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Old Sep 26th 2017, 2:21 pm   #31
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by GeniB View Post
Belt and braces approach used to mean a sort of 'Heath Robinson ' affair (ok -he was a guy who made fantastical nonsense machines out of bits and pieces) It mean't you were just patching something up.Not doing a professional job

Never heard of it used in the terms the op mentioned


ETA: The Princess Bride was released 30 years ago this week. I feel old...
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 2:28 pm   #32
What year is this?
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
The floor usage you mention seems to be true, to some extent. I believe it is recent, I never heard it back in the days before I left the UK..
A Spike Milligan poem. Not sure when he wrote it but it's from one of his 1960s books.

Quote:
“If I could write words
Like leaves on an autumn forest floor,
What a bonfire my letters would make.

If I could speak words of water,
You would drown when I said
"I love you.”
Brilliant isn't it.
Somewhat different to ning nang nong, baboon and this:
Today I saw a little worm
wriggling on its belly
perhaps he’d like to come inside
and see what’s on the telly?

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Old Sep 26th 2017, 4:29 pm   #33
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
And I've never heard it used in the way you suggest.
How have you heard it used ,and in connection with what? I am going from OH who is an engineer
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 4:32 pm   #34
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
I admin on a FB page and we had a new person join. She asked me, via Messenger, to lead her through how to do something. I explained and then said for her to tell me if I was making it too simple as I didn't want to 'teach grandma to suck eggs'. I then had a thought the expression may not be known in Aus so checked with her. She said she thought it meant I'd told her to F off. Not sure how she got that out of it but even after I explained what it meant, I don't think she really got it.

Weirdly she hasn't been back and hasn't responded to anyone's messages. I don't think it was because of me.
HA HA I would think it WAS because you said that to her

In the modern idiom telling someone to go 'suck' anything is telling them to F**k off.... Silly girl.. sounds thin skinned
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 4:33 pm   #35
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Oakvillian View Post
http://gifimage.net/wp-content/uploa...word-gif-3.gif

ETA: The Princess Bride was released 30 years ago this week. I feel old...
Oh my god I LOVED that film... 'You killed my father ,prepare to die' priceless
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 4:36 pm   #36
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
What about words that used to be just British, but now seem to be widely used in the US? Example - cul-de-sac. Formerly was not used in the US, now common currency, at least among realtors.
Its' 'posh' thats why
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 6:24 pm   #37
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by GeniB View Post
How have you heard it used ,and in connection with what? I am going from OH who is an engineer
"belt and braces" is, was, and has always been an expression meaning a cautious (overcautious?) approach to risk:

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/de...elt_and_braces

The example citations are many and various:
  • Honestly, how much belt and braces does the Minister need to give himself to keep the Government safe?
  • In a belt and braces recommendation, the report suggests that people use a hands-free kit while ensuring that the phone is not placed in contact with other parts of the body.
  • I suspect it may turn out to be a belt and braces kind of problem.
  • "I have taken a belt and braces approach to make it absolutely safe and legal," he said.
  • It may be an attempt at a get out or a legal belt and braces against inevitable environmental criticism if the plan is approved.
  • I believe that my amendment does give belt and braces to ensure that in the very rare likelihood that that happened, there would at least be a court registrar or District Court judge ensuring that the proper process had taken place.
  • Yet in spite of this belt and braces approach, with those who can influence such situations expressing concerns, we had this situation.
  • It is very much a belt and braces approach in relation to derivatives.
  • But it has always been their way to make sure that things are done in a belt and braces way, very solid job, and plenty of agent, plenty of weapons, whatever weapons system they have developed they have always over-produced.
  • Of course that will not stop all viruses and there really is no reason why, on a computer costing many hundreds of pounds, you should not spend less than £50 on anti-virus software, belt and braces if you like.
  • I think that you will agree that we have taken a belt and braces approach in attempting to guarantee your worst case bottom line profit.
  • In a belt and braces move, the caveats have been removed from the Attorney General's legal advice. Lying by omission is still lying.
  • "Essentially, its a belt and braces approach," Chief Inspector Ashcroft told us.
  • But we used to have a belt and braces approach-not just detonators on the line to give an audible warning, but also a lookout, and often derailers, which would stop anything getting near the worksite.
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 6:27 pm   #38
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Default Re: British Terminology

I'm wearing both.
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 6:32 pm   #39
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Default Re: British Terminology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakvillian View Post
"belt and braces" is, was, and has always been an expression meaning a cautious (overcautious?) approach to risk:

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/de...elt_and_braces

The example citations are many and various:
  • Honestly, how much belt and braces does the Minister need to give himself to keep the Government safe?
  • In a belt and braces recommendation, the report suggests that people use a hands-free kit while ensuring that the phone is not placed in contact with other parts of the body.
  • I suspect it may turn out to be a belt and braces kind of problem.
  • "I have taken a belt and braces approach to make it absolutely safe and legal," he said.
  • It may be an attempt at a get out or a legal belt and braces against inevitable environmental criticism if the plan is approved.
  • I believe that my amendment does give belt and braces to ensure that in the very rare likelihood that that happened, there would at least be a court registrar or District Court judge ensuring that the proper process had taken place.
  • Yet in spite of this belt and braces approach, with those who can influence such situations expressing concerns, we had this situation.
  • It is very much a belt and braces approach in relation to derivatives.
  • But it has always been their way to make sure that things are done in a belt and braces way, very solid job, and plenty of agent, plenty of weapons, whatever weapons system they have developed they have always over-produced.
  • Of course that will not stop all viruses and there really is no reason why, on a computer costing many hundreds of pounds, you should not spend less than £50 on anti-virus software, belt and braces if you like.
  • I think that you will agree that we have taken a belt and braces approach in attempting to guarantee your worst case bottom line profit.
  • In a belt and braces move, the caveats have been removed from the Attorney General's legal advice. Lying by omission is still lying.
  • "Essentially, its a belt and braces approach," Chief Inspector Ashcroft told us.
  • But we used to have a belt and braces approach-not just detonators on the line to give an audible warning, but also a lookout, and often derailers, which would stop anything getting near the worksite.
You'll never persuade her. She lives in her own little world where her own rules apply!
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 6:52 pm   #40
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
What about words that used to be just British, but now seem to be widely used in the US? Example - cul-de-sac. Formerly was not used in the US, now common I believe that would be the same for EU citizens?currency, at least among realtors.
British?
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 8:42 pm   #41
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Default Re: British Terminology

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British?
I nominate a whole substrata of the English language - Cockney Rhyming Slang. Still alive & kicking.
For example A la Mode is Cockney slang for Code.
"We've got to talk a La Mode with the faces in this pub."
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 12:17 am   #42
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Default Re: British Terminology

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British?
Pleez ?
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 8:14 am   #43
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
The floor usage you mention seems to be true, to some extent. I believe it is recent, I never heard it back in the days before I left the UK. But I've heard "floor" to mean ground or roadway or pavement in eyewitness reports of accidents or terrorist events. (Bodies on the floor etc.)
That's just poor English, The floor is what is beneath your feet indoors. The ground is whats beneath your feet outdoors.
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 12:08 pm   #44
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That's just poor English, The floor is what is beneath your feet indoors. The ground is whats beneath your feet outdoors.
Forest floor? Ocean floor? Not to mention, of course, that splendidly confounding idea of Ground Floor, which is below the first floor but above ground. Or "lower ground floor" which is a half-basement.

It is quite acceptable, and perfectly idiomatic, to use "floor" to mean the surface you walk on both indoors and out. More frequently heard in some regional applications than others, certainly, but "poor English" it is not.
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Old Sep 27th 2017, 12:38 pm   #45
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Originally Posted by Oakvillian View Post
Forest floor? Ocean floor? Not to mention, of course, that splendidly confounding idea of Ground Floor, which is below the first floor but above ground. Or "lower ground floor" which is a half-basement.

It is quite acceptable, and perfectly idiomatic, to use "floor" to mean the surface you walk on both indoors and out. More frequently heard in some regional applications than others, certainly, but "poor English" it is not.
Agreed, it's not poor English. If there is such a thing as poor English...

So the etymology is interesting! floor | Origin and history of floor by Online Etymology Dictionary

"Old English flor "floor, pavement, ground, bottom (of a lake, etc.)," from Proto-Germanic *floruz "floor" (source also of Middle Dutch and Dutch vloer, Old Norse flor "floor," Middle High German vluor "floor, flooring," German Flur "field, meadow"), from PIE *plaros "flat surface" (source also of Welsh llawr "ground"),"

According to this etymology, the source of the word covers the outdoor as well as the indoor. The similar Welsh word (llawr) apparently means "ground."
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