Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Canada

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old Apr 20th 2010, 9:27 pm   #1
Forum Regular
 
Tiger_Quimpo's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Morgan Heights, Surrey, BC.
Posts: 85
Tiger_Quimpo will become famous soon enoughTiger_Quimpo will become famous soon enough
Default Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

We are looking to move to Vancouver in Spring of next year. We have a friend who, like us, has a son with Asperger's. He was in mainstream school here, but not accepted by mainstream school in Calgary. Our friend has twice (and currently) lived in Calgary. She's been on the phone to my wife desparate to come back because her son is not coping well in Canada.

Now our son is doing really well in mainstream school here and we are optimistic about his ability to adapt to a new (similarly switched on) school in Vancouver (South Surrey/White Rock in BC).

My question (prompted by our friend's experience) is this - is there anything fundamentally different about the education system in Canada (BC specifically) that we should worry about in respect to my son's mainstream education? Are they less switch on, less understanding or less willing to support children with Asperger's than they are here in the UK?

I realise this is a specialist question and few of you may have real world experience of this, but I'd appreciate any relevant views and experiences that might help us worry a little less about the impact of our move on my son, who as I say is coping well now (he receives and requires no additional class room support - in fact he's a good bit smarter than his old man).

Thanks in advance.
__________________
FSW1 sent 18/11/09 / 120 day rec'd 04/02/10 / Docs sent 05/03/10 / AOR 15/03/10 / In Process 12/08/10 / Med Reqs 17/09/10 bit of a wait ... PPR - 04/07/11 / Landed Sept 2011 & PR Cards arrived 01 Nov 2011.
Tiger_Quimpo is offline  
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 20th 2010, 10:47 pm   #2
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: North Vancouver BC (tiz a long way away from devon)
Posts: 799
jerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud ofjerry brewer has much to be proud of
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Hi
I know it's not the same, but my boy has adhd, and the whole approach over here in schools is totally different from the UK.
Here is not a 'naughty boy', here he gets assistance and given the benefit of the doubt, we get very little grief from the school, unlike the UK ...
And his class results, to us, prove the different approach works.
Cheers
Jerry
jerry brewer is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 11:52 am   #3
Assimilated Pauper
 
dbd33's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 30,753
dbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Since Asperger's is a spectrum I don't know what level of function you expect your child to achieve. If you have doubts about his ultimate ability to work, to live alone, to function as an independent adult, then I would say think very hard about moving to Canada. I would say that one could reasonable summarise state support for dysfunctional adults in Canada as being bugger all; you'd have to work out what to do with him. If, on the other hand, the level of Asperger's is such that, as an adult, he would be thought "a bit odd" but would be able to work outside a sheltered facility, perhaps in a field such as computing, then I don't think there's any cause for concern.
dbd33 is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 12:59 pm   #4
~~Checksum~~
Moderator
 
Siouxie's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: "The Hammer" SW Ontario
Posts: 8,281
Siouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond reputeSiouxie has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

There appears to be a lot of websites for the Vancouver area dealing with Autism / Aspergers Syndrom.

BC: Individual Education Planning for Students with Special Needs

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/iepssn.htm (Pdf files to download on the website).

"... A board must provide a student with special needs with an educational program in a
classroom where that student is integrated with other students who do not have special needs,
unless the educational needs of the student with special needs or other students indicate that the
educational program for the student with special needs should be provided otherwise..."


The Autism Society of Canada have this information on Education:

http://www.autismsocietycanada.ca/ap...s/index_e.html

The Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

Students with ASD are all individuals with unique strengths and weaknesses when it comes to learning. They may be average, above-average or below average in terms of cognitive ability and they will each have unique social functioning abilities, communication challenges and special skills and abilities as well.

For a student with a developmental disability, the IEP is the cornerstone of the student's education. The IEP is a written statement of the educational program and adapted curriculum that identifies academic goals for the individual and the services and accommodations needed for optimum growth and learning during the school year. It will depend on an evaluation component and should include targets for re-evaluation. When planning an IEP, parents play a vital role in identifying skills, areas of strength, challenges and needs, all of which will be critical to a child's well-being and future development.

The long-term (ideal) goal for most students with an ASD is successful inclusion in typical school settings. Research suggests that many students with ASDs have the most independent outcomes if they first receive specialized instruction within the context of an evidence-based effective treatment program. This usually begins with segregated individualized treatment, and progresses toward increased independence and comfort in typical and inclusive settings. For some people this process can take years but the rate of progress will vary with each individual.


You may be able to find more information from one of the organisations listed.

http://www.autismawarenesscentre.org...-columbia.html

http://www.autismbc.ca/pdfs/Services%20Guide.PDF

http://aspires.ca/Resources.html

__________________
"Checksums are often used to verify data integrity"

http://www.suzisukarma.com/gallery.html .. Share the moments - share the memories - share the love!

Last edited by Siouxie; Apr 21st 2010 at 1:03 pm.
Siouxie is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 1:17 pm   #5
Assimilated Pauper
 
dbd33's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 30,753
dbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond reputedbd33 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by siouxie View Post
The long-term (ideal) goal for most students with an ASD is successful inclusion in typical school settings.
Which is fine, as far as it goes. My comments above refer to the slight problem that, at age 21, all of that stops. If the person with the developmental disability is not, at that point, a functioning adult, then that person is, for all practical purposes the family's problem. This is fundamentally different from European countries where it is acknowledged that the state bears responsibilty for citizens who are unable to look after themselves.

I hope my concerns do not apply in this case but parents of a potentially permanently disabled person who are considering a move to Canada should give this some thought; they may need great gobs of money.
dbd33 is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 3:44 pm   #6
softypath
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 5,894
ExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

I have a friend with a child with learning difficulties who ended up sending him to a private school. It's called Gordon something.

ANyway, the public school flat out told her they could not help her with her child's needs due to funding cuts. Nearly all the school districts are in debt; jobs etc. Special education funding was cut by the province a while ago, and families like my friend's are having to find the money to send their kids private.

All school districts are different, so your best bet is to figure out where you're going to live and talk to people in that school district.
ExKiwilass is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 3:48 pm   #7
I am your god...
Premium Member
 
Alan2005's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 13,077
Alan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwilass View Post
I have a friend with a child with learning difficulties who ended up sending him to a private school. It's called Gordon something.

ANyway, the public school flat out told her they could not help her with her child's needs due to funding cuts. Nearly all the school districts are in debt; jobs etc. Special education funding was cut by the province a while ago, and families like my friend's are having to find the money to send their kids private.

All school districts are different, so your best bet is to figure out where you're going to live and talk to people in that school district.
Massive school cuts are certainly all over the news here (it's been one of the main headlines for a few weeks now) lots of extra program cuts and layoffs all over apparently. Although I don't know what people expected to happen after running deficits and hosting the olympics in a recession.
Alan2005 is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 7:36 pm   #8
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 10,148
JonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan2005 View Post
Massive school cuts are certainly all over the news here (it's been one of the main headlines for a few weeks now) lots of extra program cuts and layoffs all over apparently. Although I don't know what people expected to happen after running deficits and hosting the olympics in a recession.

Funding in 2008/9 was $b4.467. 2009/10 budgeted at $b4.551, 2010/11 $b4.663 and 2011/12 $b4.721.

For the last several years the school age population has been declining between 1% and 2% a year. (The BCTF are forecasting the decline will halt in 2011).

Funding is not an issue or a problem.
__________________
Any reference to tax above is for general interest only and is not intended as professional advice.
JonboyE is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 7:55 pm   #9
softypath
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 5,894
ExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

I know what you're getting at Jon, but I am getting so frustrated with this situation. I just want enough damn funding for my local bloody public school, so that my school district isn't in debt and threatening to cut services.

Dammit.

ExKiwilass is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 7:58 pm   #10
I am your god...
Premium Member
 
Alan2005's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 13,077
Alan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonboyE View Post
Funding in 2008/9 was $b4.467. 2009/10 budgeted at $b4.551, 2010/11 $b4.663 and 2011/12 $b4.721.

For the last several years the school age population has been declining between 1% and 2% a year. (The BCTF are forecasting the decline will halt in 2011).

Funding is not an issue or a problem.
Yeah, well tell that to these people:
http://www.news1130.com/news/local/a...ool-board-cuts

They think there is an issue and a problem. You could tell them that funding has increased, but that will mean nothing to them as the programs their kids use are still being cut. With all things government, you have to watch what it actually does, not what it says.

Edit: I don't doubt your figures, but increased funding with decreasing services doesn't make sense. Somebody is lying and/or incompetent which I guess is to be expected.

Last edited by Alan2005; Apr 21st 2010 at 8:08 pm.
Alan2005 is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 8:03 pm   #11
softypath
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 5,894
ExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond reputeExKiwilass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

So, fine. They want the public schools to compete. I don't have a problem with that. Mine has finally got it together, the principal and teachers have worked hard and attracted 20 kids from the private system and a bunch from Van school district/other districts. So they're actually bringing money BACK into the public system for our district. We have a waitlist for K this year. That's never happened before.

And then they get cuts. Nice, thanks a lot. FRUSTRATING.
ExKiwilass is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 8:33 pm   #12
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 10,148
JonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond reputeJonboyE has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan2005 View Post
Edit: I don't doubt your figures, but increased funding with decreasing services doesn't make sense. Somebody is lying and/or incompetent which I guess is to be expected.
Part of the problem is that school boards are elected. It is the bottom rung of the political ladder.

It suits the (currently) left dominated boards to create the impression that a right wing government is cutting education funding. Being the overtly cynical type that I am I would not be in the slightest bit surprised to learn that some school boards are choosing to cut headline grabbing programs - like special needs - rather than carry out the proper administration they are elected to do.

Things change. Populations, demographics, societal needs. What is needed is careful and continuous management of change. The difficulty we have now is that the media agenda is being driven by the school boards and the BCTF who both have a deeply rooted interest in maintaining the status quo.

It is one of those wonderful ironies in life that the progressive left turn out to be the most conservative of people.
__________________
Any reference to tax above is for general interest only and is not intended as professional advice.
JonboyE is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 8:42 pm   #13
I am your god...
Premium Member
 
Alan2005's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 13,077
Alan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond reputeAlan2005 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonboyE View Post
Part of the problem is that school boards are elected. It is the bottom rung of the political ladder.

It suits the (currently) left dominated boards to create the impression that a right wing government is cutting education funding. Being the overtly cynical type that I am I would not be in the slightest bit surprised to learn that some school boards are choosing to cut headline grabbing programs - like special needs - rather than carry out the proper administration they are elected to do.

Things change. Populations, demographics, societal needs. What is needed is careful and continuous management of change. The difficulty we have now is that the media agenda is being driven by the school boards and the BCTF who both have a deeply rooted interest in maintaining the status quo.

It is one of those wonderful ironies in life that the progressive left turn out to be the most conservative of people.
Well logically speaking they should cut as 2% less kids = 2% less real terms funding required (I know it's not quite that, but it's probably close enough).
This level of cut should be possible without any loss of services at all. If it's not possible without program cuts or school boards getting into debt then the current level of funding is either too low or has been spent badly. I have no idea which of those it is - probably a bit of both.
Alan2005 is offline  
Old Apr 21st 2010, 9:00 pm   #14
Forum Regular
 
Tiger_Quimpo's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Morgan Heights, Surrey, BC.
Posts: 85
Tiger_Quimpo will become famous soon enoughTiger_Quimpo will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Quote:
Originally Posted by siouxie View Post
There appears to be a lot of websites for the Vancouver area dealing with Autism / Aspergers Syndrom.

BC: Individual Education Planning for Students with Special Needs

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/iepssn.htm (Pdf files to download on the website).

"... A board must provide a student with special needs with an educational program in a
classroom where that student is integrated with other students who do not have special needs,
unless the educational needs of the student with special needs or other students indicate that the
educational program for the student with special needs should be provided otherwise..."


The Autism Society of Canada have this information on Education:

http://www.autismsocietycanada.ca/ap...s/index_e.html

The Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

Students with ASD are all individuals with unique strengths and weaknesses when it comes to learning. They may be average, above-average or below average in terms of cognitive ability and they will each have unique social functioning abilities, communication challenges and special skills and abilities as well.

For a student with a developmental disability, the IEP is the cornerstone of the student's education. The IEP is a written statement of the educational program and adapted curriculum that identifies academic goals for the individual and the services and accommodations needed for optimum growth and learning during the school year. It will depend on an evaluation component and should include targets for re-evaluation. When planning an IEP, parents play a vital role in identifying skills, areas of strength, challenges and needs, all of which will be critical to a child's well-being and future development.

The long-term (ideal) goal for most students with an ASD is successful inclusion in typical school settings. Research suggests that many students with ASDs have the most independent outcomes if they first receive specialized instruction within the context of an evidence-based effective treatment program. This usually begins with segregated individualized treatment, and progresses toward increased independence and comfort in typical and inclusive settings. For some people this process can take years but the rate of progress will vary with each individual.


You may be able to find more information from one of the organisations listed.

http://www.autismawarenesscentre.org...-columbia.html

http://www.autismbc.ca/pdfs/Services%20Guide.PDF

http://aspires.ca/Resources.html

Just working my way through the responses here, but wanted to reply to Siouxie to say thanks for such a comprehensive reply and all the links. It's much appreciated. Thanks all for taking the time.

Footnote: We have very high hopes for our son's future as an independent adult. I'm sure he'll always be considered a little bit eccentric, but to us his eccentricty if a huge part of his charm.
__________________
FSW1 sent 18/11/09 / 120 day rec'd 04/02/10 / Docs sent 05/03/10 / AOR 15/03/10 / In Process 12/08/10 / Med Reqs 17/09/10 bit of a wait ... PPR - 04/07/11 / Landed Sept 2011 & PR Cards arrived 01 Nov 2011.
Tiger_Quimpo is offline  
Old Apr 22nd 2010, 3:01 am   #15
Never ever sure
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,151
stepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond reputestepnek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Schooling a child with Asperger's in Vancouver

Whilst appreciating that the OP's concern focused on BC I'd just like to mention that our 6 year old autistic son is now attending main stream school here in Ontario.

It's been a steep learning curve for us that I still feel that we are on but the school has been wonderful with our little boy and he loves going there. So far a positive experience although I still fear the long term future for him I'm afraid.
stepnek is offline  
Closed Thread

Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Canada

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

All times are GMT. The time now is 4:13 am.


Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1999-2010 BritishExpats.com