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Speeding In Queensland

Speeding In Queensland

Old Nov 17th 2001, 4:05 pm
  #1  
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I would be very grateful for some advice.
I have just received a speeding fine from Queensland Police following a visit to Australia in August for driving at 87km in a 60km zone.
Living in the UK I have no immediate plans to return to Australia but would like to one day!
Does anybody know the potential consequences of not paying the fine?-could I be refused an entry visa etc?

Many Thanks
Adrian
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Old Nov 17th 2001, 6:26 pm
  #2  
Jeff Perlman
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While travelling in Victoria last July, I recieved 2 speeding tickets and wondered
the same thing. I spoke with Australian immigration, who informed me that I would
have no problem, as for americans (and i'd assume british, as well) there is only a
background check done with the federal police and this would not turn up minor state
infractions such as speeding. So I didn't pay the fines (AU$400 total).

Upon returning to the US, I recieved an overdue notice from the Victoria police for
one of my tickets. I sent a mesage to the Australian Embassy here in the US, and the
Aussie Federal Police representative there replied as follows (this is a small part
of his email:

"When traffic fines are not paid they will eventually become a Warrant of
Committment. if you were in Australia again and happended to be involved with Police,
ie another speeding ticket, and your name was checked as is normal then the existence
of this Warrant would be made available. With this type of warrant you have to
immediately pay the monies owing or go to jail for a specific period relative to the
amount owing. The amount owing would be more than the original ticket as it incurs a
non-payment penalty and administrative costs. All warrants in Australia are
enforceable in all States regardless of the issueing jurisdiction.

"The fines are not enforceable in the USA and if you never intend to travel to
Australia again then you will never hear anything further."

Hope this helps, Jeff

AWoodcraft
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Old Nov 17th 2001, 10:35 pm
  #3  
Mr Krinkle
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Here's an idea... DON'T SPEED!!!!
 
Old Nov 17th 2001, 11:04 pm
  #4  
Ginz
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"AWoodcraft" schreef in bericht
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*Haven't you ever heard of Karma?*

Just pay the fine. Don't give us tourists such a bad name.

ginz

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Old Nov 18th 2001, 3:08 am
  #5  
Daniel Bowen
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87 in a 60 zone? And you want to dodge the fine? Well see Jeff Perlman's post for
possible consequences.

And do us a favour: If you come back, stick to the speed limit next time. It's a good
way to avoid speeding fines.

Daniel
--
Daniel Bowen, Melbourne, Australia [email protected] http://www.danielbowen.com/
 
Old Nov 18th 2001, 4:00 am
  #6  
Jeff Perlman
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Agreed. But it's too late now. Once you drive in the NT for a few days and keep
seeing the signs with black circles with lines through them... you get used to
pushing a bit harder with your right right foot.

If I had more money at the time, I would have paid the fine. But being a student, I
didn't. And I'm sure I will be back in the future, probably after I have a real job.
I will have to pay the fine then (plus applicable late and administrative fees).
Consider it delayed payment on credit.

As for others in my situation, take the consequences either way into account and make
a decison. None of us can tell Adrian what to do without knowing his situation.

Jeff

Mr Krinkle wrote in message ...
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Old Nov 18th 2001, 5:28 am
  #7  
Kerry
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Whenever I do a country trip I put the cruise control on 100 kph when I see the 100
sign. Then back to 60, when I see the 60 sign and so on. Drivers behind me get really
pissed, some even blast their horn at me. It seems many drivers believe it's OK to do
70 kph when the sign says 60 and 110 when the sign says 100.

My friends have accused me of being a dangerous driver because I "don't keep up with
the traffic"

Captains of ships and smaller vessels at sea, keep to the very respected rules of
seamanship. Pilots of aircraft, train and coach drivers would never think of breaking
the rules.

Why do people think nothing of breaking the rules when they step into one of the most
dangerous forms of transport, the car? Why does the law of the sea get respect. The
law of the road not?

Kerry

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[usenetquote2]> >Here's an idea... DON'T SPEED!!!![/usenetquote2]
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Old Nov 18th 2001, 11:30 am
  #8  
Walter Caremans
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Hi speed ticket just pay ( there are credit cards to do so) Walter from Belgium areal
Aussie lover

[usenetquote2]> > I would be very grateful for some advice. I have just received a speeding fine[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > from Queensland Police following a visit to Australia in August for driving at[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > 87km in a 60km zone. Living in the UK I have no immediate plans to return to[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Australia but would like to one day! Does anybody know the potential consequences[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > of not paying the fine?-could I be refused an entry visa etc?[/usenetquote2]
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Old Nov 18th 2001, 4:33 pm
  #9  
Adiabl0
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What ever happened to if you can't pay the fine don't do the crime. Do the right
thing and pay the ticket and be done with it. I am sure that you will feel better
in the end.
 
Old Nov 18th 2001, 11:05 pm
  #10  
E. L. Ryan & Co
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I agree with the above poster. People seem to forget one simple fact... speeding is a
CRIME. It is breaking the LAW. To not pay the fine shows a complete lack of respect
for the laws of the country you visited. That said, I have been caught speeding but,
without argument, I paid the fine.

With the current exchange rate you would be looking at quite a small amount of money.
Don't be ignorant, pay the fine and be done with it.

Michelle
 
Old Nov 19th 2001, 9:28 am
  #11  
Craig Welch
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Not practical.

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Craig
 
Old Nov 19th 2001, 7:13 pm
  #12  
Jason
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You are kidding. Coach drivers have never struck me as paragons of virtue. Why do you
think most countries have introduced limiters on coaches? And a lot of boat skippers
don't seem to stick to marina limits either.

Next you'll be telling me that taxi drivers know how to use their indicators.

Mind you, I've not got much sympathy for anyone speeding by that much in a 60. The
open road is another matter.

Jason

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http://www.scuba-addict.co.uk/ for the UK viz database and trip reports about
Australia, the Caribbean, Spain, the Maldives, Bali and the UK
 
Old Nov 19th 2001, 10:25 pm
  #13  
Daniel Bowen
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LOL! Well that's an interesting kind of reverse logic.

I endeavour not to drive faster than the speed limit. If someone else wants to speed,
that's their business. I just hope they don't have a prang because of it.

But anybody who claims "Oh it's impossible not to get fined for speeding, it's just
part of driving"... well, I'm afraid they're simply wrong.

Daniel
--
Daniel Bowen, Melbourne, Australia [email protected] Visiting Australia FAQ
http://www.custard.net.au/australia/
 
Old Nov 19th 2001, 11:51 pm
  #14  
Dave Campbell
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[usenetquote2]> >Here's an idea... DON'T SPEED!!!![/usenetquote2]
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If I may play devil's advocate for a moment here:

We're all assuming that the speed limit was clearly signposted - if not, then the
situation is altered considerably. Now, if we take it that the speed limit is known,
and the vehicle had a functioning speedometer (within the 10% tolerance which has
been observed within certain vehicles on the market, although I have heard a
magistrate state that a driver who couldn't tell the difference between 80 and
100km/h without instrument assistance should not be on the road anyway) then consider
why the driver was not maintaining his speed within the specified limit. Speed is one
of the more basic parameters that is under the control of the driver. So failure to
observe the speed limit is either a result of the driver not being in proper control
of the vehicle or having made a conscious decision to disregard the law. You choose
which you would prefer.

The offence occurred in a 60km/h zone, so chances are it was a built-up area. That
means the possibility of pedestrians, and vehicles entering and leaving the roadway.
Given that the human eye is not all that well designed for judging distance and
speed, people need to be able to make some assumptions about the speed of approaching
vehicles. A vehicle travelling at 40 to 50% above the designated limit poses a
substantially increased threat.

Additionally, features such as safe overtaking areas, no-parking zones, turn
restrictions and timing of signals are designed around the sight and stopping
distances for vehicles travelling at or close to the speed limit. Disregarding
reaction time, at 87km/h your stopping distance is more than double what it is at 60.
Looking at it another way, consider the distance it takes to stop your vehicle from
60km/h. Having started at 87km/h and covered the same distance our offender's vehicle
will still be doing *over* 60km/h. Consider why, in a built-up area, you might want
to stop suddenly.

Sorry if I seem excessively passionate about this, but I live on a major road and
have had a number of near misses with vehicles travelling well in excess of the speed
limit. It might be a major road, but it's also a residential street and I should be
entitled to the same protection as the rest of the community. Besides, the people who
speed past my place are the same people who speed past your place, regardless of
whether you live on a highway or a cul-de-sac.

It's all about choice and consequence. In this case, the possible consequences range
from a fine to property damage, injury or fatality. (Yes, people really do die when
they're struck by a car doing 80km/h.) A fine is the absolute minimum consequence you
can expect as a result of a bad decision or poor vehicle control. A little bit of
strict budgetting and you'll be back on track. But hopefully a little wiser and more
considerate for your experience. Meanwhile, consider what your experience might have
been and ask yourself whether the minutes saved are really worth it.

Dave Campbell
 
Old Nov 20th 2001, 1:44 am
  #15  
Daniel Bowen
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I'm particularly amused when people race past me, and a minute later I meet them
again at the next set of traffic lights!

Daniel
--
Daniel Bowen, Melbourne, Australia [email protected] Guide to Australia:
http://www.toxiccustard.com/australia/
 

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