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The land of Plenty never

The land of Plenty never

Old Nov 19th 2002, 4:32 am
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Default The land of Plenty never

You think that the wages are poor in UK , wait until you pick up the peanuts that are called wages here I should feel rich when I look at these figures even mince here looks dear at $11 per kilo on these wages.




Average Aussie earns $350 a week: ABS

The mean household size in Australia was 2.6 people and the weekly income generated by the average Australian household was $700-$799," the ABS said in a statement.



CANBERRA

THE average Aussie is in their mid-30s, earns about $350 a week, spends about $900 a month paying off their home and lives with at least one other person, new figures show.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics today released the final details of the 2001 Census which found in August that year the average Australian earned between $300 and $399 a week and had a weekly family income of between $800 and $999.

They were paying between $800 and $999 a month on their home loan and between $150 and $199 a week if they were renting.

"The mean household size in Australia was 2.6 people and the weekly income generated by the average Australian household was $700-$799," the ABS said in a statement.

The 2001 Census selected averages report found South Australia had the oldest median age at 37 years and the smallest mean household size at 2.4 people.

The Northern Territory, on the other hand, had the youngest median age at 30 years and the largest mean household size at three people.

The NT and NSW had Australia's highest median housing loan repayments at between $1000 and $1199 a month while South Australia and Tasmania were the lowest at between $600 and $799.

Tasmania and SA also had the lowest median weekly household income at between $600 and $699.

"Tasmania recorded the lowest median weekly family income of $700-$799," the ABS said.

"Highest median weekly income levels were found in the Australian Capital Territory with family income at $1200-$1499 and household income at $1000-$1199."

Outdoing the States, the ACT and NT recorded higher median weekly individual incomes at between $500 and $599 and between $400 and $499 respectively.

The states all recorded median individual income levels of between $300 and $399 per week.
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Old Nov 19th 2002, 4:42 am
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Default Re: The land of Plenty never

Originally posted by pommie bastard
You think that the wages are poor in UK , wait until you pick up the peanuts that are called wages here I should feel rich when I look at these figures even mince here looks dear at $11 per kilo on these wages.




Average Aussie earns $350 a week: ABS

The mean household size in Australia was 2.6 people and the weekly income generated by the average Australian household was $700-$799," the ABS said in a statement.



CANBERRA

THE average Aussie is in their mid-30s, earns about $350 a week, spends about $900 a month paying off their home and lives with at least one other person, new figures show.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics today released the final details of the 2001 Census which found in August that year the average Australian earned between $300 and $399 a week and had a weekly family income of between $800 and $999.

They were paying between $800 and $999 a month on their home loan and between $150 and $199 a week if they were renting.

"The mean household size in Australia was 2.6 people and the weekly income generated by the average Australian household was $700-$799," the ABS said in a statement.

The 2001 Census selected averages report found South Australia had the oldest median age at 37 years and the smallest mean household size at 2.4 people.

The Northern Territory, on the other hand, had the youngest median age at 30 years and the largest mean household size at three people.

The NT and NSW had Australia's highest median housing loan repayments at between $1000 and $1199 a month while South Australia and Tasmania were the lowest at between $600 and $799.

Tasmania and SA also had the lowest median weekly household income at between $600 and $699.

"Tasmania recorded the lowest median weekly family income of $700-$799," the ABS said.

"Highest median weekly income levels were found in the Australian Capital Territory with family income at $1200-$1499 and household income at $1000-$1199."

Outdoing the States, the ACT and NT recorded higher median weekly individual incomes at between $500 and $599 and between $400 and $499 respectively.

The states all recorded median individual income levels of between $300 and $399 per week.
Unfortunately I have to agree with you on this one. I say unfortunately, because when we were thinking of coming over here, we did our homework (or so we thought) and it appeared from the bulls*** that jobs were a) plentiful and b) well paid. This is definitely NOT the case here in Brisbane.

Also, our food bill is roughly the same as it was in the UK (we don't live on steak and caviar here either, so I am comparing like for like).

I seriously wonder if all the "Come to the land of plenty" hype is just the Dept. of Immigration making their $milliions and laughing at us all the way to the bank...
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Old Nov 19th 2002, 5:37 am
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The Sunshine Coast Newspaper reported similar earnings in the $300 bracket just this week. I think that the Aussie way of employing people as Casual Labour (ie paid by the hour if and when employer wants you and no benefits such as hols or sick pay is part of the reason.) I honestly know people who have been 'casual' for 15 years. A suburb breakdown in the Courier Mail Real Estate section recently also printed many suburbs with incomes of $200 - $400 per week. However the Welfare Mentality here often has people who only want to work a few hours a week so they can get maximum welfare. When my kids were in primary school, it seemed everyone knew just how many hours they could do before loosing benefits, frankly it was disgraceful.

However I do know many people who work their butts off and doing 6 days a week are earning $800+ before tax. So I guess attitude to work has something to do with it.
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Old Nov 19th 2002, 8:39 pm
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It is possible to earn a good wage. The figures are averages and when averages are low it usually means that the person who tries harder can earn well above the average.

When I first arrived I got a menial low paid job in a warehouse, but soon found that most aussies don't give a toss about "getting on". The beach/pub/barbie etc was more important. I remember hearing someone whoop with delight in the beginning of January because he had another four weeks worth of "sickies".

So I tried harder and showed interest in my job. Sorry if the next bit sounds pretentious or whatever, but eventually I did get to the top and became Managing Director. For the last three years I have been running my own company and making ten times what I could have earned in the UK.

The difference here, is there are more opportunities for someone who wants to succeed. When service is bad (and it really is awful in most industries) any extra effort is rewarded.
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Old Nov 19th 2002, 10:29 pm
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Originally posted by anzen12
It is possible to earn a good wage. The figures are averages and when averages are low it usually means that the person who tries harder can earn well above the average.

When I first arrived I got a menial low paid job in a warehouse, but soon found that most aussies don't give a toss about "getting on". The beach/pub/barbie etc was more important. I remember hearing someone whoop with delight in the beginning of January because he had another four weeks worth of "sickies".

So I tried harder and showed interest in my job. Sorry if the next bit sounds pretentious or whatever, but eventually I did get to the top and became Managing Director. For the last three years I have been running my own company and making ten times what I could have earned in the UK.

The difference here, is there are more opportunities for someone who wants to succeed. When service is bad (and it really is awful in most industries) any extra effort is rewarded.
Glad to hear you have made a success out of Oz - I don't think many do these days, not Brits anyway. Can I ask how long it took you to reach the dizzy heights of M.D.?

Also, from personal experience, your comment about when service is bad any extra effort is rewarded, is unfortunately not always the case. All too often the work is given to "my mate" or "my mate's mate" - no matter whether the "mate" is any good at what he does or not - certainly here in Brisbane that is the case...
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Old Nov 19th 2002, 11:11 pm
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Just over 8 years. I live in Sydney, so I'm not sure how work compares to the other cities. I know what you mean about giving work to mates, but I found if I just kept plugging away, eventually people started to appreciate the extra effort.

I think most people have stories of waiting for a tradesman/contractor/removalist/telephone company/plumber just not turning up let alone being late. The expression "no worries mate" or "she'll be right" used to fill me with dread . When you work for a big company you also have the fear of sucking up if you work too hard. So most people take the easy route and slow down. I am not a workaholic or driven by money, I just thought I won't waste my time - and within a year I started to get promoted. Maybe I was lucky, but the rest really was not that hard.
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Old Nov 21st 2002, 12:46 am
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Originally posted by anzen12
It is possible to earn a good wage. The figures are averages and when averages are low it usually means that the person who tries harder can earn well above the average.

When I first arrived I got a menial low paid job in a warehouse, but soon found that most aussies don't give a toss about "getting on". The beach/pub/barbie etc was more important. I remember hearing someone whoop with delight in the beginning of January because he had another four weeks worth of "sickies".

So I tried harder and showed interest in my job. Sorry if the next bit sounds pretentious or whatever, but eventually I did get to the top and became Managing Director. For the last three years I have been running my own company and making ten times what I could have earned in the UK.

The difference here, is there are more opportunities for someone who wants to succeed. When service is bad (and it really is awful in most industries) any extra effort is rewarded.

HA HA , give it a rest average means some will earn less some more but the figure quoted is not far wrong the wages here are rubbish.
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Old Nov 21st 2002, 1:40 am
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HOMING IN ON A LOAN

BY ANDREW OXLADE

10:30 - 12 November 2002

The fight for a foothold on the housing ladder is getting tougher. Across the country, property prices are now 24 per cent higher than in January, says Nationwide building society.

But while prices race away, wages are increasing at walking pace. So what can you do if the dream of owning a home of your own is vanishing into the distance?

Multiples and affordability are the two words to keep in mind when hunting for a mortgage. As our examples below show, a couple who each earn £20,000 a year and have no debts could borrow from £100,000 to £162,500, depending on where they go for a loan.

Traditionally, mortgage providers stuck to lending single buyers three times their annual salary, while a couple could secure 2? times their earnings. Now multiples of 3? and three times, respectively, are common.

Some lenders also consider multiples together with affordability - a measure of your income versus your outgoings.

Nationwide, Standard Life and Intelligent Finance, Halifax's online bank, are among those who rely entirely on affordability. Nationwide, for example, would lend £162,500 to our couple, a multiple of more than four times salary.

Lenders who mix multiples with affordability or rely solely on higher multiples would let our couple borrow £110,000. Examples include Britannia Building Society, Alliance & Leicester or HSBC.

Those sticking to the traditional multiples, such as Halifax or Yorkshire Building Society, would lend only £100,000.

It can get complicated. For instance, Virgin One will lend 3? times the higher income plus one times the other wage, or 2? times the joint income. Our couple could secure £110,000 from Virgin, but if one earned £30,000 and the other £10,000, the loan could be £122,500. NatWest operates the same system, and both offer a high 3? multiple for single buyers.

There are other opportunities for certain workers. Public employees, such as teachers and nurses, can borrow up to five times their salary from the Marketplace at Bradford & Bingley. Royal Bank of Scotland will also lend up to five times, but for a limited list of professionals.

Scottish Widows Bank runs a similar scheme for professionals and recent graduates. It will also lend up to 102 per cent of the property value.

Some lenders vary multiples between their own deals. Northern Rock, for example, will lend £110,000 on traditional mortgages or £120,000 on its Together all-in-one flexible mortgage.

But borrowers should beware of taking on too much debt. "Anything over four times salary for a single earner or three times for a couple is beginning to stretch it a bit,'' warns David Hollingworth at mortgage broker London & Country.

Many pundits believe the strong rally in house prices could be over. A failure to meet hefty repayments is bearable when homeowners can sell up for a profit. But being forced to sell in a falling market can be financially devastating, as thousands with negative equity discovered in the early Nineties.
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Old Nov 21st 2002, 3:11 am
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Originally posted by madmancunian
HOMING IN ON A LOAN

BY ANDREW OXLADE

10:30 - 12 November 2002


Many pundits believe the strong rally in house prices could be over. A failure to meet hefty repayments is bearable when homeowners can sell up for a profit. But being forced to sell in a falling market can be financially devastating, as thousands with negative equity discovered in the early Nineties.

Same thing going on in Australia , house prices are getting out of hand when compared to wages its just the same only you people are far better paid plus interest rates are higher in Australia.
Many people on this site are already on housing ladder so it comes down to how much is in your pocket every pay day , a lot here struggle to earn in dollars what a lot earn in pounds in the UK , $350 is average wage here just makes it above third world stardards.

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Old Nov 21st 2002, 11:28 pm
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It seems facts and emotions clash again. The minimum wage in the UK is about the same as Australia ($11.35 v 4.20 pounds per hour) Averages have to take into account the highest as well as the lowest. One very highly paid person will increase the average, therefore unless you quote all the information, the figure is meaningless.

Any discussion on a board like this is going to be mainly anecdotal. Therefore, I can only assume that the people who have money and lifestyle problems are poorly paid and mix with similar friends. Of course the reverse applies. Therefore, I can only assume that pommiebastard is poorly paid, lives in a grotty house and surrounds himself with similar characters. Most Brits that I know, are very glad they made the move. They have bigger homes, a much nicer lifestyle (weather, beaches, parks etc) and wouldn't move back in a blue fit.

The ones who do moan, I suspect used to moan before they came. There is always something to complain about. It's what you do about it that counts.
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Old Nov 22nd 2002, 3:32 am
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Originally posted by anzen12
It seems facts and emotions clash again. The minimum wage in the UK is about the same as Australia ($11.35 v 4.20 pounds per hour) Averages have to take into account the highest as well as the lowest. One very highly paid person will increase the average, therefore unless you quote all the information, the figure is meaningless.

Any
The figure quoted was not min wage but average wage so , your point is of no use at all but I would say more here earn the minimium than the UK or the so called Award rate thats bloody poor too.
Great that you have done well , but most of the people I know here are carrying more debt and have less in their pockets a trip out to the pub is beyond most .
I know loads of company directors in Perth all run around in utes with blue heelers in the back I think they call themselfs bricklayers.
Found it interesting that you pointed out that Aussies have no drive ,is that is the reason they are paid peanuts , thats all monkeys need?



Last edited by pommie bastard; Nov 22nd 2002 at 6:30 am.
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Old Nov 22nd 2002, 6:16 am
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The figure quoted was not min wage but average wage so , your point is of no use at all but I would say more here earn the minimium that the UK or the so called Award rate thats bloody poor too.
The point I was making is that averages are meaningless by themselves. You need to know how many people are on each scale. The minimum wage is a starting point of comparison. The fact that over one and a half million people in the UK had to get a pay rise, just to get on the minimum wage when it was introduced, is a telling point.
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Old Nov 22nd 2002, 6:28 am
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Originally posted by anzen12
The point I was making is that averages are meaningless by themselves. You need to know how many people are on each scale. The minimum wage is a starting point of comparison. The fact that over one and a half million people in the UK had to get a pay rise, just to get on the minimum wage when it was introduced, is a telling point.
Out of a work force of 22 million hardly makes it a average wage does it? now give Australian figures and do all the people you employ get above Award or min?

By the way British average works out at $1200 AUD per week.


Last edited by pommie bastard; Nov 22nd 2002 at 6:34 am.
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Old Nov 22nd 2002, 8:49 am
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Out of a work force of 22 million hardly makes it a average wage does it? now give Australian figures and do all the people you employ get above Award or min?
They get much more than the minimum. Everyone is on a profit sharing scheme - and the business makes an excellent profit.

What I said was this was just the number that had to get an increase to get to the minimum wage. Not the total number. Strangely that seems to be hidden - or at least I couldn't find the figure. In Australia there are about the same number - 1.5 million on the minimum wage.

Incidentally, in an earlier post you said the average Australian wage was $350 per week. I checked the ABS and they showed $961 pw in 1999 (it's a huge URL but you can find it under Survey of Income and Housing Costs). However, you are right the average UK wage is higher. I just don't have the time to work out all the cost of living stuff, which I believe would show that we have a better standard of living. Anecdotally, I have no doubt.
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Old Nov 22nd 2002, 9:50 pm
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Be careful here, household income is the total income of the household, like us there may be three income earners certainly two, which accounts for the higher figure.

The individual wage pommie discussed is quoted as the Individual wage ie, for one person not the household.

The figures are from the ABS not from Pommies Social experiences as you suggest.
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