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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 1:04 am   #121
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Originally Posted by GarryP View Post
Ignoring the other junk, this one particular inaccuracy has to be pointed out. The reason the car manufacturers in Australia weren't competitive was because the car manufacturers wouldn't/didn't invest in better machinery and automation. Basically they ran them into the ground, happily taking government handouts, and running them as cash cows till the government pulled the plug and they closed them down.

They could have produced the models that were wanted, innovated new models, automated manufacture - it would have been quite possible to do it right.

It was a failure of management and a failure of governance - in the companies, and in government.

What it wasn't was unions.

https://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/...n-saved--65418
Really ...... OK .... if you insist.


Labour rigidity ruins economy
MAURICE NEWMANThe Australian12:00AM September 28, 2015

How many more workers must lose their jobs before it is accepted that work practices and labour costs influence investors and management on where to domicile their businesses and whether to invest? Or even, when to cut and run? How long before workers understand that in the end, governments, unions and taxpayers can’t save them?

Our car industry will be gone by 2017. We’re watching our steel industry disappear. Oil-refining capacity has shrunk 42 per cent in three years. Two of our six primary aluminium smelters have shut. Heinz and McCains have moved their food processing to New Zealand. Since 2000, 14 wool processing plants have closed, leaving just three.

Unions deny these closures are related to high business-input costs, saying they are the fault of the government, an overvalued currency, poor management and inferior products.

The bosses beg to differ. Bob Every, former president of BHP Steel, says: “It’s a sad situation where I see both of our steel companies really struggling and it goes to the challenge we have in Australia to be internationally competitive. We’ve come out the other side of a resources cycle where we’ve got high wages, high energy costs and industrial relations that have unfortunately gone back 15 years.”

Ford president Bob Graziano referred to improving scale and competitiveness but lamented “our costs are double that of Europe and nearly four times Ford in Asia”. Toyota’s Australian president, Max Yasuda, indicated Australia’s workplace culture was the last straw. Holden also cited high energy costs.

Who do you believe?

Of course the high Australian dollar was a factor. But, even after a 35 per cent devaluation over four years, Australia’s minimum wage is 40 per cent above Canada’s, for six hours a week less work. It is also true that Australia’s high energy costs are a challenge. Today, wholesale electricity prices are the world’s sixth highest. Four states and territories rank among the six most expensive household jurisdictions anywhere.

For gas, Australia has the highest domestic prices of any exporting country. But ACTU president Ged Kearney and secretary Jeff Lawrence publicly endorsed the Gillard carbon tax and the CFMEU now supports Labor’s proposed 50 per cent renewable energy target, subject to “unprecedented assistance” being given to retrenched workers.

Go figure.

Corporate taxes are similarly dismissed as a factor in job losses. Australia’s corporate rate at 30 per cent is nearly 25 per cent above the OECD average. BHP Billiton claims it pays an effective 45 per cent rate. But slugging companies plays to the politics of envy, so union leaders can see no evidence that company taxes are too high.

Australia’s labour movement has negotiated a place in the law which confers the most extraordinary power and privilege. Despite having significant commercial interests, it enjoys legislated freedom from income and capital gains taxes. It and its officers enjoy damages relief for tort not accorded to ordinary citizens. It is exempt from large provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act. It is overseen by a judicial system where the umpires are drawn from a sympathetic gene pool.

To achieve this it has captured both the Labor Party and the Greens, on whose behalf it shamelessly campaigns and supports with generous financial and in-kind donations. In the election of Victorian Labor Premier Daniel Andrews, essential service union members doorknocked 93,000 homes and made 130,000 phone calls. Their reward? More jobs and pay rises.

Trade union activism is becoming more reckless, harmful and ruthless. It wages dishonest campaigns like the ones against the China free-trade agreement and state government proposals to lease poles and wires. Truth in advertising does not apply to unions.

The ALP has been a willing accomplice in all of this and even helped defeat a bill to bring law and order back to building sites. Too many union leaders have become self-serving power seekers.

The operation of this cartel would be tolerated nowhere else. It’s time Australians woke up to the enormous damage this is doing to the economy and to their job prospects.

The Abbott government’s initiative to establish a royal commission into union governance and corruption met with extraordinary hostility from the unions and Labor. It is one reason why opposition to the former prime minister was so personal and vicious. He represented the biggest threat to harmful union practices.

Apologists for Australia’s industrial relations arrangements will continue to argue they are benign and are in the interests of jobs and equity. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has ruled out changes to workers’ conditions. Yet empirical evidence cries out for change. It’s no coincidence that South Australia is the jobless state. It is the home of unionised industries, the highest energy costs and big government, encouraged by generous handouts from Canberra.

Critically, many of the Abbott government’s initiatives were directed at lifting productivity and improving innovation. But as important as these are, they alone will not counter the dead weight of Australia’s bygone labour laws.

It is no longer sufficient to expose the exploitation and abuses of Australia’s job-destroying workplace cartel and the myths which perpetuate it. It is time to bust them.

Last edited by Beoz; Jan 3rd 2018 at 1:06 am.
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 1:25 am   #122
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Originally Posted by Beoz View Post
Labour rigidity ruins economy
MAURICE NEWMAN
The Australian12:00AM September 28, 2015
Ding ding ... oops bang goes that opinion piece's credibility

Quote:
CFMEU
It's a pretty good indicator that the article is going to be poor when that shibboleth appears.
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 1:43 am   #123
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Originally Posted by GarryP View Post
Ding ding ... oops bang goes that opinion piece's credibility

It's a pretty good indicator that the article is going to be poor when that shibboleth appears.
Isn't it funny, Andrew McClean got so close to hitting the nail on the head, but just couldn't quite get there.

This has been a long time coming though. As soon as the government turned its attention to protecting consumers – opening up the market to greater competition by, firstly, reducing tariffs for imported vehicles in the 1990s and then cutting all financial support - rather than protecting a workforce, the collapse of the car industry was swift, and somewhat, inevitable.

Real protection could have been arranged if those bloody minded unions saw the benefit of protecting a business rather than stifling it.

In the end they kill off their own members.

Ding ding, down for the count.
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Old Jan 3rd 2018, 11:07 am   #124
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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I don't need to look on line, as I completely agree. Between my partner and self, we have experienced in different areas, the worst of management possible to imagine. A regular change in some instances of CEO. Only the replacement was as bad or worse as predecessor. This often amounted to the desire to bring in a 'new broom' meaning put their own people in position. The mobbing, bullying,(the latter more subtle in more recent times and nothing that can be traced ) boards stacked with people having own agendas and not necessary with the organisation/company in mind.
One board meeting they had to be separated from inflicting physical violence on one another.


So much could be said about it. Mostly negative. Very different to Europe where more maturity ruled. All a question of the wrong people given a position that they are not equipped to do. They appear to love to wield the big stick but increasingly subtle thanks to the law and unions.
You and Garry...what absolute poppycock...

You both rather sound like you have sizeable chips..

I've heard it all on this site over the years..what I do know is that the more marginalised the expat, the unhappier they are..and they see the worst in everything...
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 4:59 am   #125
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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You and Garry...what absolute poppycock...

You both rather sound like you have sizeable chips..

I've heard it all on this site over the years..what I do know is that the more marginalised the expat, the unhappier they are..and they see the worst in everything...

Who are you to decide long experience of another in work relations absolute poppycock?


No marginalised ex pat here ....right in the thick of things. Say it how it is simple as that. Without unions many would be up the creek. They help keep the buzzards honest.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 5:15 am   #126
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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You and Garry...what absolute poppycock...

You both rather sound like you have sizeable chips..

I've heard it all on this site over the years..what I do know is that the more marginalised the expat, the unhappier they are..and they see the worst in everything...
Badge with some words of wisdom

Spot f**king on
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 5:15 am   #127
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Who are you to decide long experience of another in work relations absolute poppycock?


No marginalised ex pat here ....right in the thick of things. Say it how it is simple as that. Without unions many would be up the creek. They help keep the buzzards honest.
The proof of that is in the casual/contract workforce. Anyone in cleaning, delivery, local dining, small local retail, will almost certainly be exploited.


The casualised workforce is also one reason why union membership numbers are dropping.


The workforce labour costs in delivery have dropped so much, that Amazon cannot trust contractors to deliver the items for them. Such is the standard at the bottom of the pile. Hence they were forced to turn to heavily unionised Apost. So in some ways the exploiters have done the unionists a favour.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 5:33 am   #128
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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The proof of that is in the casual/contract workforce. Anyone in cleaning, delivery, local dining, small local retail, will almost certainly be exploited.


The casualised workforce is also one reason why union membership numbers are dropping.


The workforce labour costs in delivery have dropped so much, that Amazon cannot trust contractors to deliver the items for them. Such is the standard at the bottom of the pile. Hence they were forced to turn to heavily unionised Apost. So in some ways the exploiters have done the unionists a favour.
My point was not about work relations but yet more defeatism from Mr T who has always struck ne as a thoughtful and cultured bloke, which I like; but somewhat watching the world pass over him..like many a peeved expat..
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 5:50 am   #129
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Badge with some words of wisdom

Spot f**king on
Just the sort of endorsement Badge probably would prefer to do without.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 5:54 am   #130
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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The proof of that is in the casual/contract workforce. Anyone in cleaning, delivery, local dining, small local retail, will almost certainly be exploited.


The casualised workforce is also one reason why union membership numbers are dropping.


The workforce labour costs in delivery have dropped so much, that Amazon cannot trust contractors to deliver the items for them. Such is the standard at the bottom of the pile. Hence they were forced to turn to heavily unionised Apost. So in some ways the exploiters have done the unionists a favour.
Exactly. With 1.8 million temporary visa holders in Australia, hard to se how it could be anything but.
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 6:00 am   #131
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My point was not about work relations but yet more defeatism from Mr T who has always struck ne as a thoughtful and cultured bloke, which I like; but somewhat watching the world pass over him..like many a peeved expat..
How about the decline in conditions, witnessed by us Aussies, over time playing a large part in just how miffed off we are? So those that don't take it laying down and do speak out are somehow watching the world pass over them? What strange psychology. I'd have thought contrary. Those that don't give a fig, claim all will be okay, even when evidence to the contrary that all is far from okay, would be the ones to warrant such scorn?


Still don't get the peeved ex pat bit?
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Old Jan 4th 2018, 8:40 am   #132
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How about the decline in conditions, witnessed by us Aussies, over time playing a large part in just how miffed off we are? So those that don't take it laying down and do speak out are somehow watching the world pass over them? What strange psychology. I'd have thought contrary. Those that don't give a fig, claim all will be okay, even when evidence to the contrary that all is far from okay, would be the ones to warrant such scorn?


Still don't get the peeved ex pat bit?
Do you rate yourself as a battler or in a battler industry ? I had the impression you were reporting to or near board level? Aussie workers get paid well and there are hundreds of thousands running their own businesses and doing well as are many white collar workers...I grant we could redistribute more equitably. They talked about fat cats years ago now identity politics talks about neo-liberalism...etc..

Peeved expat because you've been somewhat down in the dumps (about Perth) for years..

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Old Jan 4th 2018, 9:37 am   #133
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Default Re: TRADE UNIONS..hmmm

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Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
How about the decline in conditions, witnessed by us Aussies, over time playing a large part in just how miffed off we are? So those that don't take it laying down and do speak out are somehow watching the world pass over them? What strange psychology. I'd have thought contrary. Those that don't give a fig, claim all will be okay, even when evidence to the contrary that all is far from okay, would be the ones to warrant such scorn?


Still don't get the peeved ex pat bit?
As Badge said "the world has passed you over". As I said, old timer, time to move onwards and upwards. The unions are failing you.
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