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Old Nov 1st 2008, 4:23 pm   #91
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Default Re: practical exam theory

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Originally Posted by steve`o View Post
just remember where the royalty cheques go
hello steve'o

I have tried for Electrical Mechanic but TRA offering only Electrical Fitter trade test.

I am going to appear trade test of Electrical Fitter.

Please suggest, how can I get an Electrical mechanic license after passing trade test of Electrical Fitter
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Old Nov 14th 2008, 7:49 pm   #92
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Hi guys, this is my first post on this forum so I want it to be a good one.
I have been reading this thread for a while and it is now time to give something back.
I took the practical on the 30th Oct and have just received a successful outcome so here is what I can remember of the day:

don't know if the assessment is identical each time or if the same assessors are used but my assessment was as follows:

After registration we all went to a classroom and sat a written exam- 20 multiple choice questions which were largely around calculating resistances (Rt = R1 + R2 type thing) currents and power. A little RMS (just to check you know about peak voltages). A few very simple questions that you wouldn't look twice at and as a result I have already forgotten what they were. Total inductive reactance when you have 2 inductors in series (values given so you don't really need to remember all your RLC formulae but I found knowing it helped). Power factor and the relationships between the various values from the power triangle (KW, KVA, KVAr). POwer factor lagging or leading and correction- Amps used. Total power on an evenly loaded 3-phase system in star.
I can't remember if there was anything else but it is multiple choice which always helps. There were a couple of tricks in there so read carefully and double check your answers. They gave plenty of time.

After this we were split into 2 groups of 5 and went off to a workshop for the practical. Each in our own cubicle (you remember from college) we had to wire a 2-way lighting circuit and a radial socket circuit with one outlet. This should be doddle for any jobbing spark. The only thing was that it had to be to specific measurements given. this was partly clipped direct and partly in plastic conduit of which one piece had a double set so practice bending.
This was all wired back to a consumer unit via RCBO's and a few simple tests carried out and results recorded (earth continuity, insulation resistance and polarity)

During this we were taken individually to do the other elements of the practical.
The main part which seemed to have the most significance to them was the disconnect reconnect procedure (included in the generic candidate kit). My assessor was happy for us to use the sheet as we went through it because it is part of their system that we have to qualify in when we get to Oz. Apparently some assessors don't let you do this so this is a good thing to learn. If you have your own lock off devices and tags this does impress (I was the only one who had any and credit was received).

Also we had to prove we knew the basics with regard to DOL starting and the difference between star and delta (motor windings). The drawing was given to work from to wire a very basic DOL circuit with a contactor. The course I did definitely helped me in this area but I think I could have found all the information I needed without spending £1500. He asked where in the circuit I would put an additional stop button and start button (stop in series and start in parallel). It was simplified far more than I expected.

The last practical element was connecting a few banana leads to a box to simulate the connections of a circuitdiagram containing some resistors in series and parallel and then explaining where I would connect to read the current over various resistors and the same for voltage.

The last thing I had to do was write a paragraph explaining what I do that proves my experience within a certain area (described as Bu****it by the assessor).


I think that about sums it up and I hope it helps those of you who are as nervous as I was. Good luck
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Old Nov 14th 2008, 9:03 pm   #93
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan-Sharon View Post
Hi guys, this is my first post on this forum so I want it to be a good one.
I have been reading this thread for a while and it is now time to give something back.
I took the practical on the 30th Oct and have just received a successful outcome so here is what I can remember of the day:

don't know if the assessment is identical each time or if the same assessors are used but my assessment was as follows:

After registration we all went to a classroom and sat a written exam- 20 multiple choice questions which were largely around calculating resistances (Rt = R1 + R2 type thing) currents and power. A little RMS (just to check you know about peak voltages). A few very simple questions that you wouldn't look twice at and as a result I have already forgotten what they were. Total inductive reactance when you have 2 inductors in series (values given so you don't really need to remember all your RLC formulae but I found knowing it helped). Power factor and the relationships between the various values from the power triangle (KW, KVA, KVAr). POwer factor lagging or leading and correction- Amps used. Total power on an evenly loaded 3-phase system in star.
I can't remember if there was anything else but it is multiple choice which always helps. There were a couple of tricks in there so read carefully and double check your answers. They gave plenty of time.

After this we were split into 2 groups of 5 and went off to a workshop for the practical. Each in our own cubicle (you remember from college) we had to wire a 2-way lighting circuit and a radial socket circuit with one outlet. This should be doddle for any jobbing spark. The only thing was that it had to be to specific measurements given. this was partly clipped direct and partly in plastic conduit of which one piece had a double set so practice bending.
This was all wired back to a consumer unit via RCBO's and a few simple tests carried out and results recorded (earth continuity, insulation resistance and polarity)

During this we were taken individually to do the other elements of the practical.
The main part which seemed to have the most significance to them was the disconnect reconnect procedure (included in the generic candidate kit). My assessor was happy for us to use the sheet as we went through it because it is part of their system that we have to qualify in when we get to Oz. Apparently some assessors don't let you do this so this is a good thing to learn. If you have your own lock off devices and tags this does impress (I was the only one who had any and credit was received).

Also we had to prove we knew the basics with regard to DOL starting and the difference between star and delta (motor windings). The drawing was given to work from to wire a very basic DOL circuit with a contactor. The course I did definitely helped me in this area but I think I could have found all the information I needed without spending £1500. He asked where in the circuit I would put an additional stop button and start button (stop in series and start in parallel). It was simplified far more than I expected.

The last practical element was connecting a few banana leads to a box to simulate the connections of a circuitdiagram containing some resistors in series and parallel and then explaining where I would connect to read the current over various resistors and the same for voltage.

The last thing I had to do was write a paragraph explaining what I do that proves my experience within a certain area (described as Bu****it by the assessor).


I think that about sums it up and I hope it helps those of you who are as nervous as I was. Good luck
where did you take the exam? was your assessor the short guy with the baseball cap?
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Old Nov 15th 2008, 7:47 am   #94
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Default Re: practical exam theory

I did it in London and the guy was the one with the basesall cap. (I can't remember his name).
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Old Nov 15th 2008, 4:47 pm   #95
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan-Sharon View Post
I did it in London and the guy was the one with the basesall cap. (I can't remember his name).
think you were doing the install next to me, anyway, well done!
i passed as well!!
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Old Nov 15th 2008, 7:27 pm   #96
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Nice one!
After months of worrying that should be the hard part over with.
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Old Nov 16th 2008, 5:37 pm   #97
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Default Re: practical exam theory

As you know I am new to this forum,

Someone sent me a private message and I have only now allowed popups from this site so I am afraid I may have lost it without reading so whoever you are please try again and I will reply.
Technology can sometimes be a bit tricky!

Thanks.
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Old Jan 1st 2009, 8:34 am   #98
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Hi Everyone,

I am here in New South Wales, Australia as an Electrician ( 457 visa -sponsored ) and I am scheduled to sit on my ARTC exam on the first week of February 2009. I had my assessment through the TRA, not Vetassess. My question is, will I be given the same set of theoretical and practical exams you have been discussing here?

Thanks

Alex
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Old Jan 1st 2009, 1:11 pm   #99
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Hi Mate,The exam you are doing is different to the vetasses trade test i did,i dont know the ins and outs of ARTC 457 VISA,i cant tell you wether the skills to be performed in that particular test will be the same as you are doing it in oz and mine was offshore,do you have a current oz licence and are employed in the electrical industry there also is that visa an employer sponsorship visa.sorry i couldnt be more help. Ian (easter)

PS Happy New Year.
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Old Jan 2nd 2009, 7:04 am   #100
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Easter View Post
Hi Mate,The exam you are doing is different to the vetasses trade test i did,i dont know the ins and outs of ARTC 457 VISA,i cant tell you wether the skills to be performed in that particular test will be the same as you are doing it in oz and mine was offshore,do you have a current oz licence and are employed in the electrical industry there also is that visa an employer sponsorship visa.sorry i couldnt be more help. Ian (easter)

PS Happy New Year.
I was assessed by TRA as a General Electrician 4311-11 for immigration purposes (Employer sponsored-457 visa). With this TRA assessment, I am allowed to work as an electrician here in NSW (only) for my sponsoring employer. I still don't have an Oz electrical license but the law allows me to work as an electrician under the supervision/"using the license" of the Company or a licensed electrician. I still have to sit for the ARTC trade test and go to PEER for the wiring rules to get a license.

I hope somebody here could give me an idea about my ARTC trade test first week of Feb. Thanks.
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Old Jan 2nd 2009, 11:37 am   #101
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Default Re: practical exam theory

If you get in touch with Kate Boneham at PEER VEET i am sure she can put you straight or direct in the right direction ( [email protected]) hope you find what your looking for.
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Old Jan 24th 2009, 12:11 am   #102
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Easter View Post
If you get in touch with Kate Boneham at PEER VEET i am sure she can put you straight or direct in the right direction ( [email protected]) hope you find what your looking for.
Hi guys, doing the practical/theory in Feb in Blackburn..the London one was full. Been reading this thread massively since starting this trail, some great tips & helps.
Like most people the thing I'm apprehensive about is the DOL/motors part of the practical. Can pretty much cover the theory side of it, but the connecting part of it is the bit that is worrying me.
Correct me if I'm wrong but, most DOL starters come with the interconnecting links already installed so that you just connect the supply and the load to the appropriate terminals - in the practicals do you have to wire in all the links to connect the start/stop and A1/A2 coil terminals?
Help appreciated on this.
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Old Jan 24th 2009, 12:35 am   #103
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Excellent thread this, many thanks to all who have contributed thus far. Doing my practicals Feb19th & am swotting up nearly everyday - doing RLC circuit equations in my sleep

As with most sparks on here the motor side of things is the most worrying bit. Has anyone got any ideas on how to get some hands-on revision. I mean it's great we have all the diagramatic info to look at courtesy of SteveO, but I don't want to turn up and not recognise the damn thing when it comes to it.

Long time since I did my apprenticeship & connected up motors, feels like a new subject at the moment.

Thought about buying a DOL from the wholesalers just to familiarise myself again but not sure if that's a waste of cash.

Help appreciated....Alan
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Old Jan 25th 2009, 10:49 am   #104
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Default Re: practical exam theory

If you can read the most basic of wiring diagrams then you wont have a problem. On the london exam, all the components were laid out individualy on a desk.

Take a peice of brown singles - One end connects in to a 24v power supply the other connects in to stop, out of stop and in to start, out of start and in to overload 95, out of overload 96 and in to A1.
Make the parallel hold on connection from either side of the start, over to 13 and 14 on the contactor then connect a blue wire from A2 to the power supply. Try drawing a circuit from this example.

No pre fitted links etc just the bare components. In my opinion looking at technical handbook drawings will just cloud things if you are unfamiliar with a DOL starter, as I was. Keep it simple.











Quote:
Originally Posted by EssexSparks View Post
Excellent thread this, many thanks to all who have contributed thus far. Doing my practicals Feb19th & am swotting up nearly everyday - doing RLC circuit equations in my sleep

As with most sparks on here the motor side of things is the most worrying bit. Has anyone got any ideas on how to get some hands-on revision. I mean it's great we have all the diagramatic info to look at courtesy of SteveO, but I don't want to turn up and not recognise the damn thing when it comes to it.

Long time since I did my apprenticeship & connected up motors, feels like a new subject at the moment.

Thought about buying a DOL from the wholesalers just to familiarise myself again but not sure if that's a waste of cash.

Help appreciated....Alan
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Old Jan 25th 2009, 4:41 pm   #105
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Default Re: practical exam theory

Cheers Jon, if it's as straight forward as that I should be ok. Is the motor connected up? I've read they don't bother with that bit. And as for the fault they put on, is it just a case of seeing which part of the drawing they've messed up?
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