Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Australia

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old Apr 28th 2017, 1:50 pm   #76
Kooky. Female
Used to be Seasider
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 6,743
Kooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond reputeKooky. has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Well yes but you don't get many Warhol exhibitions in Marrickville.
Kooky. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 28th 2017, 1:53 pm   #77
Beoz 
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 10,694
Beoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kooky. View Post
Well yes but you don't get many Warhol exhibitions in Marrickville.
Yes but you can watch the under carriage of A380's landing. And I love plane spotting.
Beoz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29th 2017, 2:06 pm   #78
Just Joined
 
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 1
Viaggio solitario is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

1. What was your profession and seniority when you arrived in Australia?
2. Where did you come from and which city did you settle in Australia?
3. How long did it take for you to secure a job in your field and was your first/2nd/3rd job and salary in line your skill level?
4. If the job in your early days wasn't ideal, did you eventually find a job that commensurate with your level and experience? If yes, how long did it take?
5. And lastly, was it worth it for yourself/family, after all the sweat/tears? Did Australia live up to your dreams, and is it indeed the better life you had hoped for yourself and family?

I suppose I am trying to gain courage from all those who have gone before me. When I read that highly experience professionals finally landing a job...as a clerk, flipping pizzas.....even construction site, my heart grew faint. If those are just temporary measures, that might be doable, but I wonder if some migrants ever get a chance to build their career again


1) it's irrelevant to moving to aus.

2) lived in a few cities around the world... moved to the sunshine coast

3) had a job in hours of arriving. was receiving calls at all hours of the night before I even left home with job offers... I arrived in 2005. If you didn't have work then it was because you didn't want to work.

4) what became very apparent living here was that bosses are not like what I have experience prior. I lived in the UK, USA and Canada before Aus. What I often felt here was there was an undercurrent of animosity that management had towards the staff where ever I worked. In the early years it was hard to put a finger on it, but it was certainly there. I think it has a lot to do with aussies being so cheap. Wages here are relatively high (so is the cost of living) here and I think it comes down to bosses feeling the need to punish their staff as a result. Kinda like christians are cheap and wont leave a tip in restaurants because they resent having to tithe... I had a few jobs in me industry, trying to find a decent boss... One day I came home and said to my wife I would rather top myself if I have to continue in this work in this country... 10 years, two degrees and a grad dip later, I am still trying to find my feet. What I discovered is if you are a non-aussie you will be discriminated against. I have personally heard bosses say to staff that were born here but their parent weren't say they weren't aussies... If you are over 35 you are considered too old. I know, because I have been told 4 times in my job search that I am too old, twice in writing... This is by far the hardest country I have found to gain a footing and to get on with life.

5)I'll start with the stats. Not a hard and fast opinion but it is based on 12 years of delving into why it works for some and not for most... If you are normal and from a western nation you most likely will leave within 5 years... If you are from the UK my estimate is that 60-70% will leave, if you are from North America at least 90% will leave, and from the rest of Europe I'd say at least 95% will leave... Most people sticking it out here are from developing or 3rd world nations, after all what do they have to return to... Where as those from a fully developed nation say it's better back home. Overall the odds are you will not like aus and will eventually leave.

This is where it gets complicated. If you and your spouse are like chalk and cheese you will find serious problems arising after a couple years which will test your marriage to the limit. I've seen quite a few marriages fail because one is loving it and the other is developing a serous dislike for it. The one loving it doesn't want to discuss the others struggles and it ends up the other picks up and leaves. My observations are: it seems children and women adapt better than men. I think aussie women and children are less xenophobic than aussie men.

If you are like two peas in a pod you will both either love it or hate it. Which means you will either stay and say life is grand or you will together hate it and leave sooner rather than later.

From all I have seen in the past 12 years I would not in good conscious ever endorse anyone from a western nation move to Australia. On average it just doesn't work out. If you want an adventure that only last a couple years then yes go for your life, but get out before it impacts on your relationship. In other words don't give up your life else where - have an exit strategy in place.

For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...

Last edited by Viaggio solitario; Apr 29th 2017 at 2:11 pm.
Viaggio solitario is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29th 2017, 3:50 pm   #79
Card Carrying Deplorable
 
Amazulu's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2003
Location: Alloha snack bar
Posts: 22,864
Amazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond reputeAmazulu has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viaggio solitario View Post
1. What was your profession and seniority when you arrived in Australia?
2. Where did you come from and which city did you settle in Australia?
3. How long did it take for you to secure a job in your field and was your first/2nd/3rd job and salary in line your skill level?
4. If the job in your early days wasn't ideal, did you eventually find a job that commensurate with your level and experience? If yes, how long did it take?
5. And lastly, was it worth it for yourself/family, after all the sweat/tears? Did Australia live up to your dreams, and is it indeed the better life you had hoped for yourself and family?

I suppose I am trying to gain courage from all those who have gone before me. When I read that highly experience professionals finally landing a job...as a clerk, flipping pizzas.....even construction site, my heart grew faint. If those are just temporary measures, that might be doable, but I wonder if some migrants ever get a chance to build their career again


1) it's irrelevant to moving to aus.

2) lived in a few cities around the world... moved to the sunshine coast

3) had a job in hours of arriving. was receiving calls at all hours of the night before I even left home with job offers... I arrived in 2005. If you didn't have work then it was because you didn't want to work.

4) what became very apparent living here was that bosses are not like what I have experience prior. I lived in the UK, USA and Canada before Aus. What I often felt here was there was an undercurrent of animosity that management had towards the staff where ever I worked. In the early years it was hard to put a finger on it, but it was certainly there. I think it has a lot to do with aussies being so cheap. Wages here are relatively high (so is the cost of living) here and I think it comes down to bosses feeling the need to punish their staff as a result. Kinda like christians are cheap and wont leave a tip in restaurants because they resent having to tithe... I had a few jobs in me industry, trying to find a decent boss... One day I came home and said to my wife I would rather top myself if I have to continue in this work in this country... 10 years, two degrees and a grad dip later, I am still trying to find my feet. What I discovered is if you are a non-aussie you will be discriminated against. I have personally heard bosses say to staff that were born here but their parent weren't say they weren't aussies... If you are over 35 you are considered too old. I know, because I have been told 4 times in my job search that I am too old, twice in writing... This is by far the hardest country I have found to gain a footing and to get on with life.

5)I'll start with the stats. Not a hard and fast opinion but it is based on 12 years of delving into why it works for some and not for most... If you are normal and from a western nation you most likely will leave within 5 years... If you are from the UK my estimate is that 60-70% will leave, if you are from North America at least 90% will leave, and from the rest of Europe I'd say at least 95% will leave... Most people sticking it out here are from developing or 3rd world nations, after all what do they have to return to... Where as those from a fully developed nation say it's better back home. Overall the odds are you will not like aus and will eventually leave.

This is where it gets complicated. If you and your spouse are like chalk and cheese you will find serious problems arising after a couple years which will test your marriage to the limit. I've seen quite a few marriages fail because one is loving it and the other is developing a serous dislike for it. The one loving it doesn't want to discuss the others struggles and it ends up the other picks up and leaves. My observations are: it seems children and women adapt better than men. I think aussie women and children are less xenophobic than aussie men.

If you are like two peas in a pod you will both either love it or hate it. Which means you will either stay and say life is grand or you will together hate it and leave sooner rather than later.

From all I have seen in the past 12 years I would not in good conscious ever endorse anyone from a western nation move to Australia. On average it just doesn't work out. If you want an adventure that only last a couple years then yes go for your life, but get out before it impacts on your relationship. In other words don't give up your life else where - have an exit strategy in place.

For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...
Disagree

The most I've ever earned has been here - and when my earning was at its peak, it was the cruisiest job I've ever had. Yes there was pressure at times but everyone was under pressure from the very top to the very bottom - nature of the beast

I'm Australian now but I was never discriminated against for being non-Australian. Every project I've worked on has been like the UN general assembly because there were so many nationalities represented

As for age being an issue, I've never seen or experienced it. A few years ago I was working with a German guy who was 72. I had a guy in the team I was leading who was 67. There is no age discrimination in engineering

I would thoroughly recommend Australia as a place to live and work

If your marriage is not solid then it will not work wherever you are. Blaming a country is a red herring

<snip>
In conclusion - your experience has been totally different to mine and if it's not working out for you then move somewhere where it will. The world is your oyster

Good luck!
__________________
Australia/UK - Same sh*t, different bucket
The Wallaby, still the bitch of the Springbok.

Last edited by moneypenny20; Apr 30th 2017 at 3:42 am. Reason: That's not helpful.
Amazulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29th 2017, 6:16 pm   #80
quoll Female
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
quoll's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 7,942
quoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond reputequoll has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viaggio solitario View Post
1. What was your profession and seniority when you arrived in Australia?
2. Where did you come from and which city did you settle in Australia?
3. How long did it take for you to secure a job in your field and was your first/2nd/3rd job and salary in line your skill level?
4. If the job in your early days wasn't ideal, did you eventually find a job that commensurate with your level and experience? If yes, how long did it take?
5. And lastly, was it worth it for yourself/family, after all the sweat/tears? Did Australia live up to your dreams, and is it indeed the better life you had hoped for yourself and family?

I suppose I am trying to gain courage from all those who have gone before me. When I read that highly experience professionals finally landing a job...as a clerk, flipping pizzas.....even construction site, my heart grew faint. If those are just temporary measures, that might be doable, but I wonder if some migrants ever get a chance to build their career again


1) it's irrelevant to moving to aus.

2) lived in a few cities around the world... moved to the sunshine coast

3) had a job in hours of arriving. was receiving calls at all hours of the night before I even left home with job offers... I arrived in 2005. If you didn't have work then it was because you didn't want to work.

4) what became very apparent living here was that bosses are not like what I have experience prior. I lived in the UK, USA and Canada before Aus. What I often felt here was there was an undercurrent of animosity that management had towards the staff where ever I worked. In the early years it was hard to put a finger on it, but it was certainly there. I think it has a lot to do with aussies being so cheap. Wages here are relatively high (so is the cost of living) here and I think it comes down to bosses feeling the need to punish their staff as a result. Kinda like christians are cheap and wont leave a tip in restaurants because they resent having to tithe... I had a few jobs in me industry, trying to find a decent boss... One day I came home and said to my wife I would rather top myself if I have to continue in this work in this country... 10 years, two degrees and a grad dip later, I am still trying to find my feet. What I discovered is if you are a non-aussie you will be discriminated against. I have personally heard bosses say to staff that were born here but their parent weren't say they weren't aussies... If you are over 35 you are considered too old. I know, because I have been told 4 times in my job search that I am too old, twice in writing... This is by far the hardest country I have found to gain a footing and to get on with life.

5)I'll start with the stats. Not a hard and fast opinion but it is based on 12 years of delving into why it works for some and not for most... If you are normal and from a western nation you most likely will leave within 5 years... If you are from the UK my estimate is that 60-70% will leave, if you are from North America at least 90% will leave, and from the rest of Europe I'd say at least 95% will leave... Most people sticking it out here are from developing or 3rd world nations, after all what do they have to return to... Where as those from a fully developed nation say it's better back home. Overall the odds are you will not like aus and will eventually leave.

This is where it gets complicated. If you and your spouse are like chalk and cheese you will find serious problems arising after a couple years which will test your marriage to the limit. I've seen quite a few marriages fail because one is loving it and the other is developing a serous dislike for it. The one loving it doesn't want to discuss the others struggles and it ends up the other picks up and leaves. My observations are: it seems children and women adapt better than men. I think aussie women and children are less xenophobic than aussie men.

If you are like two peas in a pod you will both either love it or hate it. Which means you will either stay and say life is grand or you will together hate it and leave sooner rather than later.

From all I have seen in the past 12 years I would not in good conscious ever endorse anyone from a western nation move to Australia. On average it just doesn't work out. If you want an adventure that only last a couple years then yes go for your life, but get out before it impacts on your relationship. In other words don't give up your life else where - have an exit strategy in place.

For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...
I can relate and I sympathize. Geography changed everything for me but I was financially ok at the time. Please call Lifeline or one of the other help lines before doing something drastic 13 11 14
quoll is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29th 2017, 6:21 pm   #81
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Location: Canada/UK
Posts: 261
geoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond reputegeoff52 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viaggio solitario View Post
[I].

For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...
If you feel like this often, then there are people in the health care profession who can help you.
Even the Royal family are publicly discussing mental health in public. No one should try and deal with these issues alone, there is help available.
geoff52 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 30th 2017, 1:45 am   #82
Beoz 
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 10,694
Beoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond reputeBeoz has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viaggio solitario View Post
1. What was your profession and seniority when you arrived in Australia?
2. Where did you come from and which city did you settle in Australia?
3. How long did it take for you to secure a job in your field and was your first/2nd/3rd job and salary in line your skill level?
4. If the job in your early days wasn't ideal, did you eventually find a job that commensurate with your level and experience? If yes, how long did it take?
5. And lastly, was it worth it for yourself/family, after all the sweat/tears? Did Australia live up to your dreams, and is it indeed the better life you had hoped for yourself and family?

I suppose I am trying to gain courage from all those who have gone before me. When I read that highly experience professionals finally landing a job...as a clerk, flipping pizzas.....even construction site, my heart grew faint. If those are just temporary measures, that might be doable, but I wonder if some migrants ever get a chance to build their career again


1) it's irrelevant to moving to aus.

2) lived in a few cities around the world... moved to the sunshine coast

3) had a job in hours of arriving. was receiving calls at all hours of the night before I even left home with job offers... I arrived in 2005. If you didn't have work then it was because you didn't want to work.

4) what became very apparent living here was that bosses are not like what I have experience prior. I lived in the UK, USA and Canada before Aus. What I often felt here was there was an undercurrent of animosity that management had towards the staff where ever I worked. In the early years it was hard to put a finger on it, but it was certainly there. I think it has a lot to do with aussies being so cheap. Wages here are relatively high (so is the cost of living) here and I think it comes down to bosses feeling the need to punish their staff as a result. Kinda like christians are cheap and wont leave a tip in restaurants because they resent having to tithe... I had a few jobs in me industry, trying to find a decent boss... One day I came home and said to my wife I would rather top myself if I have to continue in this work in this country... 10 years, two degrees and a grad dip later, I am still trying to find my feet. What I discovered is if you are a non-aussie you will be discriminated against. I have personally heard bosses say to staff that were born here but their parent weren't say they weren't aussies... If you are over 35 you are considered too old. I know, because I have been told 4 times in my job search that I am too old, twice in writing... This is by far the hardest country I have found to gain a footing and to get on with life.

5)I'll start with the stats. Not a hard and fast opinion but it is based on 12 years of delving into why it works for some and not for most... If you are normal and from a western nation you most likely will leave within 5 years... If you are from the UK my estimate is that 60-70% will leave, if you are from North America at least 90% will leave, and from the rest of Europe I'd say at least 95% will leave... Most people sticking it out here are from developing or 3rd world nations, after all what do they have to return to... Where as those from a fully developed nation say it's better back home. Overall the odds are you will not like aus and will eventually leave.

This is where it gets complicated. If you and your spouse are like chalk and cheese you will find serious problems arising after a couple years which will test your marriage to the limit. I've seen quite a few marriages fail because one is loving it and the other is developing a serous dislike for it. The one loving it doesn't want to discuss the others struggles and it ends up the other picks up and leaves. My observations are: it seems children and women adapt better than men. I think aussie women and children are less xenophobic than aussie men.

If you are like two peas in a pod you will both either love it or hate it. Which means you will either stay and say life is grand or you will together hate it and leave sooner rather than later.

From all I have seen in the past 12 years I would not in good conscious ever endorse anyone from a western nation move to Australia. On average it just doesn't work out. If you want an adventure that only last a couple years then yes go for your life, but get out before it impacts on your relationship. In other words don't give up your life else where - have an exit strategy in place.

For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...
In the company I work for in Australia the local boss has never been an Aussie in my time there. Saffa's and English. Also they were guys that were not imported. They were guys who emigrated 10 years ago or so and worked their way up.

I have to disagree. Plenty of foreigners do well in jobs in Australia.

Perhaps its you or the job. Have you considered moving jobs?
Beoz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 30th 2017, 10:23 am   #83
Concierge
 
spouse of scouse's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: Wirral UK
Posts: 6,818
spouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Always sad to see stories where things haven't gone according to plan, and people's individual experiences understandably colour their entire perception.

Re your comment
For me personally... Today I hit a brick wall - hard. I only came across this post because I have hit my limit and I need to find answers. The dilemma is, who do you seek out to get advise from. How do you frame: I don't like you or your country but can you help me... At this point the way I see it is I have three options: I try to stick it out, get medicated to the point that I am a functioning comatose patient. I leave, but there's no guarantee that geography will fix my deep depression and financially it will be devastating. Or I simply end it. I even checked my super insurance and apparently if I top myself they would still have to pay out... So there was one positive to the day...

You do have another choice, which is quite different to any of those you've listed. Get your GP to refer you to a good psychologist, who can help you to talk things through and sort out the muddle. Far from getting all parochial on you (if they're even Australian, which isn't a given!), he/she will encourage and help you to identify the source of your depression and work with you to find solutions.

Psychologists in Australia don't prescribe medication. If your GP (or psychiatrist, if referred) thinks you would benefit from medication to help you over the hurdle, this certainly wouldn't be something that would leave you comatose. All a mild anti-depressant would do is reduce feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, giving you a well deserved break from feeling so rotten and giving you the mental energy to tackle your situation from a more positive position.

There's actually a plus to hitting rock bottom - the only way is up. Take that first positive step towards getting some help, you have nothing to lose and absolutely everything to gain.
__________________
An Aussie wool
spouse of scouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23rd 2017, 7:50 pm   #84
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 29
anatolie is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viaggio solitario View Post
[I]*

5)I'll start with the stats. Not a hard and fast opinion but it is based on 12 years of delving into why it works for some and not for most... If you are normal and from a western nation you most likely will leave within 5 years... If you are from the UK my estimate is that 60-70% will leave, if you are from North America at least 90% will leave, and from the rest of Europe I'd say at least 95% will leave... Most people sticking it out here are from developing or 3rd world nations, after all what do they have to return to... Where as those from a fully developed nation say it's better back home. Overall the odds are you will not like aus and will eventually leave.
I am Turkish and lived in Australia for almost 8 years up until November 2006, left it a few months after getting my Australian passport. As nice as Sydney was, Australia was kind of a boring country and I couldn't take it anymore after a trip to Tasmania. It was weird how empty and far away it all felt.

I had the compulsory military service problem in Turkey back then so I couldn't go back home permanently. So I moved to the UK for better career opportunities and being closer to home. And I worked there for four years during and after a 1-year masters degree. Then I sorted out the Turk army service and moved to Istanbul.

Referring to your comment about the non-first world people, I think you're quite right. Third world doctors and engineers are driving taxis and trams in Australia and they keep doing it because of not having anything good at home to go back to.

Turkey is not really a first world country, but I'm pretty certain Istanbul as a city is a lot more exciting and happening than Sydney and Melbourne combined. And I do not feel less safe here than London or Sydney. Some Turks stay in Australia long-term for a better life and more money.

I have started thinking about returning to Sydney recently though, for a change of scenery at least for a little while or to see if I can do it longer. But the move is a little frightening as I have been self-employed for the last 6-7 years. And it seems soo much more expensive than it used to be. And I'm not very fond of Aussies in general, when it is often perfectly fine with Brits and other Europeans.

Last edited by anatolie; Oct 23rd 2017 at 7:53 pm.
anatolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23rd 2017, 8:56 pm   #85
Lost in BE Cyberspace
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Hill overlooking the SE Melbourne suburbs
Posts: 16,374
BadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond reputeBadgeIsBack has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Yup.there are so many things going on
..its hard to explain.

However, Australia is not all sun, dolphins and movie theaters in your home and in Perth for example (Rottnest or Hillaries).. Lots of opportunities.

Word of warning: you do need to be reasonably robust and resourceful:no more than a reasonably adjusted person.. people ill equipped and feeling sorry for themselves or who tend to sweat the things that aren't important do occasionally get overwhelmed..

Just my advice..3rd world people do work professionally: how articulate you are and how you present is probably the key. There are 3rd world workers asking for high salaries who don't articulate that well and under deliver (but also have some of the market cornered) and that is why employers want to get some sort of return and demand it. I do.

Last edited by BadgeIsBack; Oct 23rd 2017 at 9:24 pm.
BadgeIsBack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23rd 2017, 11:19 pm   #86
Concierge
 
spouse of scouse's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: Wirral UK
Posts: 6,818
spouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by anatolie View Post
I am Turkish and lived in Australia for almost 8 years up until November 2006, left it a few months after getting my Australian passport. As nice as Sydney was, Australia was kind of a boring country and I couldn't take it anymore after a trip to Tasmania. It was weird how empty and far away it all felt.

I had the compulsory military service problem in Turkey back then so I couldn't go back home permanently. So I moved to the UK for better career opportunities and being closer to home. And I worked there for four years during and after a 1-year masters degree. Then I sorted out the Turk army service and moved to Istanbul.

Referring to your comment about the non-first world people, I think you're quite right. Third world doctors and engineers are driving taxis and trams in Australia and they keep doing it because of not having anything good at home to go back to.

Turkey is not really a first world country, but I'm pretty certain Istanbul as a city is a lot more exciting and happening than Sydney and Melbourne combined. And I do not feel less safe here than London or Sydney. Some Turks stay in Australia long-term for a better life and more money.

I have started thinking about returning to Sydney recently though, for a change of scenery at least for a little while or to see if I can do it longer. But the move is a little frightening as I have been self-employed for the last 6-7 years. And it seems soo much more expensive than it used to be. And I'm not very fond of Aussies in general, when it is often perfectly fine with Brits and other Europeans.
I see you're up to your old tricks again - bored, are you? This thread is 6 months old, must have taken you a long time to find it

As for coming back to Australia, probably best if you take your own advice and don't. One of your constant rants against the country and its people below, just in case you forget how much you hate the place:

Australia is the dullest place in the world and yes it is extremely overrated.. In some ways behind even countries like Turkey and Brazil.. I could come up with tens of reasons why it is so..

Who says Aussies are friendly? Yes they are on the facade, but in fact they are the most two-faced pretentious racist bunch I have ever met in my life. I left London 2 years ago and avoided moving back to booring Osstraria even though not doing well financially where I am. I could get a good job if I returned to Shitney or Melbouring and not doing it no matter what!

Not everyone has to like Australia, I have a friend that was telling me the other day that he'd rather kill himself than living in Australia. Well..


But seriously.....your troll posts are way too blatant and lacking in nuance to have the effect you crave, the vast majority of people are either just going to laugh, or fall asleep. Hop off and find something else to occupy yourself, there's a good troll, and we'll see you in another 5 years
__________________
An Aussie wool
spouse of scouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24th 2017, 7:21 am   #87
BE Enthusiast
 
Still Game's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: In a big country, dreams stay with you ...
Posts: 717
Still Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond reputeStill Game has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Was it worth is, yes, it still is. There were no sweat nor tears.

My OH received his visa, applied online for four roles, received one interview by skype three weeks later and was offered the role four days later. Then they offered him a double promotion before he started working (he did have to answer more criteria). He's now two levels above his role in the UK and on 3 times his UK salary. Even though some costs are higher out here, we have a lot more money left after bills etc. are paid and we're saving well.

Money is not everything. Aside from money he, and we as a family are so happy with the move. The friendliness is off the scale and the lovely warm days are delightful.

No-ones story is the same. There are people still on this forum who haven't had a great time in Australia and went back to the UK. If you read all their stories I can understand why you would be hugely worried. However, many other happy other people who are doing well out in Australia don't write their stories on here. Some do - read the 'update' section. You need to read all stories to get a balanced view, but, even if you do, you story most likely will be different to everyone's anyway.

Do you research as much as you can. Yes it doesn't mean a guaranteed role but you will have an idea as to what is out there. From thereon... well that's your story to write.
__________________
Oh dear. That's it done now.
Still Game is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24th 2017, 8:07 am   #88
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 29
anatolie is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
I see you're up to your old tricks again - bored, are you? This thread is 6 months old, must have taken you a long time to find it
You know, people can go through phases. And I am not sure why they get offended so easily by what some people may like or dislike or when they hear what they don't want to hear. You may hate something a few years ago, and like it now. This is an open forum for people to voice their opinions. I stand behind what I said five years ago and that very old message must have had some impact on you for you to go back and search and attack me. Please don't try, I am not going to argue with you. Oh, by the way, it is nice to see you too!

Last edited by anatolie; Oct 24th 2017 at 8:10 am.
anatolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24th 2017, 9:50 am   #89
Concierge
 
spouse of scouse's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: Wirral UK
Posts: 6,818
spouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond reputespouse of scouse has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by anatolie View Post
You know, people can go through phases. And I am not sure why they get offended so easily by what some people may like or dislike or when they hear what they don't want to hear. You may hate something a few years ago, and like it now. This is an open forum for people to voice their opinions. I stand behind what I said five years ago and that very old message must have had some impact on you for you to go back and search and attack me. Please don't try, I am not going to argue with you. Oh, by the way, it is nice to see you too!
...and this reply was so predicable too zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
__________________
An Aussie wool
spouse of scouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24th 2017, 10:05 am   #90
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 29
anatolie is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: So was it worth it after all the sweat/tears?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
...and this reply was so predicable too zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
anatolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   British Expats / Living & Moving Abroad / Australia


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 9:15 pm.


Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1999-2010 BritishExpats.com