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Old Sep 29th 2017, 3:50 am   #76
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
I had 'tea' at the Ritz in 2001. I wished they advertised the possibility of seconds for the sandwiches as when they brought more I'd already had some cake after the first round.

Quite sickly eating sandwiches, cakes and then sandwiches again. Mind you, the 7 cups of Assam didn't help.
A friend of mine wandered into the Dorchester to look around and they chucked him out. I guess from his appearance he wasn't their typical guest.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 6:57 am   #77
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Default Re: British Terminology

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...taken-a-back.
That's definitely not British. Sounds distinctly rude, in fact.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 8:05 am   #78
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
I had 'tea' at the Ritz in 2001. I wished they advertised the possibility of seconds for the sandwiches as when they brought more I'd already had some cake after the first round.

Quite sickly eating sandwiches, cakes and then sandwiches again. Mind you, the 7 cups of Assam didn't help.
If you are ever in Madeira, the Reid's Palace is the place to go for afternoon tea, great service, food is excellent, sandwiches and cakes, however, there is a dress code, t-shirt, jeans and trainers will NOT get you in, , even if you have booked, and you do have to book. It's a great way to experience the way things were.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 10:58 am   #79
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Red Eric View Post
That's definitely not British. Sounds distinctly rude, in fact.
Ooops, I added a hyphen.

Taken-aback
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 11:51 am   #80
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by kimilseung View Post
Nowhere better to post this than here.
Is blacktop an Americanism, or do Brits say it too?
I have never heard it before today.
Very much an Americanism.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 12:22 pm   #81
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by kimilseung View Post
Nowhere better to post this than here.
Is blacktop an Americanism, or do Brits say it too?
I have never heard it before today.
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Originally Posted by BritInParis View Post
Very much an Americanism.


Pure Americanism. ..... Whereas "tarmac" is purely British. I have used it on occasion here in the US and just got a blank look of confusion. Asphalt works in both countries.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 12:31 pm   #82
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post


Pure Americanism. ..... Whereas "tarmac" is purely British. I have used it on occasion here in the US and just got a blank look of confusion. Asphalt works in both countries.
I have heard tarmac used in the US when referring to airports. As in " the aircraft was waiting on the tarmac".
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 1:13 pm   #83
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Default Re: British Terminology

I always thought 'queue' was British and 'line' American - strictly - but these days I notice the terms are used in both countries. Not in equal measure, but more so than before.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 1:31 pm   #84
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Default Re: British Terminology

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I have heard tarmac used in the US when referring to airports. As in " the aircraft was waiting on the tarmac".
Yes, but not macadam, pretty sure that's British. While slightly different stuff, when it is used in NA it's usually in reference to asphalt.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 2:19 pm   #85
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Shard View Post
I always thought 'queue' was British and 'line' American - strictly - but these days I notice the terms are used in both countries. Not in equal measure, but more so than before.
True. And I think 'queue' came into common US usage because of computer terminology? Not sure about this, but don't processes and actions sometimes get in a queue? (Not to confuse the words 'cue' and 'queue.')
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 2:35 pm   #86
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
True. And I think 'queue' came into common US usage because of computer terminology? Not sure about this, but don't processes and actions sometimes get in a queue? ....
Yes, but IME Americans still seem to think of "queue" as a stack of (typically virtual) work items waiting to be processed, not a line of people waiting.

I suspect that queue is a classic example of a word that most Americans know what it means when used by someone from England, but would never use it that way themselves. ... Of course it is a word that English stole from French anyway!
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 3:01 pm   #87
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
True. And I think 'queue' came into common US usage because of computer terminology? Not sure about this, but don't processes and actions sometimes get in a queue? (Not to confuse the words 'cue' and 'queue.')
Ah, good point! Cue some K for you!
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 4:52 pm   #88
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
Yes, but IME Americans still seem to think of "queue" as a stack of (typically virtual) work items waiting to be processed, not a line of people waiting.

I suspect that queue is a classic example of a word that most Americans know what it means when used by someone from England, but would never use it that way themselves. ... Of course it is a word that English stole from French anyway!
That reminds me of another American/British difference, this one in the woodwind section of the orchestra.

American - English horn
British - Cor anglais

According to the article in Wikipedia, the cor anglais was developed in Silesia around 1720. It has nothing to do with England! Supposedly, it looks like the instruments held by angels in medieval paintings, so was called "angelic horn" in German. This gradually became English/anglais in other languages.
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Last edited by robin1234; Sep 29th 2017 at 5:04 pm. Reason: Info from Wikipedia added...
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 11:02 pm   #89
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Default Re: British Terminology

Lorry/Truck (in Australia, but presumably the trucks come from American culture)

I worked in a site office for a road building project and got laughed at when I talked about all the lorries

They also looked at me askance when I asked where the safety documentation was for the JCB (Which obviously wasn't a JCB brand but flipping heck, they're all JCBs)

Plaster (as in Elastoplast), hoover and bank holiday are also all words/phrases that haven't travelled well.

Mind you, this is a country that calls its bed linen "Manchester" and its sweets "lollies" (even when they're not on a stick)
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Old Sep 30th 2017, 12:27 am   #90
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Default Re: British Terminology

British terminology can vary widely in Britain depending on were you are in the UK.
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