Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Europe / France

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 9:40 am   #1
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Schooling in France

A recent thread has prompted me to start this one:
It concerns only French State Schools from experience, not Private nor International.

For Infant/Primary-age, enrolment at the Mairie of your Commune, armed with proof of domicile (property deed, rental receipt, utility bill...), child's Birth and Vaccination Certificates. The Mairie will allocate the school nearest your domicile if there are several in the town. Maternelle starts at 3 years old (sometimes at 2) and lasts 3 years. It's optional, but recommended as an excellent way of learning to live with others, outside the family, and making friends. Primaire (compulsory) starts at 6 when the children learn to read and write, and lasts 5 years. There's a kind of 11+ which evaluates the pupils' ability in French and Maths to go up to Collège, and a good few foreign (and French) children stay down a year (and even two...) until their level is adequate. The culture-shock upon leaving their cosy Primaire is great, even for bright French pupils, and they need a good base to start....
Collège, which lasts 4 years, at the end of which the Brevet (equivalent of O-levels) is taken, but only in three subjects: French, Maths and History/Geography/Civic Education. Without the Brevet, impossible to go up to...
Lycée, which lasts 3 years. The first year to decide which of the three Bacs to take (Science, Letters, Economy), but ALL subjects are taken, whichever Bac is chosen. The final mark is an average of all the subjects, with different coefficients depending on which Bac is chosen. Sport is examined, as well as Philosophy and the second foreign language (after English) which French pupils studied in Collège, usually Spanish or German. There are orals for the French Bac, and for each "foreign" language.
In both Collège and Lycée, pupils must be able to write essays or do exercises in French in all subjects (French Literature and Grammatical Analysis, Maths, Physics, Biology, History/Geography, the two foreign languages, and later, Philosophy,... plus the Options that they choose).
Without the Bac, impossible to be admitted to a French University.
The general consensus is that foreign children up to about 9 can learn French and adapt to the System before confronting Collège; that 10-11 year olds should be prepared to stay down in Primaire for the necessary years; and that 12-and-overs, without knowledge of French and French culture, should consider going to an International School rather than be thrown in at the deep end in a French State Collège, and even more so, Lycée.
Corrections and additions welcomed, with a view to a possible Sticky!
dmu is online now  
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 10:08 am   #2
cyrian Male
BE Forum Addict
 
cyrian's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Scotland & Touraine [37]
Posts: 2,055
cyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond reputecyrian has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

I think that it is worth mentioning that vaccinations are compulsory and that 3rd party insurance is also required.
What proof of vaccinations is required and where you can obtain the insurance.
cyrian is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 10:23 am   #3
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Another point for any one whose children are in 2nde (first year Lycée).
From experience, a Bac L doesn't open many doors for a future career, unless the pupil wants to teach, do law, psychology..... My younger daughter chose Bac L since she was (still is) hopeless in Maths, but there was very little choice in University courses leading to other professions.
Best to choose a Bac S which will open countless, not necessarily scientific, doors, or Bac ES (Economy) (but only if the pupil is that way inclined).
dmu is online now  
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 10:32 am   #4
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyrian View Post
I think that it is worth mentioning that vaccinations are compulsory and that 3rd party insurance is also required.
What proof of vaccinations is required and where you can obtain the insurance.
True, there have been threads in the past where UK parents refuse vaccinations.
They are indeed compulsory (isn't there a written record in the UK, like the Carnet de Santé in France?), as is Assurance Scolaire. The latter is obtained as soon as the child is enrolled - the school will give the names of the main Insurance Companies specialising in school insurance, which ranges from the minimum in-school and school outings, to 365-day annual coverage, and the respective premium is reasonable.
dmu is online now  
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 2:50 pm   #5
BE Enthusiast
 
loy loy's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Lot et Garonne
Posts: 576
loy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to allloy loy is a name known to all
Default Re: Schooling in France

Our daughter has just started college. There is not a test as such in CM2 to get into college. But the students are assessed for all the classes CP - CM2 to gain access to the next level. Some children can be held back, just as some can advance.
Her vaccinations were checked, I assume as the UK. They used the UK red book and she needed a tetanus booster which she had.
Your child need not go to the local school. Ours don't. But we needed permission from the Mairie in the village where they school for them to go there and not ask our village for the money
loy loy is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2015, 6:47 pm   #6
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: 32 Gers ; Between Toulouse and Auch
Posts: 1,395
dennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond reputedennerlymum has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

For me yes vaccinations - but TB is no longer compulsory - children have to have tetracoc - tetanus , typhoid, diptheria every 5 years

I agree about the BAC S but think ahead if your child wishes to go to the uk to study - a few kids in my daughter's class did BAC S then applied to read law in the uk - all failed to get an offer as the uk couldn't understand why they were studying sciences!!

Also BAC S is by its very nature very scientific and our daughter found the maths/ physics content very hard - to the extent that it nearly lowered her overall grade to the point where she didnt get her grades for uni ...

luckily in France all subjects count and she excelled in those and so scraped through
__________________
www.inlingua31.fr
dennerlymum is offline  
Old Nov 8th 2015, 4:49 pm   #7
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Home-schooling
There's an ongoing thread in another BE forum about home-schooling, and the tone of the discussion is becoming heated. This and a recent thread on the France forum has prompted me to post this addition, simply giving facts.
It may be legal and commonplace in the UK, but in France it's only tolerated under certain conditions and not widespread, despite claims on unofficial sites.
The Authorities (Mairie and Regional Académie) must be informed, and Inspectors come regularly to check that the children's level keeps up with that of their peers. This obviously means that the parent(s) must be capable of teaching their children everything in the French Curriculum to enable them to pass the Brevet at about 14, and the Bac at about 17. Bearing in mind all the subjects taken at the Bac (cf above), this would be a daunting venture even for French parents who have gone through Primaire-Collège-Lycée themselves and know what's expected.
If any one has started home-schooling and/or has successfully brought their children to Bac passes, please feel free to post!
dmu is online now  
Old Nov 8th 2015, 8:22 pm   #8
Quien no sabe
 
Chatter Static's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 3,277
Chatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond reputeChatter Static has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmu View Post
Home-schooling
There's an ongoing thread in another BE forum about home-schooling, and the tone of the discussion is becoming heated. This and a recent thread on the France forum has prompted me to post this addition, simply giving facts.
It may be legal and commonplace in the UK, but in France it's only tolerated under certain conditions and not widespread, despite claims on unofficial sites.
The Authorities (Mairie and Regional Académie) must be informed, and Inspectors come regularly to check that the children's level keeps up with that of their peers. This obviously means that the parent(s) must be capable of teaching their children everything in the French Curriculum to enable them to pass the Brevet at about 14, and the Bac at about 17. Bearing in mind all the subjects taken at the Bac (cf above), this would be a daunting venture even for French parents who have gone through Primaire-Collège-Lycée themselves and know what's expected.
If any one has started home-schooling and/or has successfully brought their children to Bac passes, please feel free to post!
I think anyone that would want to homeschool the French curriculum should first have their head tested. Because if your not already mental you will be by the end of it.

I still cant get my head round learning using poésie's....
__________________
I have seen the other side and my advice is don't pack sunscreen.
Chatter Static is offline  
Old Nov 9th 2015, 8:19 am   #9
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

The CNED
Formation tout au long de la vie - CNED
is available to guide and help parents teach their children at home, but primarily those children who can't attend school for health reasons. Older students and adults are also able to follow courses for various reasons.
Any prospective expat homeschooler should study this site, which follows the French Curriculum for the compulsory 6-16 years, and indicates what a pupil must know in all subjects at the end of each year. If the parent(s) can do this (in French), then all well and good, but they must be aware that if the child's level isn't adequate, the Inspector will require them to attend school.
dmu is online now  
Old Nov 16th 2015, 5:51 pm   #10
OkUK 
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 52
OkUK is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmu View Post
Another point for any one whose children are in 2nde (first year Lycée).
From experience, a Bac L doesn't open many doors for a future career, unless the pupil wants to teach, do law, psychology..... My younger daughter chose Bac L since she was (still is) hopeless in Maths, but there was very little choice in University courses leading to other professions.
Best to choose a Bac S which will open countless, not necessarily scientific, doors, or Bac ES (Economy) (but only if the pupil is that way inclined).
Bac L is becoming much more general, I don't know when your daughter did it. I'm currently at the stage where I choose, they're very lenient. It's all about motivation now, even if you have 8/20 in Maths, as long as you're motivated in Science subjects you can do a Bac S.

They rarely oppose your decision. That said, you can of course fail the next year if you're really quite bad at everything.
OkUK is offline  
Old Nov 16th 2015, 6:33 pm   #11
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by OkUK View Post
Bac L is becoming much more general, I don't know when your daughter did it. I'm currently at the stage where I choose, they're very lenient. It's all about motivation now, even if you have 8/20 in Maths, as long as you're motivated in Science subjects you can do a Bac S.

They rarely oppose your decision. That said, you can of course fail the next year if you're really quite bad at everything.
You should think of where you intend to study in the future, and what.
As Dennerlymum says above, a British Uni would look askance at an applicant with a Bac S for a Law Degree, for example, and, from what you've said in another thread, it doesn't sound as though you intend to remain in France.
Good luck with your future studies!
dmu is online now  
Old Nov 16th 2015, 6:57 pm   #12
OkUK 
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 52
OkUK is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Schooling in France

Thanks!
OkUK is offline  
Old Nov 16th 2015, 8:50 pm   #13
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 365
babyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond reputebabyposer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmu View Post
Another point for any one whose children are in 2nde (first year Lycée).
From experience, a Bac L doesn't open many doors for a future career, unless the pupil wants to teach, do law, psychology..... My younger daughter chose Bac L since she was (still is) hopeless in Maths, but there was very little choice in University courses leading to other professions.
What's her job now dmu?
babyposer is offline  
Old Nov 16th 2015, 9:29 pm   #14
dmu Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hérault (34)
Posts: 6,442
dmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond reputedmu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by babyposer View Post
What's her job now dmu?
As a matter of fact, she's just returned to France after working in Eco-tourism overseas, and is at crossroads at the moment. If there's nothing doing in France (LOL), she'll look elsewhere where she speaks the language (hopefully in Europe this time).
dmu is online now  
Old Nov 17th 2015, 8:58 am   #15
BE Forum Addict
 
Tweedpipe's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Halfway between Ricard & Absynthe
Posts: 2,905
Tweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond reputeTweedpipe has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling in France

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmu View Post
As a matter of fact, she's just returned to France after working in Eco-tourism overseas, and is at crossroads at the moment. If there's nothing doing in France (LOL), she'll look elsewhere where she speaks the language (hopefully in Europe this time).
I know it's so tempting to keep them tied close to home, but has she considered Montreal? Our son, with a freshly obtained Bac ES in his (bac? pocket) raced away to Canada to further his education, and to especially benefit from the bi-lingual nature of the generally very safe community, good job prospects, ease of finding good, relatively inexpensive rental accommodation etc. And he's never looked back, apart from wishing he still had good wine and Camembert at French prices!
And with direct seasonal flights from Toulouse we get to see him far more frequently than we ever imagined.
__________________
.....Sent from my Sinclair ZX81.....
"I can certainly see that you know your wine. Most of the guests who stay here wouldn’t know the difference between Bordeaux and Claret." - Basil Fawlty, Fawlty Towers
Tweedpipe is offline  
Closed Thread

Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Europe / France


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 9:28 am.


Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1999-2010 BritishExpats.com