all good in the summer but they consistently don't build houses well for winter, standards need to change. The amount of damp homes leading to respiratory problems is disgraceful
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Old Jul 5th 2020, 7:46 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by paddy234 View Post
Well it being last century i can't say as i was too young though in all my years of living there until 2013 i never knew of anyone living in new housing where central heating wasn't a standard or any housing built where it wasn't standard. I do remember much older homes being more damp and cold though they were built before the era of double Glazing and central heating which became widely adopted in the 1980s. In actual fact going home in Christmas 2018 i felt houses were too hot lol, people have their central heating cranked way up. I remember walking down Dublin high street with the temperature being 4 degrees wearing a thick jacket and as soon as we walked into a store or home we had to take it off as within seconds as we were sweating. I have completely acclimatized to the point where i never noticed the significant temperature difference between indoor and outdoor as i did when i went home. Seeing people still wearing woolly jumpers in hot restaurants and pubs just blew us away, we obviously weren't used to having such well heated homes even in winter. I have made sure mine is however like i said most people here think that is a luxury and to talk about it would make one appear that they are bragging lol.

As for Australia, i suppose if you acclimatize to a regular temperature of 30-35 degrees in the summer then 7-10 degrees at night in winter would feel very cold. I don't think most people in the UK and Ireland understand that, i feel it's the issue that hurts this side of the world most, all good in the summer but they consistently don't build houses well for winter, standards need to change. The amount of damp homes leading to respiratory problems is disgraceful

It was late eighties. I assumed most places were the same. The smell of burning peat dominated the early mornings especially. Most seemed to go to the pub, I assumed to keep warm besides the craic. Like I mentioned, I have heard with some repletion, some questionable builds ,
going up during the 'boom' when real estate went crazy.
Actually you may be surprised to learn that the night temperature can drop down to 3 degrees and early mornings in winter can be extremely cold. But winter, usually only lasts about three months. Hence it is more a factor, probably of liking the heat or not. Working outside, is certainly not for everyone. Most tend to cover up these days to avoid sunburn, plus with the increased awareness around skin cancer , so it would, I imagine get somewhat hot with all that clobber on.
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Old Jul 5th 2020, 8:13 am
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Default Re: They Drink A Lot - Eight Things A Backpacker Wished She'd Known About Austra

Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
It was late eighties. I assumed most places were the same. The smell of burning peat dominated the early mornings especially. Most seemed to go to the pub, I assumed to keep warm besides the craic. Like I mentioned, I have heard with some repletion, some questionable builds ,
going up during the 'boom' when real estate went crazy.
Actually you may be surprised to learn that the night temperature can drop down to 3 degrees and early mornings in winter can be extremely cold. But winter, usually only lasts about three months. Hence it is more a factor, probably of liking the heat or not. Working outside, is certainly not for everyone. Most tend to cover up these days to avoid sunburn, plus with the increased awareness around skin cancer , so it would, I imagine get somewhat hot with all that clobber on.
3 degrees? Wow no wonder houses are cold. We get drops down to 0 but the same as yourself winter only lasts 3 months and then temperatures rise. Are heat transfer systems common over there? They are becoming more common here though they should be a standard.
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