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Old Sep 30th 2017, 12:22 pm   #91
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by johnwoo View Post
British terminology can vary widely in Britain depending on were you are in the UK.
Enormously. My family moved from Sheffield to Gloucester, a distance of only 140 miles and yet a number of words were totally different - off the top of my head, "buns" mean a different food product in the two places, and my mother was utterly confounded when told by the junior school in Gloucester that enrolled at, that I would need "daps".
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 12:36 pm   #92
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Enormously. My family moved from Sheffield to Gloucester, a distance of only 140 miles and yet a number of words were totally different - off the top of my head, "buns" mean a different food product in the two places, and my mother was utterly confounded when told by the junior school in Gloucester that enrolled at, that I would need "daps".
Norfolk has its own dictionary.

Speaking the Norfolk dialect: Basic Level

My grandchildren love the words Bishy barney-bee. (ladybird).
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 1:05 pm   #93
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Norfolk has its own dictionary. .....
Yorkshire has a distinct dialect, with roots in old English that mean that it is quite understandable to Dutch people.
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 3:57 pm   #94
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Default Re: British Terminology

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...mother was utterly confounded when told by the junior school in Gloucester that enrolled at, that I would need "daps".
I didn't think 'daps' was that far north.
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 4:06 pm   #95
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Belt and suspenders is also sometimes used to describe a person who is prepared, or who invariably does things in a well ordered, no-nonsense fashion. Teaching your grandma to suck eggs is the same as teaching a ghost how to haunt a house, (not necessary). These are very common terms in North America.
That's funny, it's "belt and braces" in English... Suspenders are for ladies stockings, not for trousers...
Someone who needs things to be really safe, no risk at all... "Nailed on"
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 5:05 pm   #96
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Default Re: British Terminology

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I didn't think 'daps' was that far north. .....
Gloucester is in a strange hinterland between the midlands and the south-west, not really being part of either region. Bizarrely the local TV coverage slices (or it did when I lived there) right through the center of the city - we lived east, of the city center and got local TV from Birmingham, but just a couple of miles south local TV was from Bristol. Needless to say neither region reported much from Gloucester.
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 8:03 pm   #97
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Enormously. My family moved from Sheffield to Gloucester, a distance of only 140 miles and yet a number of words were totally different - off the top of my head, "buns" mean a different food product in the two places, and my mother was utterly confounded when told by the junior school in Gloucester that enrolled at, that I would need "daps".
When I was in junior school in Bristol, corporal punishment for misbehaving was not caning, one had to go to the headmaster 'for the dap.'
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 8:14 pm   #98
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Agreed. It sounds stereotypical West Country to my ears. Men call other men 'love' in Sheffield which was a bit of a shock when I first arrived. 'Duck' as a term of affection is universal there as well.
Visiting the West Country for the first time with my soon-to-be French wife, whilst in a store, and making a purchase, the young girl serving me said, "Thanks love!"
Mlle looked at me somewhat disturbed, and said, "Who waz zat?"
I replied, "I haven't a clue", and initially had a hard time explaining that it was a popular local term of endearment.
I sometimes wonder if she still doesn't believe me.........
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 2:30 am   #99
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Default Re: British Terminology

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When I was in junior school in Bristol, corporal punishment for misbehaving was not caning, one had to go to the headmaster 'for the dap.'
Were there also rumours about sitting on Batman's lap too?

Our gym teacher used to give the dap too. The geography teacher had a T-Square called Gladys He didn't really use it, you just went to the front of the glass, bent over and you got a tap.
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 9:51 am   #100
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Tweedpipe View Post
Visiting the West Country for the first time with my soon-to-be French wife, whilst in a store, and making a purchase, the young girl serving me said, "Thanks love!"
Mlle looked at me somewhat disturbed, and said, "Who waz zat?"
I replied, "I haven't a clue", and initially had a hard time explaining that it was a popular local term of endearment.
I sometimes wonder if she still doesn't believe me.........
Funny ? 'Love' is a northern term..I thought they said 'Thanks my lurver' in the deep dark south?
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 9:53 am   #101
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Default Re: British Terminology

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I didn't think 'daps' was that far north.
If we are talking bread buns? They are called 'Baps' in Lancashire. Or 'oven bottoms' if they are flat ones
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 11:06 am   #102
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Default Re: British Terminology

How's this for British terminology.......
I'd been working overseas, and was recalled for a reposting to S.America. It was for an estimated 6months i.e. unaccompanied, so I had no choice but to leave my wife and 6yr old son behind. I moved them back to Bristol, where neither had lived before. My wife's English was just passable. Seven months later I returned to reunite with them.
They coped very well, and I noted that junior's 'Bristoleeze' was flourishing. One of the very first things my wife said was, "There are many things I didn't understand, but one in particular, and have been dying to ask you. What does 'I will 'ave your guts fur gar'ers' mean?"
Completely taken aback, I repeated, "I will have your guts for garters! Who's been saying that!!"
Junior's smile beamed from ear to ear and said, "Oh, that's the karate teacher. She's great! She's funny. She says that to all the kids!"
Without hesitation, my wife asked, "But what does it mean?"
Trying to translate that into French for her was a challenge, but I got the message across. To which she exclaimed with an expression of horror, "She's been saying that to the children!!"

Somewhat off-topic now, but probably worth a repeat.
I'm not in the habit of telling jokes at home, but one day when junior was in his late teens, whilst at the dinner table I said, "I read in the newspaper this morning that the Pope went up to Mount Olive........(pause)............and Popeye was absolutely furious!!"
After a second or two, junior almost choked with laughter. But from across the other side of the table - not even a glimmer of comprehension. I repeated the joke, and again a look of bewilderment.
Now many years later, we still have a good laugh together when I say to my son, "Mum's still not got that Popeye joke!"
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 2:00 pm   #103
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Default Re: British Terminology

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If we are talking bread buns? They are called 'Baps' in Lancashire. Or 'oven bottoms' if they are flat ones
No, daps are plimsolls. I remembered that from when we lived in Somerset.
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 2:02 pm   #104
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Default Re: British Terminology

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If we are talking bread buns? They are called 'Baps' in Lancashire. Or 'oven bottoms' if they are flat ones
No...daps as in footwear. Plimsolls.

Ah...I should have read on.

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Old Oct 1st 2017, 6:34 pm   #105
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Default Re: British Terminology

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No, daps are plimsolls. I remembered that from when we lived in Somerset.
You'd have a hard time eating those then

where on earth did they get that name from?
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