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Old Nov 8th 2017, 9:59 pm   #1
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Default Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Heya

So I know there have been loads of these threads asking questions about nursing but there was a few questions that I couldn't find the answers for and was wondering if anyone knew.

Basically I'm in the starting phases of thinking of moving to Vancouver. I know the real start is to apply to NNAS. However I'm an adult nurse currently working on an elderly ward, there's a neonatal job come up nearby and I'm wondering if this would be a good idea to go for as it includes training. Would this help with my application or is it the theoretical side I would need so there would be no point? I'm obviously thinking about the bridging course that I may or may not need.

Also I'm confused as to which to start first, the nursing side of things or the visa side of things? Both seem long winded but in my head I'm like surely I should find out if I need to go to uni again first and then could lnow to go for a student visa?

Sorry for the long post! Thanks for any help in advance

Ellie
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Old Nov 9th 2017, 9:45 am   #2
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Default Re: Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Usually both clinical and theory hours are required but if you have to do the assessment days then skills and experience is taken into account. There was talk on BC doing something different for IENS but not sure if that has actually started although NNAS is still required
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Old Nov 9th 2017, 11:47 am   #3
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Default Re: Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Hiya
I'm not sure if a job on a neonatal ward will necessarily help your application, but if it is something that you are interested in doing anyway then it certainly won't do you any harm. NNAS is really only interested in your initial nursing degree, they don't assess any post-qualification education. However if you got a good NNAS result such as comparable or somewhat comparable then CRNBC might look at your experience and post-qualification education in making their registration decision. I've read on forums that there are cases of IENs being eligible to write NCLEX without extra education, but I don't think that it is the norm. Plus I suspect they are fairly experienced nurses with excellent patient assessment and diagnostic skills, more along the lines of what an Advanced Nurse Practitioner role would be in the UK.

I don't know what to recommend as far as visas go, as it isn't applicable to me. However, if you look at NNAS and NCAS, you will see that you have the option to apply to multiple regulatory bodies. So you could apply to CRNBC (for registered nurses) and CLPNBC (for Licenced Practical Nurses) at the same time. The idea I believe behind this is that it is faster to gain registration as a LPN, which would mean you could potentially be living in Canada and working in the healthcare system quicker than going straight to CRNBC.

If you did go down the route of gaining registration as a LPN and still wanted to pursue registration as a RN, Thompson Rivers University offers the 1 year bridging program to LPNs and Care Aides who are working in Canada via distance learning online. So you could essentially be able to work as a LPN and study to be a RN in BC at the same time.

However, the other option for the 1 year program is Kwantlen, which is a full time program. It is apparently a very intense program and students find it difficult or impossible to hold even a part-time job while completing it. So I think that if you were to consider going to Canada on a student visa, you would have to be prepared to pay international student fees ($$$!!!) as well as be able to support yourself for a year in the lower mainland ($$$!!!!). If you are a permanent resident in Canada though, the program is eligible for student loans.

I hope that makes sense. Good luck! :-)
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Old Nov 9th 2017, 3:09 pm   #4
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Default Re: Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Visa wise, and assuming you are a UK resident looking to move to Canada permanently, don't have a Canadian spouse or common law partner then you will most likely be going through the FSW stream using EE. Federal skilled workers (FSW)

To check eligible do the following:

1) Check you score here: You will need 67 points or higher to qualify Selection factors: federal skilled workers

2) Assuming you have the 67 points required you will be eligible to enter the pool with other applicants. Applicants are chosen from this pool based on the CRS scores with draws made between once and twice a month.

You can calculate your score here:
Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) tool: skilled immigrants (Express Entry)

Note the tool is a little clunky as it is really designed for people to check their scores once they receive their ITA but you can assume full marks for English (achievable with a little study before the test). Recent draws have been in the 430 to 450 range but they vary.
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Old Nov 9th 2017, 4:23 pm   #5
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Default Re: Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer_abroad View Post
Visa wise, and assuming you are a UK resident looking to move to Canada permanently, don't have a Canadian spouse or common law partner then you will most likely be going through the FSW stream using EE. Federal skilled workers (FSW)

To check eligible do the following:

1) Check you score here: You will need 67 points or higher to qualify Selection factors: federal skilled workers

2) Assuming you have the 67 points required you will be eligible to enter the pool with other applicants. Applicants are chosen from this pool based on the CRS scores with draws made between once and twice a month.

You can calculate your score here:
Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) tool: skilled immigrants (Express Entry)

Note the tool is a little clunky as it is really designed for people to check their scores once they receive their ITA but you can assume full marks for English (achievable with a little study before the test). Recent draws have been in the 430 to 450 range but they vary.
... or if the OP manages to get a job offer, then the BC PNP Skills stream (Health Professionals) or BC EE (PNP) Skilled Worker stream (Health Professional) may be other options.

https://www.welcomebc.ca/Immigrate-t...e-Professional
https://www.welcomebc.ca/Immigrate-t...Skilled-Worker

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Last edited by Siouxie; Nov 9th 2017 at 4:26 pm.
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Old Nov 10th 2017, 12:34 pm   #6
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Default Re: Nurse wanting advice on move to BC

Thanks everyone for replying. I think I may look into the LPN route as someone has mentioned it before and the bridging courses can be super expensive from what I've been looking at!

I just need to save a bit more money and then I'll start applying. The visa initial test I score 70+ but the next one I was low 400s so will have to try and find ways to boost that

Thanks again!
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