Go Back   British Expats / Working Abroad / Working Abroad by Profession / Police

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old Mar 12th 2017, 3:18 am   #16
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Calgary
Posts: 264
kate8kate0 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Ok. I thought so. Just thought I'd double check. Thanks again
Quote:
Originally Posted by powersmurf View Post
Hello.

If your boyfriend has a green card then yes, he can work do any government job, but depending on state, he will not be allowed to be a Police Officer (as per my previous post). That said if he has a green card he could do dispatch anywhere. He would have to apply, do the tests etc. You can do any civilian role really.


Hope that helps.
kate8kate0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 3:41 am   #17
Lt Col (Retd)
Premium Member
 
Pulaski's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: Dixie, ex UK
Posts: 42,909
Pulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by kate8kate0 View Post
.... Is the eb3 visa an option for him? ....
No US police department is going to sponsor someone for an EB-3 for a run-of-the-mill civilian support role job. ..... It would require thousands of dollars of visa and legal fees, not to mention waiting for several months or more, and no local government is going to shell out that sort of money to fill a job when there are plenty of people locally who could fill it for free within a week or two.
__________________
As quoted in the Grauniad.
Pulaski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 5:01 am   #18
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Calgary
Posts: 264
kate8kate0 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
No US police department is going to sponsor someone for an EB-3 for a run-of-the-mill civilian support role job. ..... It would require thousands of dollars of visa and legal fees, not to mention waiting for several months or more, and no local government is going to shell out that sort of money to fill a job when there are plenty of people locally who could fill it for free within a week or two.
Thanks for the info. I hadn't come across eb3 before and my hopes were raised a bit when I googled what this visa is this evening. But yes; also thought it would be nigh on impossible. Thanks for clarifying.

But just a thought. This visa is listed for unskilled workers too, how does that work?
kate8kate0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 5:42 am   #19
Lt Col (Retd)
Premium Member
 
Pulaski's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: Dixie, ex UK
Posts: 42,909
Pulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by kate8kate0 View Post
.... But just a thought. This visa is listed for unskilled workers too, how does that work?
That's a good question, and I doubt it happens often. For starters you need an employer to sponsor you, and I suspect that it hinges on what "unskilled" actually means, as in someone who has job skills, but not academic or professional qualifications.
__________________
As quoted in the Grauniad.
Pulaski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 6:11 am   #20
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Calgary
Posts: 264
kate8kate0 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
That's a good question, and I doubt it happens often. For starters you need an employer to sponsor you, and I suspect that it hinges on what "unskilled" actually means, as in someone who has job skills, but not academic or professional qualifications.
That's so bizarre and interesting. I have tried and find out more but cannot. Please let me know if you do? Would be interesting to know. Thank You Pulaski
kate8kate0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 8:27 am   #21
BE Enthusiast
 
vikingsail's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Nebraska by the Sea
Posts: 871
vikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

I have a different opinion. I think if you wanted to continue policing here in the US it is a viable option. Your experience will definitely count for something. However, I question whether you really want to be doing the job here as it is different as a result of that firearms thing. Most police departments require citizenship and then there is the added little bonus on their application forms that most tend to require a high school diploma or GED (equivalents are unlikely to be accepted and the cost of assessment would be prohibitive even if it were allowed). Thus, you are faced with having to take a US GED - not really an issue but more admin....

I would look closely at police dispatcher roles - they pay quite well in most counties. Also consider anything to do with investigations - doesn't have to be policing this could include compliance type work, higher education investigations etc. Possibly even private detective? That all assumes you have some CID experience, if not that might be something to consider while your still working for the Police in the UK.

Wish you well.
__________________
I live in that solitude which is painful in youth, but delicious in the years of maturity. Albert Einstein
vikingsail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 9:22 am   #22
Lt Col (Retd)
Premium Member
 
Pulaski's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: Dixie, ex UK
Posts: 42,909
Pulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by vikingsail View Post
I have a different opinion. I think if you wanted to continue policing here in the US it is a viable option. Your experience will definitely count for something. However, I question whether you really want to be doing the job here as it is different as a result of that firearms thing. Most police departments require citizenship and then there is the added little bonus on their application forms that most tend to require a high school diploma or GED (equivalents are unlikely to be accepted and the cost of assessment would be prohibitive even if it were allowed). Thus, you are faced with having to take a US GED - not really an issue but more admin....

I would look closely at police dispatcher roles - they pay quite well in most counties. Also consider anything to do with investigations - doesn't have to be policing this could include compliance type work, higher education investigations etc. Possibly even private detective? That all assumes you have some CID experience, if not that might be something to consider while your still working for the Police in the UK. .....
That's all moot if he can't get a visa.
__________________
As quoted in the Grauniad.
Pulaski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 4:42 pm   #23
BE Enthusiast
 
vikingsail's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Nebraska by the Sea
Posts: 871
vikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond reputevikingsail has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
That's all moot if he can't get a visa.
Agreed but looking beyond that as it was my read he is likely to get one just a matter of how long it takes....
__________________
I live in that solitude which is painful in youth, but delicious in the years of maturity. Albert Einstein
vikingsail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12th 2017, 6:00 pm   #24
Lt Col (Retd)
Premium Member
 
Pulaski's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: Dixie, ex UK
Posts: 42,909
Pulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: U.K. Officer to the U.S. transferring skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by vikingsail View Post
Agreed but looking beyond that as it was my read he is likely to get one just a matter of how long it takes....
Agreed. ..... I had confused this with one of the other recent "dreamer" threads. .... Therefore I agree with your comment about the job being different in the US because of "the firearms thing". One of my colleagues was a cop, who resigned after several police-linked shootings in one week in the place where he served. He has a young family and said being a police officer wasn't worth the risk.
__________________
As quoted in the Grauniad.

Last edited by Pulaski; Mar 12th 2017 at 6:04 pm.
Pulaski is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   British Expats / Working Abroad / Working Abroad by Profession / Police


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 6:31 am.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1999-2010 BritishExpats.com