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Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

Old Jun 8th 2019, 8:01 pm
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Default Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

I'm a dual citizen (British / Australian) and considering studying in Australia. Planning to study to masters level, in chemical engineering. There's only so much you can figure out online about universities on the other side of the world, and it would be nice to have some perspective about what's best from people within Australia.

Where is the 'best' place to study engineering in Australia? Obviously a highly subjective question but any information is useful (mostly relating to the academics of the uni, but other information about unis, such as how it's like to live there, etc. is also welcome).

From various rankings online, etc, it seems like the best universities are (in no real order):
  • University of Melbourne (I see that they don't offer a bachelors in engineering, however their bachelors in science seems to contain many engineering aspects to it within the chemical systems major, which shaves off a year of studying chemical engineering at masters level there. It seems to me that I could make this almost entirely an engineering degree - is this incorrect? Perhaps might run into issues with employers thinking it isn't really an engineering degree (but a masters in engineering would offset this, surely? Just my thoughts.)?
  • Monash University (This seems to be fairly far out from the centre of Melbourne though. I'm a city person, lived in London since birth, and I'm not sure I'd like being a little far out. But I've heard it's an excellent uni.)
  • University of Sydney
  • UNSW (Don't offer CSP at masters level however, so this looks like it would be a significant expense)
  • University of Queensland

Also seen stuff about ANU but they don't seem to offer a chemical engineering program that appeals to me.

Information about engineering 'climate' in Australia is also welcome. It seems like it is fairly sought after as a degree / profession etc? Not sure about the specifics of chemical engineering however.
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Old Jun 10th 2019, 3:34 am
  #2  
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Default Re: Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

Originally Posted by British_Aussie View Post
I'm a dual citizen (British / Australian) and considering studying in Australia. Planning to study to masters level, in chemical engineering. There's only so much you can figure out online about universities on the other side of the world, and it would be nice to have some perspective about what's best from people within Australia.

Where is the 'best' place to study engineering in Australia? Obviously a highly subjective question but any information is useful (mostly relating to the academics of the uni, but other information about unis, such as how it's like to live there, etc. is also welcome).

From various rankings online, etc, it seems like the best universities are (in no real order):
  • University of Melbourne (I see that they don't offer a bachelors in engineering, however their bachelors in science seems to contain many engineering aspects to it within the chemical systems major, which shaves off a year of studying chemical engineering at masters level there. It seems to me that I could make this almost entirely an engineering degree - is this incorrect? Perhaps might run into issues with employers thinking it isn't really an engineering degree (but a masters in engineering would offset this, surely? Just my thoughts.)?
  • Monash University (This seems to be fairly far out from the centre of Melbourne though. I'm a city person, lived in London since birth, and I'm not sure I'd like being a little far out. But I've heard it's an excellent uni.)
  • University of Sydney
  • UNSW (Don't offer CSP at masters level however, so this looks like it would be a significant expense)
  • University of Queensland

Also seen stuff about ANU but they don't seem to offer a chemical engineering program that appeals to me.

Information about engineering 'climate' in Australia is also welcome. It seems like it is fairly sought after as a degree / profession etc? Not sure about the specifics of chemical engineering however.

Have a play around with this website, it's an indicator of quality standards for all aussie unis, and will let you compare different facets of unis including employability
https://www.qilt.edu.au/study-areas/...neering?type=1

However also note than many employers will recruit from any uni - use this link to look at the variety of employers
https://au.gradconnection.com/gradua...al-processing/

You could also contact Engineers Australia - and ask that question - although I think they'll say there is no one uni that is best - be interesting to know
https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/
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Old Jun 10th 2019, 1:59 pm
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Default Re: Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

Thanks for these websites! QILT let me see quite a few things, such as that the University of Queensland has a high student satisfaction. However I was concerned to see that graduate salaries for the University of Melbourne were very low (when I compared postgraduate engineering courses at the 5 I listed in the original post. I intended to post an image here but can't yet due to not having enough score.) They're at $60,000 whereas the others are all at the average of $90,000 or above it. This seems strangely low.... I was under the impression that the University of Melbourne was one of Australia's best?
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Old Jun 11th 2019, 1:57 am
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Default Re: Studying (Chemical) Engineering in Australia

Originally Posted by British_Aussie View Post
Thanks for these websites! QILT let me see quite a few things, such as that the University of Queensland has a high student satisfaction. However I was concerned to see that graduate salaries for the University of Melbourne were very low (when I compared postgraduate engineering courses at the 5 I listed in the original post. I intended to post an image here but can't yet due to not having enough score.) They're at $60,000 whereas the others are all at the average of $90,000 or above it. This seems strangely low.... I was under the impression that the University of Melbourne was one of Australia's best?
It does not really matter which uni might be seen as 'best'. Employers are not dazzled by which uni you go to - unless there is a particular subject(s) they desire. The employers will focus on what grades you got = your performance, and what type of related and non-related work experience you will be bringing. Also how you connect and keep up to date with all things chemical engineering e.g. membership and attendance at engineering associations/events. Like many things, ratings are just based on the number of people who responded. Choose a uni based on what they're offering - they will all have slightly different subjects despite being the same degree.
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