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Old Sep 21st 2017, 12:18 pm   #16
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Default Re: British Terminology

Good thread. Nothing to add at present.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 12:25 pm   #17
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Default Re: British Terminology

I admin on a FB page and we had a new person join. She asked me, via Messenger, to lead her through how to do something. I explained and then said for her to tell me if I was making it too simple as I didn't want to 'teach grandma to suck eggs'. I then had a thought the expression may not be known in Aus so checked with her. She said she thought it meant I'd told her to F off. Not sure how she got that out of it but even after I explained what it meant, I don't think she really got it.

Weirdly she hasn't been back and hasn't responded to anyone's messages. I don't think it was because of me.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 12:42 pm   #18
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Default Re: British Terminology

Quote:
Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
I admin on a FB page and we had a new person join. She asked me, via Messenger, to lead her through how to do something. I explained and then said for her to tell me if I was making it too simple as I didn't want to 'teach grandma to suck eggs'. I then had a thought the expression may not be known in Aus so checked with her. She said she thought it meant I'd told her to F off. Not sure how she got that out of it but even after I explained what it meant, I don't think she really got it.

Weirdly she hasn't been back and hasn't responded to anyone's messages. I don't think it was because of me.
No idea what that means either. Sounds a bit old fashioned.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 1:03 pm   #19
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Default Re: British Terminology

Quote:
Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
I admin on a FB page and we had a new person join. She asked me, via Messenger, to lead her through how to do something. I explained and then said for her to tell me if I was making it too simple as I didn't want to 'teach grandma to suck eggs'. I then had a thought the expression may not be known in Aus so checked with her. She said she thought it meant I'd told her to F off. ....
Most of what you post looks like you're telling people to F off.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 1:24 pm   #20
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Default Re: British Terminology

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No idea what that means either. Sounds a bit old fashioned.
Probably Teaching someone to do something they have a lot of experience in doing.

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Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
Most of what you post looks like you're telling people to F off.
Wow, what an obnoxious thing to say. Way to piss someone off, well done.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 2:55 pm   #21
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Default Re: British Terminology

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.... Wow, what an obnoxious thing to say. Way to piss someone off, well done.
Sorry, that was like me trying to teach my grandmother to suck eggs.
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 5:26 pm   #22
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Most of what you post looks like you're telling people to F off.
Most people need to be told to F off (I'm looking at you Pulaski).
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Old Sep 21st 2017, 5:37 pm   #23
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Default Re: British Terminology

Belt and suspenders is also sometimes used to describe a person who is prepared, or who invariably does things in a well ordered, no-nonsense fashion. Teaching your grandma to suck eggs is the same as teaching a ghost how to haunt a house, (not necessary). These are very common terms in North America.
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 2:26 am   #24
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Default Re: British Terminology

Quote:
Originally Posted by moneypenny20 View Post
I admin on a FB page and we had a new person join. She asked me, via Messenger, to lead her through how to do something. I explained and then said for her to tell me if I was making it too simple as I didn't want to 'teach grandma to suck eggs'. I then had a thought the expression may not be known in Aus so checked with her. She said she thought it meant I'd told her to F off. Not sure how she got that out of it but even after I explained what it meant, I don't think she really got it.

Weirdly she hasn't been back and hasn't responded to anyone's messages. I don't think it was because of me.
Not an idion or phrase, rather a slang term: many years ago my mate from London was visiting me in Oregon; we are outside chitchatting with the neighbour (who is smoking) when my mate asks him for a "fag" . The neighbour's eyes widen and he is lost for words, and just keeps staring at my mate. I could have explained immediately what "fag" means but thought I had wait a few seconds to finish giggling.
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 8:17 am   #25
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Default Re: British Terminology

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Not an idion or phrase, rather a slang term: many years ago my mate from London was visiting me in Oregon; we are outside chitchatting with the neighbour (who is smoking) when my mate asks him for a "fag" . The neighbour's eyes widen and he is lost for words, and just keeps staring at my mate. I could have explained immediately what "fag" means but thought I had wait a few seconds to finish giggling.
Asking someone if you can "bum a fag" does have rather different connotations depending on which side of the pond you are. Luckily I don't smoke!
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 8:45 am   #26
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Default Re: British Terminology

So does "come round and knock me up in the morning".......................
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 1:04 pm   #27
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Default Re: British Terminology

The British use the word floor in place of ground, as in the earth beneath our feet. The only time I think it is used in this context in North America is in the phrase 'the forest floor'. Garden instead of yard, (we call it a garden only if used for growing vegetables or flowers). There are old threads with tons of them.
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 1:59 pm   #28
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The British use the word floor in place of ground, as in the earth beneath our feet. ....
I don't think so; at least I never did. .... Indoors, yes, outdoors, no, it is "the ground".
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 2:17 pm   #29
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Default Re: British Terminology

Quote:
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The British use the word floor in place of ground, as in the earth beneath our feet. The only time I think it is used in this context in North America is in the phrase 'the forest floor'. Garden instead of yard, (we call it a garden only if used for growing vegetables or flowers). There are old threads with tons of them.
The floor usage you mention seems to be true, to some extent. I believe it is recent, I never heard it back in the days before I left the UK. But I've heard "floor" to mean ground or roadway or pavement in eyewitness reports of accidents or terrorist events. (Bodies on the floor etc.)
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Old Sep 26th 2017, 2:20 pm   #30
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Default Re: British Terminology

What about words that used to be just British, but now seem to be widely used in the US? Example - cul-de-sac. Formerly was not used in the US, now common currency, at least among realtors.
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