British Expats

British Expats (https://britishexpats.com/forum/)
-   Australia (https://britishexpats.com/forum/australia-54/)
-   -   Schooling in Australia (https://britishexpats.com/forum/australia-54/schooling-australia-787829/)

glittababe Feb 24th 2013 5:14 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 

Originally Posted by ailsacott (Post 10553409)
Wanting to hear from moms and dads, How do you find the state schooling in Australia? How does it compare to the education held in the uk? Better, worse? Kids settling in? Hidden costs? that sort of thing...

I have two daughters (6 and 4) Relocating to Oz in the near future, was just wondering, if anyone had any info they would kindly share.

Thanks : )

Pretty much as everyone else has said....backward in comparison to UK. We went around heaps of schools in the Noosa area both private and state, and fell in love with Eumundi SS. All our boys went through the school, loved it and are now in high school. States high school was a def big no no up here. My hubby's a cop and knows the probs experienced in Noosa District and Sunshine Beach state high school. We went on word of mouth and chose St Teresa's in Noosaville. Amazing school, the boys are very happy. Cost for 3 boys around 16k a year, so I'm counting down the days until they finish year 12 :rofl: I am however very happy with the choices we've made.

fromthetoon Feb 24th 2013 6:10 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
In the UK parents get pulled in by school results which do not tell the full story of the school. In Aus, results are important but many look at the culture and how their children are going to be nurtured through school.
Unless your child has learning difficulties, your child's grades will not differ much whether they're in a state or private school if they are determined to do well.

Often the difference is also in the type of people they are in contact with and the more professional contacts they obtain by attending a private school.
I took a club U13 football training session on Friday evening and three kids seemed to enjoy messing about whilst I gave instructions. The others were silent and respectful. It just so happened that the 3 students were all from a state school and the other 10 (apart from 2 others), attended a private school.

mand8002 Feb 24th 2013 6:29 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
I think it is hard to make a blanket statement like 'way behind the UK' as the education is very different. We found that our daughter was behind in some areas but ahead in others. Talents are nurtured whether they are in academia, sport or music I have found and having three children go through the UK system and one go through the Australian system, I feel the last one that went through the Australian system had a more rounded education.

fromthetoon Feb 24th 2013 11:47 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
Well said Mand8002. Totally agree but in terms of lower primary education, our experience says that the UK students are well ahead of QLD students. The UK generally starts about a year before the kids here in Ozz and The 'rounded' education you talk about starts having an effect around grade 4 or 5. Kids in Aussie schools seem to be more confident in presentation work.

spouse of scouse Feb 24th 2013 12:27 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
Just a couple of things - not all Catholic schools in Australia are single gender, there are many co-ed ones.

The secondary school kids in private schools may present better, due to strict uniform requirements, but if little Johnny or Jane prefers to socialise at school rather than learn, then they'll get the same educational outcome whether in the state or private system.

RedDragon2008 Mar 1st 2013 12:53 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
In VIC most of the private schools esp the ones offering IB are on par with UK schooling if not better. There are several tiers of private schools where there is a variation in the fees. Most Catholic schools at primary level are co-ed; only gets single sexed come secondary. Depending on where you are, you may find co-ed Catholic secondary school too. Catholic schools also getting a bad name because of some are linked with abuse cases. Can sit for scholarship exams for private too at entry points in Yr 5, 7 and 10.

Dann2000 Mar 1st 2013 10:25 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
Sorry to hijack this thread but I'm bringing over my 2 teenage daughters, ages 16 & 15, and we are looking at the Cleveland area of Brisbane. They both go to Grammar schools in the UK and we are worried about the level of schools both state and private. Unfortunately my Visa runs out in October otherwise we would have wait for them to finish their GCSEs before moving, if anybody has made the move with children of a similar age I would really appreciate any opinions.

Chortlepuss Mar 3rd 2013 6:05 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 

Originally Posted by Dann2000 (Post 10578191)
Sorry to hijack this thread but I'm bringing over my 2 teenage daughters, ages 16 & 15, and we are looking at the Cleveland area of Brisbane. They both go to Grammar schools in the UK and we are worried about the level of schools both state and private. Unfortunately my Visa runs out in October otherwise we would have wait for them to finish their GCSEs before moving, if anybody has made the move with children of a similar age I would really appreciate any opinions.

Wow, what a tough age to move! if your kids are academic and hard workers, I'd recommend Queensland Academies - My youngest (16) goes to the Queensland Academy of Science and Mathematics at Toowong, and they have an astonishing education (International Baccalaureate) and some of the best exam results in Brisbane. It's a state school (we pay $600 per term which is a bargain). The kids are worked like dogs and it's not for everyone, but there's no way I could have afforded an equivalent education in the UK

fromthetoon Mar 3rd 2013 7:20 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
Imagine your girls not doing any GCSE's but just going straight for 'A' Levels - that's what happens over here. At 16 they would happily go onto the Senior Program (last 2 years of school) which is assessed similar to BTEC. You accumulate points through subject grades to gain an OP score which enables you to apply for certain courses at degree level.

astera Mar 3rd 2013 1:12 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
I take it finding a British school is like looking for a needle in a haystack, and once you find it the price-tag is astronomical?

Dann2000 Mar 4th 2013 1:58 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 

Originally Posted by Chortlepuss (Post 10579983)
Wow, what a tough age to move! if your kids are academic and hard workers, I'd recommend Queensland Academies - My youngest (16) goes to the Queensland Academy of Science and Mathematics at Toowong, and they have an astonishing education (International Baccalaureate) and some of the best exam results in Brisbane. It's a state school (we pay $600 per term which is a bargain). The kids are worked like dogs and it's not for everyone, but there's no way I could have afforded an equivalent education in the UK

Thanks, I hadn't heard of these Academies before. Its too late for us to consider for our eldest because of cut off dates to apply which is a real shame because out of the 2 she is probably the most academic but we will certainly consider for the youngest.
Thanks again for the info.

Dann2000 Mar 4th 2013 2:03 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 

Originally Posted by fromthetoon (Post 10580069)
Imagine your girls not doing any GCSE's but just going straight for 'A' Levels - that's what happens over here. At 16 they would happily go onto the Senior Program (last 2 years of school) which is assessed similar to BTEC. You accumulate points through subject grades to gain an OP score which enables you to apply for certain courses at degree level.

So do they sit any exams to progress into the senior program & do they also choose which subjects they can specialize in?

Thanks

neil248 Mar 5th 2013 7:09 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 

Originally Posted by Chortlepuss (Post 10579983)
Wow, what a tough age to move! if your kids are academic and hard workers, I'd recommend Queensland Academies - My youngest (16) goes to the Queensland Academy of Science and Mathematics at Toowong, and they have an astonishing education (International Baccalaureate) and some of the best exam results in Brisbane. It's a state school (we pay $600 per term which is a bargain). The kids are worked like dogs and it's not for everyone, but there's no way I could have afforded an equivalent education in the UK

Went to the open day for the Gold Coast Queensland Academy.

A state school but not as you know it.

There is no detention, lockers are left unlocked, fridges supplied to put your lunch in, microwaves to heat your lunch.

Amazing how certain kids can be relied on to do the right thing regarding their conduct and work ethic!

The entire school that is

fromthetoon Mar 8th 2013 10:36 am

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
As you know, in the UK students sit GCSE's which basically reflects what chances they have at 'A' level. Not here. No entry exams exists in QLD. I'm currently teaching a unit of work ( Term 1) on Biomechanics in sport. Students are given either an assignment, an inclass essay or an oral presentation to complete at the end of the term. They are then assessed on that piece of work plus their practical ability. They then move on to the next term and study another element of sport such as sport psychology where they will receive another assessment. There is no final exam for them to revise for and will complete 4 pieces of assessment by the end of year 11.

jad n rich Mar 8th 2013 1:36 pm

Re: Schooling in Australia
 
Last one in grade 12 now, so with the 3 of them covered most grades. Did private and state and IB.

Main points.

Kids found school very easy, colouring in in grade 7 :rofl: didnt laugh then but no wonder they love it, all play no work. Great fun!

Grade 10 11 12 massive shock, suddenly you do work.

Same school could vary massively according to the teacher and mix of kids. Even the amount of work done each year varied, disturbing when they would reach a new year level and had to be asked who had done what:eek: Other years fab teachers, you never knew what to expect year from year, but I think the curriculum might be more regulated now.

Schools brag a lot each one had a ' we are the best blurb', would really try to sell you the school, even if it was crap:lol:

Little or NO funding for learning disabilities, dyslexia for instance, shocking.

Bullies everywhere, state and private. Drugs everywhere, what would you like? Most parents would be amazed if they knew, my two have left spill the beans on what was going on, one was in private one in state . Lots of sex going on in grade 9:eek: That shocked me more than the drugs. And booze, drinking culture is big here too.

You can do well, youngest has just had his OP estimated and its very very good, but he has that sort of brain, just a state school, there was a knife fight there today:eek: so same school, different kids going very different paths, thats it at the end of the day, the kid as much as the school. And sometimes the worst kids are from the best families and vice versa.


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:07 pm.

Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.