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Old Dec 6th 2017, 8:09 am   #1
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Default Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Hi,

Me and my other half are planning on moving to Australia next year. First on a working holiday visa with the hope long term to stay permanently. However, the only thing worrying us is that he has Type 1 Diabetes, Insulin dependent. I have read forums and spoke to various visa professionals who say that most of the time your fine to get a visa with diabetes. However I just wondered if there was anyone who has been through this experience before and can give us any advice mostly for peace of mine while we await the appointment for medicals.

Many Thanks!
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Old Dec 12th 2017, 6:47 am   #2
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Default Re: Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Hello,

I have a child with type 1 diabetes so know costs etc.

What country are you from? As Diabetes products are expensive without a medicare card. If you are from the UK and some other countries you may be able to access medicare card/help. You will also need to register with NDSS.

The main problem if you have to pay for items on the holiday visa is the cost.
Here are some examples:
Accu-Chek Performa testing strips cost $50 a box without medicare help. With a medicare card they are only $5.
Insulin - Novorapid vial costs $147 or only $5 on Medicare.

Sorry I do not have any experience with the holiday visas.

You should also register with NDSS this gives you further discount and you get a registration card. Google NDSS for info.

Basically without Medicare you would spend hundreds per month on your insulin, strips, needles.

If you are on a pump, you need Medicare for these consumables. They can then be purchased via your state diabetes association website or pharmacy. Again you would be unlikely to afford pump consumables without medicare. You will also need a doctor here to sign your forms.
Accu-Chek infusion sets $218 a box or $16 with medicare card/NDSS.
Accu- Chek cartridges/Resevoirs cost $157 a box or $27 with medicare card/NDSS.

Unfortunately their is no free prescriptions in Australia, so if you are from the UK you will have to pay for your consumables even if you have a permanent visa or citizenship.

As for getting a visa it is possible with medical conditions. However we are not immigration and only they can say yes or no.

This is what we did for two of our kids, you will need a letter from your doctor/hospital. This should say your what your medical condition is, what medication you are on etc. It should also state that your diabetes is stable and well managed. It should also state your are able to work and lead a normal life. Give this letter to the doctor during the medical, it can be attached to your file to support the visa. We did this for our kids medical and it worked. It is also possible to hire a visa specialist to help you. However we did it all ourselves.

Good luck with your plans. Sorry someone else may have more info regarding holiday visas.

Last edited by midwestmaiden; Dec 12th 2017 at 6:51 am.
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Old Dec 12th 2017, 11:33 pm   #3
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Default Re: Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Hi,
My wife has type 1 diabetes. Although I had PR, she initially came with me on a holiday visa and applied for her PR, with me as her sponsor, within the 3 months time period of the holiday visa. She then had to wait a year on a bridging visa until her PR was approved. There were no issue with her diabetes because it was well controlled. She didn't have to do a medical other than the standard one that ever immigrant does. Sorry off the top of my head I cannot remember if she had to supply evidence from her endocrinologist.

Our medical bills, in part due to the complications she has from diabetes after having it for 30 years, are pretty steep. Beware of the gap! That is the difference between what Medicare or your Private health insurance refund you and what the actual amount paid to the medical professional is. That can be hundreds of dollars are well. If you join the NDSS make sure the pharmacists that supplies your diabetic stuff actually applies the NDSS discount!

My wife has an insulin pump that she got from the NHS but we have been on the top rate of cover of our Private Health Insurance ($450 per month) for the last 4 years so that she could get a replacement insulin pump, which she has finally got.

I am not sure which country you are from but if it is the UK or another European country with free-at-the-point-of-use healthcare you'll find Australia backwards when it comes to diabetic care. If you come from the US where, from my understanding, the cost of diabetes care and management is including in your private health insurance which is provided by your employer, you will also find it expensive.

Overall being a Type 1 diabetic in Australia can be expensive but it shouldn't stop you getting your Permanent Residency, although check the latest changes to the Visa situation as well before making any final decisions.

Best of luck
RDU
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 12:23 am   #4
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Default Re: Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Regarding getting a pump with Australian health insurance you do not need the top cover or to spend $450 a month. We are with HBF and only have a very basic individual cover, its mainly covers extras. We still get the pump using this as it covers Prostheses. So if money is tight do not get the top cover.

Also you only need to have your insurance for 12 months before you can claim your first pump. Then it is every four years as that is when the warranty of the pump runs out. Most companies can loan you a pump until your insurance reaches the 12 months waiting period. We had a loan pump for a few months.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:27 am   #5
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Default Re: Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Have you checked if you are eligible for a visa beyond a whv. If you are eligible now, I always recommend you get it now as things change regularly and you may not be in a years time
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Old Yesterday, 12:00 am   #6
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Default Re: Type 1 Diabetes in Australia

Thanks Midwesternmaiden, I'll look into that.
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