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Old Mar 13th 2005, 11:44 am   #46
 
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiddenPaw
I agree totally....a new envrionment can give you such incentive to lead a different life...maybe it's because the lack of familiarity of EVERYTHING forces you to see things in a different perspective. - a blank canvas perhaps?
This is true to an extent, but I think it runs deeper. Different perspectives on life can be driven by life changing moments, of which emigrating is surely one. The 2 people most dear to me in life have both come close to death prematurely and this has changed their perspectives on life generally. I don't intend to bring this thread down as it is great to feel so much positive vibes. Both the people I'm talking about changed to very much appreciating life and not the frills that go with it. Money and material goods are not as important as friendship, having good times and experiencing new things and places to them.

Perhaps everyone has it in them to break the mould, but for most of us it takes something to kick start that. Emigrating is a perfect catalyst for someone to break the mould if it's what they want to do.

Carl
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 11:55 am   #47
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fireeater
This is true to an extent, but I think it runs deeper. Different perspectives on life can be driven by life changing moments, of which emigrating is surely one. The 2 people most dear to me in life have both come close to death prematurely and this has changed their perspectives on life generally. I don't intend to bring this thread down as it is great to feel so much positive vibes. Both the people I'm talking about changed to very much appreciating life and not the frills that go with it. Money and material goods are not as important as friendship, having good times and experiencing new things and places to them.

Perhaps everyone has it in them to break the mould, but for most of us it takes something to kick start that. Emigrating is a perfect catalyst for someone to break the mould if it's what they want to do.

Carl
I think that was certainly one catalystic occasion for me, and has made me value my life, and the life of others more.
People can certainly get 'stuck' until something momentous happens to shake them out of the rut. One can be happy enough with their lot, until something happens to make them question how they are living their lives, and what alternatives life has to offer.

Cas
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:07 pm   #48
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Surely Migrating, is a bit of a sledge hammer approach, on the self awareness side of things ?

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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:08 pm   #49
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Default Re: Quality of life.

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Originally Posted by carolinegorka
When I was in England, I worked very hard to obtain a decent quality of life (often working 6 days a week, and long hours - so that my days off were spent recovering, and I found that I had little time to enjoy life in England.

I worked last week and this weekend I have been able to enjoy a glorious, sunny lifestyle here in Victoria.
It started with a drive down the Great Ocean Road from my home in Williamstown to Lorne. During the drive, we stopped several times to look and walk on the amazing coastline of the area - beaches that were full of variation - from the renowned Bells Beach, where the world Surf Championships are due to be held Easter weekend; coves almost hidden by towering cliffs and a lovely stretch of rockpools where starfish, anenomes, sponges and weird and wonderful seaweeds could be seen.
The trip terminated in Lorne, a very pleasant small town which had many parrots of various kinds that I have seen during my whole time in Australia so far (King parrots; Eastern rosellas and Crimson rosellas, and a mob of Sulphur Crested Cockatoos - which seemed to take great delight in dive-bombing us as we sat having a drink in a park.

The next day was spent in Melbourne CBD at the Moomba Waterfest - watching the International Waterski Championships - as well as some time wandering the Royal Botanical gardens - all free entertainment and relaxation.

Today (had a 3 day weekend ) we spent in the vicinity of our home - having a stroll down to the Marina at Nelson Place (in Williamstown, home town)

Next week I have 4 days off together (Sat to Tues inclusive) and plan to explore further down the GOR to Port Fairy and drive back taking in the shipwreck coast and the Twelve Apostles - staying anywhere that can put us up.

I have found that my life has become less materialistic since being here, and that enjoyment comes not from ownership, but from the ability to get 'out and about', and enjoy life and the beauties of this amazing land (and I've only just tasted a little !! to be able to work my week without having to do hours of overtime (either to pay for things or else due to chronic staff shortages)
Maybe this life is not for everyone - some people feel that they need the most uptodate gadgets, flashly cars and expensive homeware etc - and fair enough to those people - but Australia does seem to offer an alternative to those that want it.

Cas
What a fantastic post Caroline. It's lovely to hear how the natural beauty of Aus can be enjoyed without trying too hard.

We had a similar experience today. Our dog is due to arrive here next Saturday. After 30 days quarantine and not having seen each other for 8 months, I'm not sure if it's the dog or us that will pee with excitement .....however....in anticipation of this I decided to look up parks within the area where we live where we can let the dog off the lead. Having found somewere on the local council website...we were surprised to realise we wouldn't have too far to go.... so we set off for a quick 5 mins car ride with local map in hand. A fact finding mission to prepare us for when the dog arrives.

We drove through our village and although we've lived here 8 months we hadn't had chance to take a real look around so we weren't too familiar with where we were going. About 5 mins away, we followed a road....and as we came to the top of what we thought was a hill we had no idea what we'd see at the bottom of it. As we came to the brow of the hill we looked ahead and we couldn't believe our eyes as we hadn't realised this area exsisted.

In the distance we could see the sea, the bright blue turquoise sky and in the background was an island right back in the distance, surrounding us was beautiful unspoilt parkland which stretched for what seemed like miles. A few families were dotted here and there, dad playing ball with the kids, grandma's and grandads, aunts and uncles and friends all sitting on blankets in the shade eating food prepared on the free BBQ facilities. Further along the road was a special area contained for the dogs which was lovely and clean again surrounded by trees and a chap could be seen throwing a frisbee for two excited labs. There were trees dotted here and there and play areas for the kids and as we drove around we could see plenty of free car parking spots.

We found a car space and parked up and we momentarily sat overlooking the parkland area with the sea in the background, blue skies and families enjoying themselves. We were literally like open mouthed guppies.

Even now....eight months on...we still can't believe how lucky we are to live in this beautiful country where these facilities and beautiful surroundings are free, where people can enjoy a relaxing Sunday morning BBQ breakfast in piece and tranquility, overlooking beautiful parkland with the sea in the background and turquoise blue skies...[have I mentioned the blue skies ]

Driving home as we were going back up the hill, we just said to each other how bloody lucky to have this 5 mins from where we live....how we wish we could "bottle it up" and send some of our good fortune back to family and friends back in UK, who only that morning had rung us to tell us they were cold and fed up .......they too were going out for a pub lunch just to get out of the house but at the same time meet up somewhere warm. We wished we could share with them our feeling of being alive. We couldn't put a price on how we felt today, how easy it all was, not a penny was spent and yet how simple the pleasure.

Before anyone thinks we're dissolusioned or from the "rose tinted brigade", there is balance here. As Caroline said, some of us give up an exsistence of money and materialism in UK and the price you pay to live here is missing family and friends, family functions, familiarity of food, culture etc. And there are still bills to pay here too, there's still crime...so it's not utopia

For us,we jointly earn not even a quarter of what I alone earned in the UK. For us here in Aus there is no company car, no company mobile, no annual bonus, no expensive holidays, no designer handbags, no designer clothes, no handmade jewellery,no Marks and Sparks food, no Harvey Nics, etc, etc....in fact our life couldn't be less "designer" .....but it's certainly more fulfilling.

We appreciate the pennies more. We realise what a conceited and spoilt life we had in the UK where money was no objective. But what we also feel is that in fact it wasn't a life for us in UK.....it was exsisting. It was selling our soul to be able to have nice things. Here in Aus we are living....we do things together.....as a family. We appreciate things that don't cost a penny and the funny thing is.....in monetary terms.......... we are as poor as church mice

Aus is not everyones cup o tea. Aus can be dreary or bland for those who don't feel this passionate about the same things as we do .....and there's nothing wrong with that. We are all different. We all want something different from our lives and if the UK is preferable to Aus for some people then that's OK too. For their own personal reasons people will prefer UK but for us and many, many, many others here in Aus, we have a lifestyle that is simple, relaxed and satisfying beyond anything we could ever have imagined or comprehend....and we feel bloody priveledged and lucky to have found it.

For those of you wanting to come here .....keep going...the DIMIA rollercoaster is worth it in the end but be realistic and don't expect it to be faultless. Nothing and nowhere in life is perfect!

But most of all.....be happy.....and appreciate........ money really isn't everything
 
Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:12 pm   #50
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fireeater
This is true to an extent, but I think it runs deeper. Different perspectives on life can be driven by life changing moments, of which emigrating is surely one. The 2 people most dear to me in life have both come close to death prematurely and this has changed their perspectives on life generally. I don't intend to bring this thread down as it is great to feel so much positive vibes. Both the people I'm talking about changed to very much appreciating life and not the frills that go with it. Money and material goods are not as important as friendship, having good times and experiencing new things and places to them.

Perhaps everyone has it in them to break the mould, but for most of us it takes something to kick start that. Emigrating is a perfect catalyst for someone to break the mould if it's what they want to do.

Carl
Hubby has just turned 40 and I will be 40 this year, a time in our lives to reflect on what we have done, what we have got and what we want. Maybe it is just the old fashioned mid life crisis !!! Who knows, but we feel that at least we are doing something about it.

Also along the way of visa application we have found 2 people, friends that we know quite well both diagnosed with cancer. Upsetting as it is, I do feel it almost justifies our reasons for moving away and starting a new life. Life is so short you really have to take opportunities as they come along.
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:17 pm   #51
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiddenPaw
I agree totally....a new envrionment can give you such incentive to lead a different life...maybe it's because the lack of familiarity of EVERYTHING forces you to see things in a different perspective. - a blank canvas perhaps?
I think maybe it's because you don't have to live up to anyone's expectations. No-one knows you or think they know you in a new country. Back home you are a certain person to your mother, another person to your father and siblings, friends and acquintances. If they've known you most or all of your life it's even worse because they think their history with you makes them specialists on the subject of "you". In a new country you can just be yourself & everyone who gets to know you gets to know the real you without any biases because of that "thing" you did when you were 12, or that other time when you screwed up royally on your 16th birthday :eek It's really nice to meet people & all they see is the person you are today.
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:21 pm   #52
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozzieeagle
Surely Migrating, is a bit of a sledge hammer approach, on the self awareness side of things ?

Emigrating was something which had been seriously considered for about 5 years - my experience was just one aspect in confirming the decision for me.

Self awareness? This thread is about my own experience in comparing life lived in England to that I have had in Australia. My own thoughts and feeling - based on life-experience and what I want for the future.
Saying that, I do feel more at home here than I have in England for a long time.
I am aware of a more self-happiness
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:24 pm   #53
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenixuk2oz
What a fantastic post Caroline. It's lovely to hear how the natural beauty of Aus can be enjoyed without trying too hard.

We had a similar experience today. Our dog is due to arrive here next Saturday. After 30 days quarantine and not having seen each other for 8 months, I'm not sure if it's the dog or us that will pee with excitement .....however....in anticipation of this I decided to look up parks within the area where we live where we can let the dog off the lead. Having found somewere on the local council website...we were surprised to realise we wouldn't have too far to go.... so we set off for a quick 5 mins car ride with local map in hand. A fact finding mission to prepare us for when the dog arrives.

We drove through our village and although we've lived here 8 months we hadn't had chance to take a real look around so we weren't too familiar with where we were going. About 5 mins away, we followed a road....and as we came to the top of what we thought was a hill we had no idea what we'd see at the bottom of it. As we came to the brow of the hill we looked ahead and we couldn't believe our eyes as we hadn't realised this area exsisted.

In the distance we could see the sea, the bright blue turquoise sky and in the background was an island right back in the distance, surrounding us was beautiful unspoilt parkland which stretched for what seemed like miles. A few families were dotted here and there, dad playing ball with the kids, grandma's and grandads, aunts and uncles and friends all sitting on blankets in the shade eating food prepared on the free BBQ facilities. Further along the road was a special area contained for the dogs which was lovely and clean again surrounded by trees and a chap could be seen throwing a frisbee for two excited labs. There were trees dotted here and there and play areas for the kids and as we drove around we could see plenty of free car parking spots.

We found a car space and parked up and we momentarily sat overlooking the parkland area with the sea in the background, blue skies and families enjoying themselves. We were literally like open mouthed guppies.

Even now....eight months on...we still can't believe how lucky we are to live in this beautiful country where these facilities and beautiful surroundings are free, where people can enjoy a relaxing Sunday morning BBQ breakfast in piece and tranquility, overlooking beautiful parkland with the sea in the background and turquoise blue skies...[have I mentioned the blue skies ]

Driving home as we were going back up the hill, we just said to each other how bloody lucky to have this 5 mins from where we live....how we wish we could "bottle it up" and send some of our good fortune back to family and friends back in UK, who only that morning had rung us to tell us they were cold and fed up .......they too were going out for a pub lunch just to get out of the house but at the same time meet up somewhere warm. We wished we could share with them our feeling of being alive. We couldn't put a price on how we felt today, how easy it all was, not a penny was spent and yet how simple the pleasure.

Before anyone thinks we're dissolusioned or from the "rose tinted brigade", there is balance here. As Caroline said, some of us give up an exsistence of money and materialism in UK and the price you pay to live here is missing family and friends, family functions, familiarity of food, culture etc. And there are still bills to pay here too, there's still crime...so it's not utopia

For us,we jointly earn not even a quarter of what I alone earned in the UK. For us here in Aus there is no company car, no company mobile, no annual bonus, no expensive holidays, no designer handbags, no designer clothes, no handmade jewellery,no Marks and Sparks food, no Harvey Nics, etc, etc....in fact our life couldn't be less "designer" .....but it's certainly more fulfilling.

We appreciate the pennies more. We realise what a conceited and spoilt life we had in the UK where money was no objective. But what we also feel is that in fact it wasn't a life for us in UK.....it was exsisting. It was selling our soul to be able to have nice things. Here in Aus we are living....we do things together.....as a family. We appreciate things that don't cost a penny and the funny thing is.....in monetary terms.......... we are as poor as church mice

Aus is not everyones cup o tea. Aus can be dreary or bland for those who don't feel this passionate about the same things as we do .....and there's nothing wrong with that. We are all different. We all want something different from our lives and if the UK is preferable to Aus for some people then that's OK too. For their own personal reasons people will prefer UK but for us and many, many, many others here in Aus, we have a lifestyle that is simple, relaxed and satisfying beyond anything we could ever have imagined or comprehend....and we feel bloody priveledged and lucky to have found it.

For those of you wanting to come here .....keep going...the DIMIA rollercoaster is worth it in the end but be realistic and don't expect it to be faultless. Nothing and nowhere in life is perfect!

But most of all.....be happy.....and appreciate........ money really isn't everything
What a lovely, lovely post - thanks to you too.

I agree, nowhere is perfect, but it is what you make of your chances that is important.

Cas
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:27 pm   #54
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G'Day
I think maybe it's because you don't have to live up to anyone's expectations. No-one knows you or think they know you in a new country. Back home you are a certain person to your mother, another person to your father and siblings, friends and acquintances. If they've known you most or all of your life it's even worse because they think their history with you makes them specialists on the subject of "you". In a new country you can just be yourself & everyone who gets to know you gets to know the real you without any biases because of that "thing" you did when you were 12, or that other time when you screwed up royally on your 16th birthday :eek It's really nice to meet people & all they see is the person you are today.
So true...........

Cas
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:28 pm   #55
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenixuk2oz
As we came to the brow of the hill we looked ahead and we couldn't believe our eyes as we hadn't realised this area exsisted.
One of the things we are really looking forward to is exploring and discovering new places. I love just getting on my bike (pedally bike that is ) and heading off somewhere. Ususally with a picnic in my backpack and Mrs M lagging behind somewhere.

Sounds like you've found the perfect spot for you pooch anyway.
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:30 pm   #56
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G'Day
I think maybe it's because you don't have to live up to anyone's expectations.
I've thought about this a lot and what you've written here is bang on. I've never lived that far from family and long-time friends so I guess the way I am is partly because of how I'm expected to be. I look forward to being free of that in a new country sometime soon
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:32 pm   #57
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wmoore
One of the things we are really looking forward to is exploring and discovering new places. I love just getting on my bike (pedally bike that is ) and heading off somewhere. Ususally with a picnic in my backpack and Mrs M lagging behind somewhere.

Sounds like you've found the perfect spot for you pooch anyway.
Can you pedal that quickly Wayne?

Discovering new places is fantastic - somehow I didn't have the time or inspiration often in UK.
Dr Livingstone I presume?

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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:39 pm   #58
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinegorka
Can you pedal that quickly Wayne?

Discovering new places is fantastic - somehow I didn't have the time or inspiration often in UK.
Dr Livingstone I presume?

Cas
When I was made redundant in '92, I spent about a month going out every day riding all over the area. On-road, off-road. I loved going up into the hills and woods near where I lived and getting absolutely filthy

I could get some speed up coming back down this hills but going up them?
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:42 pm   #59
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Default Re: Quality of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wmoore
When I was made redundant in '92, I spent about a month going out every day riding all over the area. On-road, off-road. I loved going up into the hills and woods near where I lived and getting absolutely filthy

I could get some speed up coming back down this hills but going up them?
I did that on horses
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Old Mar 13th 2005, 12:42 pm   #60
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Default Re: Quality of life.

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Originally Posted by carolinegorka
What a lovely, lovely post - thanks to you too.

I agree, nowhere is perfect, but it is what you make of your chances that is important.

Cas
Thank you Caroline. Much appreciated
 
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