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Old Sep 27th 2017, 12:59 pm   #46
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
A Spike Milligan poem. Not sure when he wrote it but it's from one of his 1960s books.



Brilliant isn't it.
Somewhat different to ning nang nong, baboon and this:
Today I saw a little worm
wriggling on its belly
perhaps he’d like to come inside
and see what’s on the telly?

Great writer. Oh and I love the avatar. Was only having a T Rex marathon Spotify session just the other day. Beautiful man.
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 9:38 pm   #47
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Oakvillian View Post
Forest floor? Ocean floor? Not to mention, of course, that splendidly confounding idea of Ground Floor, which is below the first floor but above ground. Or "lower ground floor" which is a half-basement.

It is quite acceptable, and perfectly idiomatic, to use "floor" to mean the surface you walk on both indoors and out. More frequently heard in some regional applications than others, certainly, but "poor English" it is not.
In both those examples, the 'floor' is ground that has a nominal ceiling - forest floor, where there's a canopy of trees, ocean floor, covered with water - I wonder if that's the difference?
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 9:42 pm   #48
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Default Re: British Terminology

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In both those examples, the 'floor' is ground that has a nominal ceiling - forest floor, where there's a canopy of trees, ocean floor, covered with water - I wonder if that's the difference?
So explain "valley floor"!
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 12:11 am   #49
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Default Re: British Terminology

Floor is inside, ground is outside. Stop making life complicated.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 2:30 am   #50
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
Floor is inside, ground is outside. Stop making life complicated.
So what does the "G" on the button just below the "1" button in (British) lifts stand for?
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 2:45 am   #51
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
What about words that used to be just British, but now seem to be widely used in the US? Example - cul-de-sac. Formerly was not used in the US, now common currency, at least among realtors.
Soccer.
It seems to be under threat in British English as a result of its association with American English.
Many Americans I speak to are unaware that it is a borrowed word from British English, they think it is an Americanism.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 3:15 am   #52
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
So what does the "G" on the button just below the "1" button in (British) lifts stand for?
Ground Floor.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 6:02 am   #53
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Dreamy View Post
In both those examples, the 'floor' is ground that has a nominal ceiling - forest floor, where there's a canopy of trees, ocean floor, covered with water - I wonder if that's the difference?
Thats a better way of saying what I was getting at.

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Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
So explain "valley floor"!
It's English..... there are exceptions to pretty much every rule....

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Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
Floor is inside, ground is outside. Stop making life complicated.
Agreed. Decent rule of thumb.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 12:04 pm   #54
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by kimilseung View Post
Soccer.
It seems to be under threat in British English
Quite right too. It's an abomination.
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as a result of its association with American English.
Nah, it's just a horrible word.
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Many Americans I speak to are unaware that it is a borrowed word from British English, they think it is an Americanism.
Many Brits too. One of our sports teachers at school back in the 60s used to say it, but then he was Welsh and a rugby fan who called the 15 man game football, which seemed to be quite common.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 12:09 pm   #55
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Default Re: British Terminology

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.... It's English..... there are exceptions to pretty much every rule. ....
There are rules?
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 12:33 pm   #56
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by kimilseung View Post
Soccer.
It seems to be under threat in British English as a result of its association with American English.
Many Americans I speak to are unaware that it is a borrowed word from British English, they think it is an Americanism.
Closely related (etymologically) to soccer is rugger. In the US, they use the word "rugger" to mean "a rugby player." I don't think that's used in Britain, is it?

Then, Americans use the term "high tea" when they mean "afternoon tea," in the sense of tea at Claridges that costs £28 and includes finger sandwiches and petit fours. In fact high tea is something quite different.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 1:13 pm   #57
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Closely related (etymologically) to soccer is rugger. In the US, they use the word "rugger" to mean "a rugby player." I don't think that's used in Britain, is it?

Then, Americans use the term "high tea" when they mean "afternoon tea," in the sense of tea at Claridges that costs £28 and includes finger sandwiches and petit fours. In fact high tea is something quite different.
Rugger used to be used a lot. The only secondary school that played Rugby in my old home town always called it Rugger.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 1:18 pm   #58
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Rugger used to be used a lot. ...
I Britain "Rugger" is the game, Robin is saying that in the US "Rugger" is a player of the game. .... I haven't heard it used that way, but then I loathed the game and was glad to get away from it when I left th ed UK.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 1:20 pm   #59
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Default Re: British Terminology

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I Britain "Rugger" is the game, Robin is saying that in the US "Rugger" is a player of the game. .... I haven't heard it used that way, but then I loathed the game and was glad to get away from it when I left th ed UK.
Maybe the Americans are mispronouncing the word.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 1:23 pm   #60
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Dreamy View Post
In both those examples, the 'floor' is ground that has a nominal ceiling - forest floor, where there's a canopy of trees, ocean floor, covered with water - I wonder if that's the difference?
Good point.
--
I agree with moneypenny, floor inside / ground outside. That's the modern usage.
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