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British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 3:49 pm
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Default British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Hello,

So I’m absolutely desperate to live with my lovely Nan in Australia. She is 91 and like my mother, originally I always traveled to her and would stay the maximum my visa would allow, due to me having 3 children now (aged 6, 4 & 14 months) she now travels to the U.K.

We are desperate for a holiday so saving tightly to fly to Oz this Easter with my girls!

I am now a single parent, and early pregnant with my 4th. What would happen if I was to stay in Oz for the maximum stay family visa, and gave birth in Australia? Would I be covered by Medicare? Would I need private insurance? Would it even be allowed? And most importantly is there any chance baby could be dual citizenship? Both the father and I, are UK nationals with no links to Australia.

Also, is there any chance I could ever spend my Nan’s last years together in Australia? I am single, 3 Kids, no skills so skilled migration is out. Have looked at the carer option for my nan, but I don’t think you can have dependant children!

I do not want to take any of Australia’s money, my Nan is happy to sponsor us and I have a small nest egg to help until I can find work. Thanks :-)
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 5:24 pm
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by Nat230291 View Post
Hello,

So I’m absolutely desperate to live with my lovely Nan in Australia. She is 91 and like my mother, originally I always traveled to her and would stay the maximum my visa would allow, due to me having 3 children now (aged 6, 4 & 14 months) she now travels to the U.K.

We are desperate for a holiday so saving tightly to fly to Oz this Easter with my girls!

I am now a single parent, and early pregnant with my 4th. What would happen if I was to stay in Oz for the maximum stay family visa, and gave birth in Australia? Would I be covered by Medicare? Would I need private insurance? Would it even be allowed? And most importantly is there any chance baby could be dual citizenship? Both the father and I, are UK nationals with no links to Australia.

Also, is there any chance I could ever spend my Nan’s last years together in Australia? I am single, 3 Kids, no skills so skilled migration is out. Have looked at the carer option for my nan, but I don’t think you can have dependant children!

I do not want to take any of Australia’s money, my Nan is happy to sponsor us and I have a small nest egg to help until I can find work. Thanks :-)
Firstly the baby will not be a dual citizen, even if born in Aus. To be an Aussie citizen he/she would need at least one parent to be an Aus citizen or perm resident.
Carer visas are very difficult to get, because the care required can usually be obtained ere anyway. You would only be able to emigrate if you fulfil the normal criteria for a skills visa, which you say you do not.

As regards the medical care - hopefully someone with more knowledge of maternity costs will post on here, but generally only emergency care is covered on a tourist visa, and you're expected to have travel insurance to cover any other outlay. From the little I now of it costs associated with giving birth can be high.
You'd need to think very carefully about it from a visa oint of view too - if there was any reason why you could not fly home before the visa expires, due to complications for yourself or the baby, you could have big problems - and remember that would not only mean an overstay on your visa record for yourself, but also for your kids. You would also have to ensure that the airline will let you fly irstly while very pregnant, and secondly with a newborn.

Do not even think abut finding work, as far as I can see at present you are not eligible for any visa with work rights.
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 5:41 pm
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Thanks so much for your reply that has cleared a lot of things up!

I was only mentioning finding work if I was ever able to immigrate which looks pretty unlikely! It’s a beautiful country and I love it so much! Here’s hoping I find a husband then on my holiday (fat chance!)

I think my best bet then is to get my head down and study in the U.K. to become a primary school teacher as they’re currently on the skilled migration list,

Until then, I’ll continue to enjoy my holidays to the lovely Australia x
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 5:54 pm
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Theoretically you could give birth in Australia- how much money have you got? You’re not likey to get insurance to cover a pre-existing condition and DHA are likely to turn you round at the border with a tourist visa going beyond your pregnant tum if, indeed, you can get an airline to board you anyway.

No, you can’t work and if you try you run th3 risk of deportation which would guarantee you never get to spend time with your nana.

Better you save up for her to make the trip back to U.K. maybe with a carer in tow.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 12:32 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

The child will not be an Australian Citizen (and, to put the horse back in front of the cart, therefore won't get you a permanent visa).

That is in fact often tried in the United States, which, unlike Australia, has birthright citizenship.

There is absolutely no possibility that as a non-Australian Citizen or Permanent Resident, you will have access to Medicare.

As a pregnant woman headed to Australia you may in fact be grilled by airline staff or immigration and denied entry if it's felt you have not made adequate insurance preparations for your trip. Some airlines do have a policy about passengers in late-term pregnancy.

You said you had no "skills" so a "skilled visa" is out but based on that comment I am not sure you understand what the "skilled visa" is. It is based on your job. What is your job, and is that on the list? Things like short-order cook, hairdresser, and bricklayer are frequently on it. This list is not just for neurosurgeons and nuclear physicists.

To stop people from claiming they are a short-order cook just to get a visa, you do have to produce training evidence and work experience.

If you are not on the list than I am afraid based on what you have written it will be tourist visas only for you.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 4:17 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
The child will not be an Australian Citizen (and, to put the horse back in front of the cart, therefore won't get you a permanent visa).

That is in fact often tried in the United States, which, unlike Australia, has birthright citizenship.

There is absolutely no possibility that as a non-Australian Citizen or Permanent Resident, you will have access to Medicare.

As a pregnant woman headed to Australia you may in fact be grilled by airline staff or immigration and denied entry if it's felt you have not made adequate insurance preparations for your trip. Some airlines do have a policy about passengers in late-term pregnancy.

You said you had no "skills" so a "skilled visa" is out but based on that comment I am not sure you understand what the "skilled visa" is. It is based on your job. What is your job, and is that on the list? Things like short-order cook, hairdresser, and bricklayer are frequently on it. This list is not just for neurosurgeons and nuclear physicists.

To stop people from claiming they are a short-order cook just to get a visa, you do have to produce training evidence and work experience.

If you are not on the list than I am afraid based on what you have written it will be tourist visas only for you.
She would get access to very limited Medicare (essential treatment only) under the reciprocal scheme with the NHS but that is designed just for emergencyies, not for long term and pre-existing conditions.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 9:05 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
The child will not be an Australian Citizen (and, to put the horse back in front of the cart, therefore won't get you a permanent visa).

That is in fact often tried in the United States, which, unlike Australia, has birthright citizenship.

There is absolutely no possibility that as a non-Australian Citizen or Permanent Resident, you will have access to Medicare.

As a pregnant woman headed to Australia you may in fact be grilled by airline staff or immigration and denied entry if it's felt you have not made adequate insurance preparations for your trip. Some airlines do have a policy about passengers in late-term pregnancy.

You said you had no "skills" so a "skilled visa" is out but based on that comment I am not sure you understand what the "skilled visa" is. It is based on your job. What is your job, and is that on the list? Things like short-order cook, hairdresser, and bricklayer are frequently on it. This list is not just for neurosurgeons and nuclear physicists.

To stop people from claiming they are a short-order cook just to get a visa, you do have to produce training evidence and work experience.

If you are not on the list than I am afraid based on what you have written it will be tourist visas only for you.
Great thanks for your help :-) allthough you can put your ‘horse back behind its cart’ as I know dual citizenship of one child wouldn’t have gotten me a full visa, I was asking so that the child can have a choice of a better lifestyle in the future. I will get my head down for a few years and try and study towards something needed on the skilled migration. Yes I have checked the list, and no I do not qualify on any of them. Looks like I’ll have a few years of hard work ahead of us, until then I look forward to our holiday in a few months time :-)

Last edited by Nat230291; Jan 4th 2018 at 9:09 am.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 9:45 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by Nat230291 View Post
Great thanks for your help :-) allthough you can put your ‘horse back behind its cart’ as I know dual citizenship of one child wouldn’t have gotten me a full visa, I was asking so that the child can have a choice of a better lifestyle in the future. I will get my head down for a few years and try and study towards something needed on the skilled migration. Yes I have checked the list, and no I do not qualify on any of them. Looks like I’ll have a few years of hard work ahead of us, until then I look forward to our holiday in a few months time :-)
Nat, I think it's lovely that you are so close to your Nan. I bet she loves your visits!

Just a wee bit of advice from an old head - whatever you study, make sure it's something you enjoy and genuinely want to have a career in. The skills shortages lists change frequently so there's never a guarantee that any particular occupation will stay there.

All the best to you and your Nan.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 11:16 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
Nat, I think it's lovely that you are so close to your Nan. I bet she loves your visits!

Just a wee bit of advice from an old head - whatever you study, make sure it's something you enjoy and genuinely want to have a career in. The skills shortages lists change frequently so there's never a guarantee that any particular occupation will stay there.

All the best to you and your Nan.
Thank you so much, it was the ‘pre-primary school teacher’ that I wasn’t interested in, which is something I’ve always wanted to do, it also solves the problems of what to do with the children in summer holidays etc as I would be able to be home with them. I absolutely adore my Nan she is amazing, 91 next month and only just flew back to Australia at the beginning of December after coming to visit me and the girls. She is my best friend, we speak every other day on the phone and I truly hope one day we get to be together. I lost my dad when I was 16, and she is his mother, so she is like the last bit of my dad I have left, so have always said I will look after her for my dad. To be honest I enjoy it anyway, she brightens up any room! Xx
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 9:43 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by Nat230291 View Post
Thank you so much, it was the ‘pre-primary school teacher’ that I wasn’t interested in, which is something I’ve always wanted to do, it also solves the problems of what to do with the children in summer holidays etc as I would be able to be home with them. I absolutely adore my Nan she is amazing, 91 next month and only just flew back to Australia at the beginning of December after coming to visit me and the girls. She is my best friend, we speak every other day on the phone and I truly hope one day we get to be together. I lost my dad when I was 16, and she is his mother, so she is like the last bit of my dad I have left, so have always said I will look after her for my dad. To be honest I enjoy it anyway, she brightens up any room! Xx
Great choice, pre primary kids are fun and they're still young enough to (usually!) listen to adults I understand your connection to your Nan, both because of your dad and because she sounds like a lovely person.

Best of luck with it all, and best wishes for the birth of the new bub
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 9:58 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by Nat230291 View Post
Thank you so much, it was the ‘pre-primary school teacher’ that I wasn’t interested in, which is something I’ve always wanted to do, it also solves the problems of what to do with the children in summer holidays etc as I would be able to be home with them. I absolutely adore my Nan she is amazing, 91 next month and only just flew back to Australia at the beginning of December after coming to visit me and the girls. She is my best friend, we speak every other day on the phone and I truly hope one day we get to be together. I lost my dad when I was 16, and she is his mother, so she is like the last bit of my dad I have left, so have always said I will look after her for my dad. To be honest I enjoy it anyway, she brightens up any room! Xx
1. Be very careful signing up for a program in the UK - some UK-trained teachers have had difficulty getting their teaching qualifications past the AITSL skills assessment required for migration. I would recommend that you consult with a MARA-registered agent experienced with getting teachers through the skills assessment, on what your program needs to have in it, to get it by AITSL before you choose and enroll in a program. If your primary motivation for doing this is migration - you will be attracted to the quick and easy program options which will be exactly the ones AITSL is most likely to reject. It is not an easy program by any means, will require your full attention and will be emotionally draining. Be sure you understand exactly what the job requirements and work hours will be like - it isn't a 9 to 2 job with afternoons free to take care of the kids and lots of vacation time. Opposite of that, actually.

2. If you are successful in re-training and getting a visa on the back of that, be mindful that just because a profession is on the skills shortage list, that does not mean there is an actual shortage - pre-primary and primary teachers included, which are massively oversubscribed in the cities (your chances of finding quick employment are very, very, very low). Quite often the "shortage" is actually an "imbalance" (as with teaching) as there are jobs in Outback or remote areas but enormous surpluses in the cities. Be sure to have a back-up employment plan for when you arrive.

Good luck.
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 10:06 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

This is a good website to get an idea of the current jobs climate for early childhood education (another name for pre-primary). Of course, the stats provided will fluctuate but the future looks quite promising. Links to the right of the page allow you to browse current vacancies.
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers | Job Outlook
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 10:17 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
This is a good website to get an idea of the current jobs climate for early childhood education (another name for pre-primary). Of course, the stats provided will fluctuate but the future looks quite promising. Links to the right of the page allow you to browse current vacancies.
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers | Job Outlook
I don't mean this to be a negative nellie . . . but according to the site there are 36,400 pre-primary teachers in 2015, but there are going to be 46,200 by 2020 and in the interim, 50,000 openings?

By the site's own statistics that means over 100 percent turnover.

So the site is either being unbelievably rosy . . . or delivering a flashing-red warning about the profession . . . probably both.

I stand behind - with resolute firmness - my earlier advice to OP to have back-up employment options at the ready. The odds that OP rocks up to a waiting job, especially in a city, are incredibly low.
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 10:22 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Thank you for the advice, who knows then, my Nan is in Arana Hills, Brisbane.

To be honest it’s probably just a dream, the years it’ll take me to train, by the time I get to my nan she’ll be 95 if she’s here at all. Maybe had better just accept the world is shit & were not ment to be together.

Thanks for your help though
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Old Jan 5th 2018, 10:36 am
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Default Re: British citizen - can I give birth in Australia?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
I don't mean this to be a negative nellie . . . but according to the site there are 36,400 pre-primary teachers in 2015, but there are going to be 46,200 by 2020 and in the interim, 50,000 openings?

By the site's own statistics that means over 100 percent turnover.

So the site is either being unbelievably rosy . . . or delivering a flashing-red warning about the profession . . . probably both.

I stand behind - with resolute firmness - my earlier advice to OP to have back-up employment options at the ready. The odds that OP rocks up to a waiting job, especially in a city, are incredibly low.
You don't need to explain yourself or your resolute firmness It's good for people to get different ideas, in the end they'll weigh everything up and make the decision for themselves.
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